WorldCat Identities

McDonagh, Don

Overview
Works: 348 works in 440 publications in 2 languages and 6,052 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Biographies  Dictionaries  Reference works  Catalogs  Exhibition catalogs  Stories, plots, etc  Interviews  Television interviews 
Roles: Author, Interviewer, Other, Author of introduction, Contributor, Dancer
Classifications: GV1783, 793.32
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about Don McDonagh
 
Most widely held works by Don McDonagh
The complete guide to modern dance by Don McDonagh( Book )

11 editions published between 1976 and 1977 in English and held by 1,244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The rise and fall and rise of modern dance by Don McDonagh( Book )

34 editions published between 1970 and 1990 in English and held by 1,070 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Martha Graham: a biography by Don McDonagh( Book )

18 editions published between 1973 and 1975 in 3 languages and held by 956 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

George Balanchine by Don McDonagh( Book )

6 editions published in 1983 in English and Undetermined and held by 805 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How to enjoy ballet by Don McDonagh( Book )

3 editions published between 1978 and 1980 in English and held by 649 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A prominent dance critic briefly recounts the history of ballet, provides a behind-the-scenes look into the ballet world, surveys the repertoires of leading companies, and instructs readers in the styles, forms, and performance standards of ballet
Learning disabilities explained : the Lamm Institute's guide to diagnosis, remediation and help for your learning-disabled child by Stanley S Lamm( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 546 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dance fever by Don McDonagh( Book )

3 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dance crazes always make the wheels of social activity spin. From generation to generation, popular culture has been expressed most vividly by social dancing: The waltz and two step; Ragtime: The turkey trot and Grizzly bear; The tango, castle walk and fox trot; The charleston, black bottom and shimmy; Marathon dancing and the big bands; The lindy, samba and mambo; The cha cha and rock 'n' roll; America bandstand, the twist and the frug; Disco: the hustle. So, whether you hustle with the best of them, fox-trot no matter what the band plays, or remain on the sidelines with your two left feet, Dance Fever will delight you with its engaging blend of wit and nostalgia. -- from back cover
Don McDonagh's complete guide to modern dance by Don McDonagh( Book )

5 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International dictionary of modern dance( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dance : a very social history( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Twirling figures, gloved hands clasped, the strains of the violin..." These words from the first essay in this delightful book could be describing an eighteenth-century minuet performed by aristocratic guests at a Versailles ball, a nineteenth-century cotillion of white-gowned debutantes in new York, or a stylish moment created on the silver screen by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. The steps and the music and the dresses may vary, but the exciting and elegant sight of society enjoying itself on the dance floor has persisted through the ages. In this book, published to coincide with an exhibition held at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art under the direction of Diana Vreeland, four authors look at the subject of social dancing from four different points of view. Carol McD. Wallace surveys the great balls and dancing parties of Europe, England, and America from the eighteenth century to the present, while Don McDonagh describes the dance steps themselves, from the early basse danze of Italy to the twist of modern-day America. Jean Druesedow, associate curator in charge of the Costume Institute, discusses the evolution of the ball gown and other costumes designed for dancing, and Laurence Libin, curator of musical instruments, assisted by Constance Old, analyzes the way in which dance has been depicted in works of art through the centuries. Illustrated with paintings, works of decorative art, contemporary prints and photographs, these lively essays re-create the rhythmic energy, the social proprieties, the colorful costumes and anecdotes of dances and dancers past and present. -- from dust jacket
To fight and do our best : the 1st Australian Armoured Division in Gunnedah 1942-1943 by Cate Clark( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interview with Twyla Tharp by Twyla Tharp( Recording )

6 editions published between 1970 and 1976 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disc 1 (ca. 65 min.). [Begins abruptly.] Twyla Tharp speaks with Don McDonagh about the recent London tour of her company [Twyla Tharp and Dancers] to film certain works for ITV, including Eight jelly rolls, and to perform live; the company's rehearsals in London; the publicity for the tour; Frederick Ashton's favorable opinion of the performance; the films made for ITV; the company's live performances, including the critical reception; the strain on the company of performing for nine consecutive nights; financial aspects of the tour; her plans regarding teaching, in particular the classes she plans to offer; her reasons for not maintaining a repertory; reasons she does not wish at this time to accept commissions for other companies; reasons for and conditions under which she would choreograph for New York City Ballet [short gap]; her current interest in using a Bach composition as a dance score; her feelings about her son, in particular regarding the effect on her work of having a child; her tendency to reject instruction in favor of self-help; her parents' self-reliance; her feelings about how her personality came across in a filmed interview; the relationship of personality and professional success, for example in the cases of George Balanchine and Frederick Ashton; discussion in general terms of Ashton's choreography and Balanchine's choreography; her difficulty in finding compatible musicians; the composers Steve Reich and Terry Reilly. [Ends abruptly.]
Ballet for all by Peter Brinson( Book )

