WorldCat Identities

Coursen, Herbert R.

Overview
Works: 101 works in 227 publications in 1 language and 9,431 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Film adaptations  Television adaptations  History  Catalogs  Biography  Fiction 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: PR3093, 822.33
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Herbert R Coursen
Macbeth : a guide to the play by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

6 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 866 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Christian ritual and the world of Shakespeare's tragedies by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

13 editions published between 1975 and 1978 in English and held by 748 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shakespeare on television : an anthology of essays and reviews( Book )

8 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 657 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shakespearean performance as interpretation by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

8 editions published in 1992 in English and Undetermined and held by 631 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teaching Shakespeare with film and television : a guide by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

7 editions published in 1997 in English and Undetermined and held by 586 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Watching Shakespeare on television by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

6 editions published in 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 439 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Watching Shakespeare on Television looks at Shakespeare as a cultural phenomenon and at the videocassette as "text"--That is, as an object fixed in time as well as in its assumptions about its medium. Even films made to be shown at a cinema are also designed to become cassettes for the vast "secondary" market. H.R. Coursen's study of Shakespearean films and television productions includes such classics as Olivier's Hamlet and Brook's and Welles's King Lear, as well as more recent productions such as Kevin Kline's and Mel Gibson's Hamlets, Kenneth Branagh's Henvy V, and Peter Greenaway's version of The Tempest, Prospero's Books. Shakespeare's scripts are designed to be "open to interpretation." That openness is not the invention of disciples of Foucault or Derrida. The "meaning" of a Shakespeare script can never be fixed; rather, it is a temporal quality that shows how a script reflects, reinterprets, or reemphasizes the cultural and ideological assumptions of a particular moment in history. Shakespeare remains popular, as Branagh's Henry V, Zeffirelli's Hamlet, and a proliferation of Shakespeare's festivals prove. The energy known as Shakespeare cannot be isolated from the culture that constantly reappropriates the scripts and creates new audiences for them. Shakespeare "works" on television because television is a linguistic medium, and because we are becoming accustomed to the diminished scale of the television (and the videocassette), as opposed to the grander dimensions of cinema. Shakespeare survives domestication, but in ways that demand investigation about why and how the scripts can work on television, and about the nature of this medium when it is charged with Shakespearean energy. Watching Shakespeare on Television looks at Gertrude, a character often clear in performance even if "unwritten" in the script, and at Hamlet's disquisition to Yorick's skull, subject to a wide range of options and interpretations. Other subjects covered are "style" in A Midsummer Night's Dream, particularly the 1982 ART production; the advantages film has over studio productions; and editing scripts for television, with a focus on the Nunn Othello and the Kline Hamlet. In the latter production, long takes contrast with the quicksilver montage technique of Zeffirelli's film version. Another chapter examines Othello as a script demanding a black actor in the lead, and it looks at the Nunn and Suzman versions as cases in point. Closure in Hamlet is analyzed as well: television, the modern medium of political closure, tends to include Fortinbras, as opposed to film which usually excludes him. Another chapter evaluates Prospero's Books, where the importation of television to film tends to erase film's field of depth and results in no improvement, regardless of the trumpeted "technological breakthrough" of high-definition television. Finally, the book peers into the future of Shakespeare's moving image, with attention paid to Peter Donaldson's Interactive Archive at M.I.T
The leasing out of England : Shakespeare's second Henriad by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

6 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 426 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The tempest : a guide to the play by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 398 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Tempest was first published in 1623 and is probably the last play Shakespeare wrote by himself. The product of his artistic maturity, it has inspired a variety of modern adaptations and remains one of his most popular plays. While its plot is fairly straightforward, The Tempest addresses numerous issues and topics current in the 17th century, such as magic and colonialism. Scholars, in turn, have responded by generating a vast body of criticism. This reference is a comprehensive guide to the play." "The volume begins with a brief consideration of the play's textual history, followed by an evaluation of the merits of various modern editions. It then looks at some of Shakespeare's likely sources and influences, from classical literature to accounts of a 17th-century shipwreck. A chapter on the play's dramatic structure moves through the text and touches on issues raised in greater detail later in the book. The volume then studies some of the play's themes and summarizes how critics have responded to them. Finally, the book comments on the play's performance history and analyzes major productions."--Jacket
Shakespeare in production : whose history? by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

