WorldCat Identities

Rydell, C. Peter

Overview
Works: 97 works in 295 publications in 1 language and 5,948 library holdings
Genres: Abstracts 
Roles: Author, Honoree
Classifications: AS36, 379.260973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by C. Peter Rydell
Closing the education gap : benefits and costs by Georges Vernez( )

14 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 2,522 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How much would it cost and what would the benefits be if blacks and Hispanics graduated from high school, went to college, and graduated from college at the same rate as non-Hispanic whites? The answer to this important question for the future of the nation is explored in this report. The costs of education would be high, increasing by about 20 percent in California and 10 percent in the rest of the nation. But the benefits, in the form of savings in public health and welfare expenditures and increased tax revenues from higher incomes, would be even higher. Indeed, the added costs of providing more education to minorities would be recouped well within the lifetime of taxpayers called upon to make the additional investments. The nation is experiencing a rapid immigration driven increase in the share of Hispanics in the school age population. Failure to increase the educational attainment of this group would result in growing shares of new labor-force entrants having levels of education lower than those prevailing today; in increased income disparities between blacks and Hispanics, on one hand, and Asians and non-Hispanic whites, on the other; and in increased public expenditures for social and health programs for generations to come
Controlling cocaine : supply versus demand programs by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

8 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The current cocaine epidemic in the United States started in the late 1960s, picked up momentum during the 1970s, and is still going strong in the 1990s. The number of cocaine users peaked in the early 1980s at about 9 million, and has gradually decreased to a little more than 7 million today. However, that downward trend in the total number of users is misleading, because a decline in the number of light users has masked an increase in the number of heavy users. Heavy users consume cocaine at a rate approximately eight times that of light users, so the upward trend in consumption by heavy users roughly cancels the downward trend in consumption by light users. The result is that total consumption of cocaine in the United States has remained at its mid-1980s peak for almost a decade
Modeling the demand for cocaine by Susan S Everingham( Book )

5 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report documents the development of a two-state Markovian model of the demand for cocaine and includes the estimation of incidence, prevalence, cohort retention, and consumption. The study states that the incidence of new users into light cocaine use has varied greatly over the years and is an input to the model; however, the model cannot predict future prevalence--it can only project prevalence given a hypothetical incidence scenario. The model also demonstrates that the fraction of all cocaine users who are heavy users has varied greatly over time, and that peak heavy usage followed peak incidence by about ten years. Consequently, the effect on heavy usage of government programs that reduce incidence (such as prevention programs) will only be realized many years later
Developing cost-effectiveness guidelines for managing personnel resources in a total force context : executive summary by Adele R Palmer( Book )

8 editions published in 1991 in English and Undetermined and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes recent research on modeling Department of Defense manpower decisions in a "total force" management context--i.e., in a context that simultaneously recognizes the roles of the active, reserve, and civilian work forces in achieving both peacetime and potential wartime operating goals. The research extends an earlier model in several ways--most notably by allowing for rotation, retraining, and mobilization programs--and shows how the modeling approach can support the development of general manpower management guidelines
Price increases caused by housing assistance programs : housing assistance supply experiment by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

7 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two contrasting methods of subsidizing existing housing are "housing allowances," which rely on the discipline of the market to control price increases, and "Section 8 assistance," which uses institutional regulations to control them. Contrary to preprogram predictions, evidence from actual program operations shows that the market outperforms regulation. Housing allowances cause a 2 percent increase, while Section 8 assistance causes a 26 percent increase, in the price of participants' housing. The Section 8 price increases mean that a substantial portion of the federal subsidy is diverted from participants to their landlords. To prevent that diversion, the Section 8 rules could be revised as follows: structure the subsidy so tenants pay the marginal rent dollar; pay the subsidy directly to tenants so they know they pay the marginal rent dollar; and remove the rent ceiling so it can no longer act as a rent target
Developing cost-effectiveness guidelines for managing personnel resources in a total force context by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

7 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report explores the implications of modeling Department of Defense manpower decisions in a "total force" context--i.e., in a context that simultaneously recognizes the roles of the active, reserve, and civilian work forces in achieving both peacetime and potential wartime operating goals. The authors show how the findings from applying the Total Force Management (TFM) model, developed in a previous study, can be used to develop guidelines for manning various types of defense activities. They also extend the TFM model for personnel management programs that use personnel in more than one activity. Illustrative findings indicate that mobilization and retraining programs can reduce costs even further than would be achieved by using cost-effectiveness guidelines for manning each activity separately. Finally, the authors consider whether the TFM recommendations for increased use of active personnel are sensitive to the availability of civilians for wartime work. The findings indicate that the TFM approach (1) can offer considerable insight into how different manning strategies affect the costs of meeting mission and peacetime operating objectives and (2) can be used to develop general cost-effective manning guidelines as a starting point for detailed analysis for specific personnel decisions
The Impact of rent control on the Los Angeles housing market( Book )

