WorldCat Identities

Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 11,917 works in 16,993 publications in 1 language and 208,587 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Periodicals  Bibliography  Bibliographies  Field guides  Reference works  Dictionaries 
Roles: Other, Editor, Publisher, isb, Organizer of meeting
Classifications: TA419, 620.12
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
Wood handbook : basic information on wood as a material of construction with data for its use in design and specification( Book )

2 editions published in 1955 in English and held by 709 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

4 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 603 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)( )

36 editions published between 1974 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 527 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses
Wood : colors and kinds by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

5 editions published between 1955 and 1956 in English and held by 524 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wood engineering handbook by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

12 editions published between 1974 and 2000 in English and held by 502 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Wood-frame house construction by L. O Anderson( )

2 editions published in 1955 in English and held by 499 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dividends from wood research( )

in English and held by 499 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dry kiln : operator's manual by Edmund Frederick Rasmussen( )

2 editions published in 1961 in English and held by 480 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material( Book )

6 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 463 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wood floors for dwellings by United States( )

3 editions published in 1961 in English and held by 440 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Air drying of lumber( )

4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 361 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes how lumber can be air-dried most effectively under outdoor conditions and illustrates the principles and procedures of air-drying lumber that were developed through field investigations and observations of industrial practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the yarding of lumber in unit packages. Included are topics such as why lumber is dried, advantages and limitations of the drying process, properties of wood in relation to drying, layout of the drying yard, piling methods, causes and remedies of air-drying defects, and protection of air-dried lumber
Timber rivets in structural composite lumber by Ronald W Wolfe( )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 348 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Timber bridge economics( )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interest in timber bridges has grown rapidly in recent years as a result of new technologies in design and construction as well as advances in material manufacturing and preservative treatments. Despite these advances, little is known about the initial and life-cycle costs of timber bridges relative to those of other construction materials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the cost characteristics of timber bridges and to compare the initial cost of timber bridge superstructures with that of bridges constructed of steel, concrete, and prestressed concrete. For timber bridges, results show a relationship between cost per square foot and bridge length, load rating, and geographic location. In general, timber bridge superstructures tended to compete with steel and concrete bridge superstructures on an initial cost basis. However, the range in cost per square foot values for all bridges varied widely. This outcome was probably due to both the high variability in these data and the relatively small sample size of the data sets for steel and concrete
The encyclopedia of wood : wood as an engineering material by Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

8 editions published between 1977 and 1980 in English and held by 334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Encyclopedia of wood( Book )

10 editions published between 1980 and 2007 in English and held by 327 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A complete reference work and how to build with it
Assessment of the environmental effects associated with wooden bridges preserved with creosote, pentachlorophenol, or chromated copper arsenate by Kenneth M Brooks( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 325 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Timber bridges provide an economical alternative to concrete and steel structures, particularly in rural areas with light to moderate vehicle traffic. Wooden components of these bridges are treated with chromated copper arsenate type C (CCA), pentachlorophenol, or creosote to prolong the life of the structure from a few years to many decades. This results in reduced transportation infrastructure costs and increased public safety. However, the preservative used to treat the wooden components in timber bridges is lost to the environment in small amounts over time. This report describes the concentration of wood preservatives lost to adjacent environments and the biological response to these preservatives as environmental contaminants. Six bridges from various states were examined for risk assessment: two creosote treated bridges, two pentachlorophenol-treated bridges, and two CCA-treated bridges. In all cases, the largest bridges located in biologically active environments associated with slow-flowing water were selected to represent worst-case analyses. Sediment and water column concentrations of preservative were analyzed upstream from, under, and downstream from each bridge. The observed levels of contaminant were compared with available regulatory standards or benchmarks and with the quantitative description of the aquatic invertebrate community sampled from vegetation and sediments. Pentachlorophenol- and creosote-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were not observed in the water near any of the selected bridges. However, low levels of PAHs were observed in the sediments under and immediately downstream from these bridges. Pentachlorophenol concentrations did not approach toxicological benchmarks. Sediment concentrations of naphthalene, acenaphthylene, and phenanthrene exceeded the probable effect level. Metal levels at the bridges treated with CCA were less than predicted effect levels, in spite of questionable construction practices. Adverse biological effects were not observed in the aquatic invertebrate community or laboratory bioassays conducted on water and sediments sampled at each of the bridges. Results of this study reveal the need to follow the construction information found in Best Management Practices for the Use of Treated Wood In Aquatic Environments published by Western Wood Preservers Institute. Regulatory benchmarks used in risk assessments of this type need to be indexed to local environmental conditions. The robust invertebrate communities associated with slow-moving streams over soft bottoms were not susceptible to the concentrations of PAHs that would be expected to affect more sensitive taxa, which typically are located in faster moving water over hard bottoms. Contaminants released from timber bridges into these faster systems (where more sensitive taxa are located) are significantly diluted and not found at biologically significant levels
Field performance of timber bridges by Paula D Hilbrich Lee( )