6 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 374 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The New Historicism "contextualizes" the literature it examines. It sees literature as one aspect of the energies and anxieties characteristic of a given culture, neither independent nor superior to it. While some may quarrel with these premises, it is not necessary to agree with them, or even to be a New Historicist, in order to put their techniques to use. Shakespeare in Production examines a number of plays in context. Included are the 1936 Romeo and Juliet, unpopular with critics of filmed Shakespeare, but very much a "photoplay" of its time; the opening sequences of filmed Hamlets which span more than seventy years; The Comedy of Errors on television, where production of this script is almost impossible; and the Branagh Much Ado About Nothing, a "popular" film discussed in the context of comedy as genre. "Whose history?" inevitably turns out to be that of the individual observer, for regardless of the criteria deployed, criticism is an intensely subjective activity, and is meant to be when it deals with drama. In this discussion of Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing, for example, the contemporary response to the film becomes the subject of the chapter. For, although the film is much more than what is said about it, it is also less, in that the critical response is part of the overall creative activity involved in a Shakespeare production
Shakespeare : the two traditions by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 348 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The purpose of this book is to examine recent productions of Shakespeare on stage and film and to lay out some interpretive guidelines for responding to the scripts as recreated in these two very different formats and within the conflicted environment of shifting critical paradigms. The two traditions - Shakespeare on stage and Shakespeare on film - have experienced a midair collision with postmodernism. The results are beginning to be chronicled."--Jacket
Reading Shakespeare on stage by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

5 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 311 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The compensatory psyche : a Jungian approach to Shakespeare by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

7 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shakespeare in space : recent Shakespeare productions on screen by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

7 editions published in 2002 in English and Undetermined and held by 245 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The space of performance dictates what can occur within it. A proscenium stage as opposed to a thrust stage or black-and-white film as opposed to color film conditions what a Shakespeare script can communicate to an audience. The productions and their accomodation to their medium that this book treats in detail include television productions such as the Shaw-Warner Richard II, the Caird Henry IV, the Hytner Twelfth Night, the Eyre King Lear, and the second season the the Animated Shakespeare Series, as well as films such as the British Film Institute's silent film production, the Hoffman A Midsummer-Night's Dream, the Almereyda Hamlet, the Branagh Hamlet, the Taymor Titus, and the Branagh Love's Labour's Lost."--Jacket
Shakespeare translated : derivatives on film and TV by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

10 editions published between 2005 and 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Shakespeare's works are constantly being translated into new contexts, a fact which demonstrates the vitality of his plots in contemporary settings. Shakespeare Translated looks at the way certain plays - particularly Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear - have been recontextualized into films like O and King of Texas, or television shows such as "The Gilmore Girls," "Cheers," and "Clueless." This book illustrates how Romeo and Juliet is the most shamelessly appropriated of Shakespeare's scripts for contemporary use because its plot fits so neatly into the teenage culture that has burgeoned since the late 1950s. Shakespeare Translated looks at what has happened to Shakespeare, for better or - more often - for worse, as the new millennium begins."--Jacket
Contemporary Shakespeare production by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

8 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Contemporary Shakespeare Production suggests that analysis and description of selected productions is the only valid approach to understanding Shakespeare's art. It looks specifically at Richard II, Henry V, Ophelia, The Tempest, allusions to Shakespeare in film, and recent film and television productions of As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, and King Lear."--Jacket
As up they grew; autobiographical essays by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

5 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shaping the self : style and technique in the narrative by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After the war by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The search for Archerland by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

2 editions published between 1993 and 2008 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fourteen-year-old Paul meets monsters and magicians in his quest to free Archerland from the evil tyrants enslaving its people
Winter dreams : poems by Herbert R Coursen( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Macbeth : a guide to the play
Alternative Names
Coursen, H.R.

Coursen, H. R. (Herbert R.)

Coursen, Herbert R.

Languages
English (112)

Covers
Teaching Shakespeare with film and television : a guideThe tempest : a guide to the playShakespeare : the two traditionsShakespeare in space : recent Shakespeare productions on screenShakespeare translated : derivatives on film and TVContemporary Shakespeare productionAfter the warThe search for Archerland