4 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An integrative modeling approach for managing the total defense labor force by Adele R Palmer( Book )

6 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report documents an exploratory research project that considers the salient relationships between wartime and peacetime manpower roles and between military and civilian manpower utilization--and how these relationships can be integrated in a manpower management model. It also discusses whether such a model would evaluate manning options differently from conventional analysis, i.e., whether it could fundamentally alter Department of Defense (DOD) labor management. The authors outline desirable features for a total force management model, build a rudimentary version of such a model, and exercise it to demonstrate that it can lead to manning policies different from those favored by existing DOD policy. The total force modeling approach they propose has the following features: (1) the management objective is cost-effectiveness; (2) peacetime costs are linked to wartime capability goals by the need to establish and maintain peacetime resource inventories for potential wartime use; (3) different areas of defense endeavor have different combinations of wartime and peacetime capability goals; (4) different categories of manpower are linked by their overlapping capacities to contribute to peacetime performance and wartime capability; (5) a worker's value in defense activities is evaluated in two dimensions; and (6) the costs and capabilities derived from military manning are heavily influenced by limited lateral entry to the military personnel inventories
Consumption increases caused by housing assistance programs : housing assistance supply experiment by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

9 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 101 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report compares and contrasts three methods of providing housing assistance to low-income renters: the public housing program, which actually constructs housing for eligible tenants; the housing allowance program, which supplements the income of eligible tenants on condition that they live in housing that meets minimum standards; and unrestricted cash grants, which unconditionally supplement the income of eligible tenants. The evaluation finds that if the alternative programs serve the same population, impose the same housing standards, and provide the same total subsidy to participants, the allowance program will perform unambiguously better than public housing and conditionally better than cash grants
Price effects of a housing allowance program : a final report of the Housing Assistance Supply Experiment by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

8 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Housing Assistance Supply Experiment (HASE) was undertaken primarily to demonstrate how a full-scale housing allowance program would affect local housing markets; in particular, how it would affect the price of housing services. If program-induced price increases were large, they would disrupt the housing market and divert program subsidies from their intended recipients. In the outcome, however, price effects caused by the experimental program were so small as to be negligible. Section II examines the changes in the price of rental housing services that occurred in the experimental sites during the first three years of the allowance program. Section III determines that the allowance program had such a small effect on housing prices because it caused only a modest increase in housing demand and because housing supply responds to demand shifts with surprising ease. Section IV assesses the generalizability of the price effects found in the HASE sites, and discusses ways in which the results improve the understanding of housing-market behavior
Supply response to the housing allowance program by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Price elasticities of housing supply by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

6 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analyzes the price elasticity of the supply of rental housing services, defined as the percentage increase in supply associated with a one percent increase in price. The purpose of the report is to predict the price changes associated with supply responses to shifts in demand. Section II analyzes each component of supply response separately. It presents price elasticities for the repair, inventory, and occupancy responses to demand shifts. It reviews the literature on all three and offers new estimates for the second and third (the estimates are based on the analysis of Annual Housing Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau reported in Appendix B). Section III combines the three individual supply elasticities into a composite elasticity. It accomplishes the integration using a model of housing-market responses to demand shifts presented in Appendix C. The model was built during the Housing Assistance Supply Experiment to explain the housing market's response to demand shifts caused by an experimental housing allowance program
Welfare caseload dynamics in New York City by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

8 editions published between 1974 and 1975 in English and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shortrun response of housing markets to demand shifts : housing assistance supply experiment by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

7 editions published between 1976 and 1979 in English and held by 96 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents a theory of short-run market adjustments to exogenous demand shifts that is consistent with evidence from the Housing Assistance Supply Experiment (HASE). It is argued that (1) a 1.0 percent shift in rental demand leads to a rent change of only 0.26 percent, whereas capital value can change as much as 5.0 percent; and (2) landlords derive capital value in a tightening market primarily from decreased vacancy loss (because of monopolistic competition among themselves) rather than from increased nominal rent. Using HASE data, the theory predicts that a housing allowance program would cause short-run rent increases of 0.6 to 1.0 percent and capital value increases of 1.6 to 6.5 percent, depending on the size and duration of allowance-induced demand shifts
Middle-Term Aggregate model for projecting Air Force enlisted personnel by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

