WorldCat Identities

Demos, John

Overview
Works: 46 works in 307 publications in 5 languages and 18,611 library holdings
Genres: History  Biographies  Sources  Juvenile works  Literature  Fiction  Children's audiobooks  Captivity narratives  Essays  Creative nonfiction 
Roles: Author, Editor, htt, Creator
Classifications: BF1576, 974.02
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by John Demos
Entertaining Satan : witchcraft and the culture of early New England by John Demos( Book )

38 editions published between 1982 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 3,891 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focusing on witchcraft reports and trials outside of Salem and utilizing case histories and psychological analyses, this study evaluates the incidents and trials within the context of late-seventeenth-century New England
The unredeemed captive : a family story from early America by John Demos( Book )

46 editions published between 1992 and 2005 in English and German and held by 2,534 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Early on the morning of February 29, 1704, before the settlers of Deerfield, Massachusetts, had stirred from their beds, a French and Indian war party opened fire, wielding hatchets and torches, on the lightly fortified town. What would otherwise have been a fairly commonplace episode of "Queen Anne's War" (as the War of the Spanish Succession was known in the colonies) achieved considerable notoriety in America and abroad. The reason: the Indians had managed to capture, among others, the eminent minister John Williams, his wife, Eunice Mather Williams, and their five children. This Puritan family par excellence, and more than a hundred of their good neighbors, were now at the mercy of "savages"--And the fact that these "savages" were French-speaking converts to Catholicism made the reversal of the rightful order of things no less shocking." "In The Unredeemed Captive, John Demos, Yale historian and winner of the Bancroft Prize for his book Entertaining Satan, tells the story of the minister's captured daughter Eunice, who was seven years old at the time of the Deerfield incident and was adopted by a Mohawk family living at a Jesuit mission-fort near Montreal. Two and a half years later, when Reverend Williams was released and returned to Boston amid much public rejoicing, Eunice remained behind - her Mohawk "master" unwilling to part with her. And so began a decades-long effort, alternately hopeful and demoralizing for her kin, to "redeem" her. Indeed, Eunice became a cause celebre across New England, the subject of edifying sermons, fervent prayers, and urgent envoys between the Massachusetts Bay Colony and New France. But somehow she always remained just out of reach - until eventually, her father's worst fears were confirmed: Eunice was not being held against her will. On the contrary, she had forgotten how to speak English, had married a young Mohawk man, and could not be prevailed upon to return to Deerfield."
A little commonwealth : family life in Plymouth Colony by John Demos( Book )

49 editions published between 1970 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 2,500 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An historian studies the structure and influences of family life during the first two generations of colonists in Plymouth
Circles and lines : the shape of life in early America by John Demos( )

13 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in English and held by 1,899 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Americans became new, Demos points out, before they fully understood what it meant. Their cyclical frame of reference was coming unmoored, giving way to a linear world view in early nineteenth-century America that is neatly captured by Kentucky doctor Daniel Drake's description of the chronography of his life."--Jacket
The enemy within : 2,000 years of witch-hunting in the Western world by John Demos( Book )

8 editions published in 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,327 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A cultural history of witch-hunting, from the Romans through McCarthy. The term witch-hunt is used today to describe everything from political scandals to school board shake-ups. But its origins are far from trivial. Long before the Salem witch trials, women and men were rounded up by neighbors, accused of committing horrific crimes using supernatural powers, scrutinized by priests and juries, and promptly executed. The belief in witchcraft--and the deep fear of evil it instilled in communities--led to a cycle of accusation, anger, and purging that has occurred repeatedly in the West for centuries
Past, present, and personal : the family and the life course in American history by John Demos( Book )

16 editions published between 1986 and 1989 in English and Arabic and held by 1,259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author examines the changing nature of the American family including issues of fatherhood, child abuse, adolescence, and old age
The heathen school : a story of hope and betrayal in the age of the early republic by John Demos( Book )

10 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,034 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The astonishing story of a unique missionary project-- and the America it embodied-- from historian John Demos. Near the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and "civilization." Its core element was a special school for "heathen youth" drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and, increasingly, the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years, the school prospered, indeed became quite famous. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, public resolve-- and fundamental ideals-- were put to a severe test. The Heathen School follows the progress, and the demise, of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian "removal"; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans. From its birth as a beacon of hope for universal "salvation," the heathen school descends into bitter controversy, as American racial attitudes harden and intensify. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate tragically in the Trail of Tears"-
Remarkable providences, 1600-1760 by John Demos( Book )

5 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 746 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Turning points, historical and sociological essays on the family( Book )

9 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 677 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Changes in the land : Indians, colonists, and the ecology of New England by William Cronon( Book )

4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 639 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An ecological history of colonial New England, looking at how the shift from Indian to European dominance affected the plant and animal communities of the region
Puritan girl, Mohawk girl by John Demos( )