5 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 324 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Mohawk Canal bridge was constructed in August 1994, just outside Roll, Arizona. It is a simple span, double lane, stress laminated deck superstructure, approximately 6.4 m (21 ft) long and 10.4 m (34 ft) wide and constructed with combination 16F-V3 Douglas fir glued-laminated timber beam laminations. The performance of the bridge was monitored continuously for 2 years, beginning shortly after installation. Performance monitoring involved gathering and evaluating data relative to the moisture content of the wood deck, the force level of the steel stressing bars, the vertical creep of the deck, and the behavior of the bridge under static load conditions. Comprehensive visual inspections were also conducted to assess the overall condition of the structure. Based on field evaluations, the bridge is performing properly with no structural deficiencies
Roof temperature histories in matched attics in Mississippi and Wisconsin by Jerrold E Winandy( )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To address the problem of defining actual field temperatures of various wood components in wood-framed roof systems, roof temperatures were monitored in test structures situated in the northern and southern United States (Madison, Wisconsin, and Starkville, Mississippi, respectively). The field exposure structures were intended to simulate the attics of multifamily wood-framed structures for which Model Building Codes sometimes allow the use of fire-retardant-treated roof sheathing. The structures were instrumented to monitor interior attic air, exterior air, inner and outer plywood roof sheathing, and internal rafter temperatures in dry whiteshingled structures and both dry and heavily humidified black-shingled structures. Temperatures were recorded from January 1992 through December 1999 in Wisconsin and from January 1996 through December 1999 in Mississippi. The Mississippi exposure generally induced 5ÃC to 10ÃC higher temperatures than did the Madison exposure, though the difference in annual maximum gbs1-h averagegcs temperature of both exposures was usually no more than 3ÃC to 4ÃC. Overall, black-shingled roof systems tended to be 5ÃC to 10ÃC warmer during the midafternoon of a sunny day than were comparable white-shingled roof systems. Few differences in plywood roof sheathing temperatures were noted between dry and heavily humidified structures. Attic airspace and rafter temperatures were generally 5ÃC to 10ÃC cooler in humidified attics than in dry attics. The major difference in the temperature of wood components in the Wisconsin and Mississippi structures occurred during the winter, when temperatures were as much as 20ÃC lower in Wisconsin
Field performance of timber bridges by Paula D Hilbrich Lee( )

9 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 315 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Sanborn Brook bridge was constructed in August 1991, 10 miles northeast of Concord, New Hampshire, as part of the demonstration timber bridge program of the USDA Forest Service. The bridge is a simple-span, double-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure constructed from Southern Pine lumber and is approximately 25 ft long and 28 ft wide with a skew of 14 degrees. The performance of the bridge was monitored continuously for approximately 2 years, beginning shortly after installation. Performance monitoring involved collecting and evaluating data pertaining to the moisture content of the wood deck, the force level of the stressing bars, the deck vertical creep, and the behavior of the bridge under static-load conditions. In addition, comprehensive visual inspections were conducted to assess the overall condition of the structure. Based on field evaluations, the bridge is performing well, with no structural or serviceability deficiencies
Several nondestructive evaluation techniques for assessing stiffness and MOE of small-diameter logs by Xiping Wang( )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many forests of the United States have large areas that contain trees of small diameter, mixed species, and undefined quality. Because these areas are at risk from attack by insects, disease, and uncontrollable wild fires, it is essential to find ways to increase the incentive to harvest this small-diameter material. One way to do this is to develop cost-effective products for the fiber from these trees. Nondestructive technology needs to be developed to evaluate the potential quality of stems and logs obtained from trees in such ecosystems. Static bending, transverse vibration, and longitudinal stress wave techniques are frequently used to assess the modulus of elasticity (MOE) of lumber. Excellent correlations between MOE values obtained from these techniques have been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of these techniques to evaluate the flexural stiffness and MOE of small-diameter logs. A total of 159 red pine and jack pine logs were obtained from northern Michigan and were assessed nondestructively using these techniques. Statistical comparisons between stiffness and MOE values obtained from each technique were then examined. Results of this study demonstrated that strong relationships exist between the log properties determined by the three techniques, longitudinal stress wave, transverse vibration, and static bending. Developed models allow for the prediction of static bending properties of logs at levels of accuracy previously considered unattainable. This indicates that any of these techniques can be used to sort small diameter logs with reasonable accuracy
 
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Audience level: 0.48 (from 0.30 for The Encycl ... to 0.73 for The Forest ...)

The Encyclopedia of wood
Covers
Wood engineering handbookWood handbook : wood as an engineering materialThe Encyclopedia of wood
Alternative Names
Etats-Unis Forest products laboratory

Etats-Unis Forest Products Laboratory (Madison, Wis.)

Etats-Unis Forest service Forest products laboratory

Etats-Unis. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory (Madison, Wis.)

Forente stater Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory

Forest Products Laboratory.

Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis

Forest Service US. Forest Products Laboratory.

FPL

FPL (Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.))

Madison (Wis.) Forest Product Laboratory

Madison (Wis.). Forest Products Laboratory

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Forest Service.

U.S. Department of Agriculture. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory

United States. Department of Agriculture. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory.

United States Forest Products Laboratory

United States Forest Products Laboratory (Madison, Wis.)

United States. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory.

US Department of Agriculture. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory.

USA Department of Agriculture Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory

USA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory

USDA Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wis.

Languages
English (182)