5 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Middle-Term Aggregate (MTA) model is the component of the Enlisted Force Management System (EFMS) that projects force structure and cost for the aggregate enlisted force (total force across all specialties). The model makes annual projections up to nine fiscal years into the future. The MTA model can be used to examine the force structure and cost implications of the enlisted force that would result from user specified choices of management actions and economic scenario. The force projections carry enough information to describe the enlisted force by category of enlistment, grade, and years of service. At the user's option, the MTA model can provide monthly details within specified fiscal years. The projections depend upon planned management actions and a background economic scenario. The MTA model accepts user choices of the following management actions for each fiscal year of the projection: Accessions, Percent of force receiving enlistment bonuses, Early releases, Forced early reenlistments, and Promotions to the top five grades (E-5 through E-9). Accessions control gains to the enlisted force. Reenlistment bonuses and early releases control losses from the force. Promotions control the grade distribution of the force. The MTA model's projections also are conditional upon user-specified projections of two economic conditions for each fiscal year: Civilian unemployment rate, and Ratio of military wages to civilian wages. The higher civilian unemployment and the higher the ratio of military wages to civilian wages the greater the propensity of enlisted personnel to remain in the enlisted force at the end of each term of enlistment
Short-term aggregate model for projecting Air Force enlisted personnel (SAM) by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

5 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Enlisted Management System is a decision support system designed to assist managers of the enlisted force in setting and meeting force targets. The system contains computer models that project the force resulting from given management actions, so actions that meet targets can be found. Some of those models analyze separate job specialties (disaggregate models), and others analyze the total enlisted force across all specialties (aggregate models); some models make annual projections (middle-term models) and others make monthly projections. The Short-Term Aggregate Inventory Projection Model (SAM) is the component of the EFMS that makes monthly projections (for the rest of the current fiscal year) of the aggregate enlisted force. SAM can be used to analyze the total size, grade composition, and budget cost of the enlisted force during a fiscal year. It supports planning of management actions to achieve user specified end-of-year force levels (known as end strengths) and user specified end-of-year grade levels (known as grade strengths)
Aggregate dynamic analysis model (ADAM) for Air Force Enlisted personnel : User's guide by William T Mickelson( Book )

6 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Aggregate Dynamic Analysis Model (ADAM) projects active duty Air Force enlisted personnel and their budget costs that will result from user- specified management actions and background economic conditions for 12 years into the future. These projections are for the aggregate force (total across all specialties) by pay grade, years of service, and category of enlistment. The management actions include accessions, reenlistment bonuses, early releases, early reenlistments, promotions, and involuntary separations. The background economic conditions controlled for by the model include civilian unemployment rate, ratio of military wages to civilian wages, and the Consumer Price Index. This user's guide volume describes what the model does, explains how to run the mode, and gives example input and output screens. A companion volume, N-3020/2, presents technical documentation for ADAM
ALEC : a model for analyzing the cost-effectiveness of Air Force enlisted personnel policies (documentation and user's guide) by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

4 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Aggregate Lifecycle Effectiveness and Cost (ALEC) model enables managers of Air Force enlisted personnel to compare the cost effectiveness of alternative management actions for a part of the force selected for analysis. Example actions are limits on the numbers of various types of enlistments, reenlistment bonuses designed to increase the number of persons making the Air Force a career, retraining programs that transfer personnel from one specialty to another, and the early-release program. This volume presents the microcomputer model that estimates the cost effectiveness of management actions for a given part of the enlisted force. Model users can evaluate complex combinations of actions and examine specific parts of the enlisted force."--Rand Abstracts
The benchmark separation projection method for predicting monthly losses of Air Force enlisted personnel by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

5 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

RAND is helping to design an Enlisted Force Management System (EFMS) for the Air Force. The efms is a decision support system designed to assist managers of the enlisted force in setting and meeting force targets. The system contains computer models that project the force resulting from given management actions, so actions that meet targets can be found. Some of those models analyze separate job specialties (disaggregate models) and others analyze the total enlisted force across all specialties (aggregate models); some models make annual projections (middle-term models) and others monthly projections. The Short-Term Aggregate Inventory Projection Model (SAM) is the component of the EFMS that makes monthly projections (for the rest of the current fiscal year) of the aggregate enlisted force
Aggregate dynamic analysis model (ADAM) for Air Force Enlisted personnel : Technical documentation by William T Mickelson( Book )

5 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This Note is the second of two volumes describing the Aggregate Dynamic Assessment Model (ADAM), which projects aggregate Air Force enlisted personnel (by category of enlistment, grade, and year of service) 12 years into the future. The Note discusses the theory behind the model, describes the theory's implementation, and presents a complete description of the database. The companion volume, N-3020/1, contains a user's guide for ADAM
 
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Closing the education gap : benefits and costs
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Controlling cocaine : supply versus demand programsModeling the demand for cocaine
Alternative Names
Rydell, C. P.

Rydell, Peter

Languages
English (130)