7 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 483 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1704, Mohawk Indians attack the frontier village of Deerfield, Massachusetts, kidnapping and marching over 100 residents, including seven-year-old Eunice Williams, to Canada where she is eventually adopted into a Mohawk family and remains there willingly for the rest of her life. Based on a true story
The tried and the true : Native American women confronting colonization by John Demos( Book )

5 editions published between 1995 and 1998 in English and held by 460 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shows how interaction with white colonists changed the lives of Native American women
Remarkable providences : readings on early American history( Book )

6 editions published between 1991 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Artful history : a practical anthology by Aaron Sachs( )

4 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is there any reason that serious historical scholarship cannot receive literary expression? Isn't it possible that the most committed empiricists and postmodernists might both achieve better results by thinking of writing as a craft, rather than just a means of packaging research? This book compiles some of the most compelling efforts to make history writing eloquent, stirring, and memorable, in the realms of both practice and theory. The authors included here prove the great potential of approaching the writing of history as a literary art, even as they retain a commitment to rigorous scholarship. The collection shows how historians can aspire to find a form that matches and enhances their substance, nudging readers toward what historian John Clive called the "spell that lingers in the memory and is conducive not just to reading but to rereading." --
The enemy within : a short history of witch-hunting by John Demos( Book )

5 editions published between 2008 and 2014 in English and held by 170 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A cultural history of witch-hunting, from the Romans through McCarthy. The term witch-hunt is used today to describe everything from political scandals to school board shake-ups. But its origins are far from trivial. Long before the Salem witch trials, women and men were rounded up by neighbors, accused of committing horrific crimes using supernatural powers, scrutinized by priests and juries, and promptly executed. The belief in witchcraft--and the deep fear of evil it instilled in communities--led to a cycle of accusation, anger, and purging that has occurred repeatedly in the West for centuries
Puritan girl, mohawk girl by John Demos( Recording )

9 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this historical-fiction narrative, John Demos shares the story of Eunice Williams, a young Puritan girl who is kidnapped by Mohawks and taken to Canada. There, she is adopted into a new family, a new culture, and a different way of living. Both instructed in the Mohawk language and customs and catechized in the Roman Catholic tradition, Eunice spends her days learning to plant and harvest food and tan animal skins, among other chores. Although her father and brother try to persuade Eunice to return to Massachusetts, she ultimately chooses to remain with her Mohawk family. Grades 2-4. 2017
Here far away : photographs from the years 1964-2011 by Pentti Sammallahti( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A retrospective work that comprises nearly fifty years of photographic activity and unfolds in almost as many countries"--[Preface]
Une captive heureuse chez les Iroquois : histoire d'une famille de Nouvelle-Angleterre au début du XVIIIe siècle by John Demos( Book )

15 editions published between 1994 and 2019 in 3 languages and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Histoire de cette captive des Indiens, qui choisira de son plein gré, de demeurer chez ses ravisseurs, changera de religion et épousera un Mohawk de Kahnawake
The heathen school : a story of hope and betrayal in the age of the republic by John Demos( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The astonishing story of a unique missionary project'and the America it embodied'from award-winning historian John DemosNear the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and 'civilization.' Its core element was a special school for 'heathen youth' drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and increasingly, the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years the school prospered and became quite famous. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, public resolve'and fundamental ideals'were put to a severe test. The Heathen School follows the progress'and the demise'of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian 'removal'; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans. From its birth as a beacon of hope for universal 'salvation, ' the heathen school descends into bitter controversy as American racial attitudes harden and intensify. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate tragically in the Trail of Tears. In The Heathen School, John Demos marshals his deep empathy and feel for the textures of history to tell a moving story of families and communities'and to probe the very roots of American identity
A little commonwealth family life in Plymouth Colony by John Demos( Book )

15 editions published between 1970 and 1980 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.21 (from 0.06 for The tried ... to 0.75 for Une captiv ...)

The unredeemed captive : a family story from early America
Covers
The unredeemed captive : a family story from early AmericaA little commonwealth : family life in Plymouth ColonyCircles and lines : the shape of life in early AmericaThe enemy within : 2,000 years of witch-hunting in the Western worldPast, present, and personal : the family and the life course in American historyChanges in the land : Indians, colonists, and the ecology of New EnglandThe tried and the true : Native American women confronting colonizationRemarkable providences : readings on early American history
Alternative Names
Demos, John 1944-...

Demos John Putnam

Dī́mou, Giánnīs 1944-...

John Putnam Demos American writer and historian

John Putnam Demos Amerikaans historicus

John Putnam Demos historiador estadounidense

John Putnam Demos historiador estatunidenc

John Putnam Demos historiador estauxunidense

John Putnam Demos scríbhneoir agus staraí Meiriceánach

John Putnam Demos storico statunitense

John Putnam Demos US-amerikanischer Historiker und Schriftsteller

Δήμου, Γιάννης 1944-...

جون ديمس

Languages
English (249)

French (10)

Spanish (4)

German (1)

Arabic (1)