3 editions published between 1971 and 1973 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ballet for all: a guide to one hundred ballets by Peter Brinson( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dance audiences' expectations( Visual )

3 editions published between 1989 and 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guests discuss American audiences. How far have we come in producing a nation of people supportive of dance?
'Seamless' danced by Elizabeth Keen ; Judson Memorial Church, January 15, 1968 by Don McDonagh( )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Don McDonagh, Patsy Tarr, David Vaughan( Visual )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guests discuss American audiences. How far have we come in producing a nation of people supportive of dance?
Interview with Erick Hawkins by Erick Hawkins( Recording )

2 editions published between 1971 and 1972 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Part 1, disc 2 (ca. 31 min.). Erick Hawkins speaks with Don McDonagh about first seeing Martha Graham dance in 1930-1931; seeing Charles Weidman and Doris Humphrey dance in N.Y.; the first work he saw of Graham's, Primitive mysteries; the Guild Theatre in N.Y., and attending dance performances there; seeing Chronicle and Frontiers in 1935-1936; students' lack of passion for dance and dancing; Ethel Winter and dancing at Bennington; Graham's sense of competition; his inability to teach after leaving Graham's company due to politics in the dance world; the relationship between Graham and Louis Horst, and the ways they would work together; growing up in Trinidad, Colo., and the landscape there, and how it has effected his artistic sensibility; the dance El penitente, and his personal reaction to it; the fact that critics appreciated Graham's emotions more than her aesthetics; studying ballet with George Balanchine; not liking to read criticism of his dances until after the season is finished; the effect critics had on Graham
Interview with Ted Shawn by Ted Shawn( Recording )

2 editions published between 1967 and 1971 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disc 1 (ca. 30 min.). Ted Shawn speaks into recorder [no interviewer present] answering specific questions provided by Don McDonagh, about working with Martha Graham; touring in London and Paris in 1922 with the Denishawn company, and anecdotes associated with the company and the tour; Betty Horst's [Louis Horst's wife] accompaniment on the tour, and Louis Horst's role in that arrangement; Graham's emotional state during the tour due to Betty's presence; Graham's early solos outside of the Denishawn company; Shawn's inability to attend Graham's performances due to his own rigorous touring and teaching schedule; Graham's mid-career dances, such as El penitente, Punch and the Judy, Letter to the world, and Shawn's opinion of those dances; his work in creating Jacob's Pillow; his opinion of Graham's dancers; Graham dancing and lecturing at Jacob's Pillow on the subject of image; Graham's role in Denishawn when Shawn was serving in the military; anecdotes about the Denishawn company and the buildings they occupied in L.A., Calif.; difficulty in describing his relationship with Graham, one that spanned over 55 years
Interview with Charles Weidman by Charles Weidman( Recording )

2 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Charles Weidman speaks with Don McDonagh about working with Ted Shawn; Martha Graham and reviews of her dances; anecdotes about Grahams' tantrums; Graham's mother and her maid, Lizzie; Graham's role in supporting her mother and her sisters after the death of her father; his father's support of his dancing; dancing at Radio City Music Hall with Graham; dances in the form of vaudeville acts; the evolution of Graham's style; the difference between Graham and Doris Humphrey; Graham's emhasis on breath work and release techniques; Graham's attitude toward ballet; Graham favoring heavy, earthy movements; the change in Graham's work after the arrival of Erick Hawkins, and Graham's attitude toward ballet after meeting Hawkins; Graham and Hawkins' relationship; the use of musical accompaniment with the dances; the change in state legislature in N.Y. allowing dance and theater on Sundays; difficulties in preparing dances and choreography; issues surrounding staging dances and the associated costs; modern dancers resistance to working together, unlike balletic companies; Louis Horst's influence on Graham; Ruth St. Denis' interest in Christian Science, and Graham's interest by association; Ted Shawn and the revival of Denishawn dances at Jacob's Pillow; his belief that dance institutions have improved since Graham's time; teaching in universities across the U.S., and the presence of dance majors at universities; attitude toward Ted Shawn [abrupt end]
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.29 (from 0.22 for How to enj ... to 0.83 for Interview ...)

International dictionary of modern dance
Alternative Names
Mac Donagh Don

MacDonagh Don

Mc Donagh Don

Languages
English (108)

German (1)

Covers
To fight and do our best : the 1st Australian Armoured Division in Gunnedah 1942-1943