WorldCat Identities

Southworth, Miles

Overview
Works: 37 works in 84 publications in 3 languages and 550 library holdings
Genres: Dictionaries  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Author, Other
Classifications: Z258, 686.23
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Miles Southworth
Color separation techniques by Miles Southworth( Book )

18 editions published between 1974 and 1989 in English and Spanish and held by 223 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pocket guide to color reproduction : communication & control by Miles Southworth( Book )

10 editions published between 1979 and 1995 in English and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quality and productivity in the graphic arts : how to improve quality, productivity, and profit utilizing a continuous quality improvement program and statistical process control (SPC) by Miles Southworth( Book )

9 editions published between 1989 and 1990 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Color Resource complete color glossary by Miles Southworth( Book )

6 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How to implement total quality management, or, Continuous quality improvement by Miles Southworth( Book )

3 editions published in 1992 in English and Undetermined and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Color separation on the desktop : how to get good color reproductions by Miles Southworth( Book )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leadership : a quick and easy guide by Barbara Birkett( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

La retinatura diretta by Miles Southworth( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in Italian and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glossary of color scanner, color system, & communication terms by Miles Southworth( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reproducción del color en autoedición : cómo conseguir buenas reproducciones de color by Miles Southworth( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in Spanish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Technologija cvetodelenija by Miles Southworth( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in Undetermined and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mise en Scene by Nelson Vigneault( )

1 edition published in 1981 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

None provided
An Investigation into the printing and wear characteristics of laser exposed plates by David Romano( )

1 edition published in 1995 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study investigated the printing and wear characteristics of a popular laser exposed plate, the DuPont Howson Silverlith plate, by imaging one half of the plate in an imagesetter and the other half in a contact frame with a halftone film. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether the method of imaging had an effect on plate durability when run on a press. The comparison between the digital and the film halftones was done at 150 Ipi. The dot areas on the plate were measured twice; once before and once after a press run of 100,000 impressions. Measurements of the initial sizes of the dots on the plate and the final sizes of the dots on the plate proved that the laser dots did wear faster than the contact exposed dots. The comparison between the measurements of the initial sizes of the printed dots and the final sizes of the printed dots did not demonstrate that either method of plate-making produced a more durable image
A model for automatic optical scaling of type designs for conventional and digital technology by Bridget Lynn Johnson( )

1 edition published in 1987 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the history of type design, two methods have been used to scale type-- to produce enlarged or reduced letterforms from a reference size. With original handcut fonts, designers performed optical scaling (scaling by eye) that varied the proportions of letterform features over a range of sizes in a nonlinear manner. That is, letterform feature proportions were size dependent. This was an entirely manual and intuitive process. More recently, however, the use of the lens, as well as computational and other technologies, has allowed letterforms to be scaled automatically from a reference character, a simple proportional enlargement or reduction. To date, little work has been done to combine these two methods, that is to say, to automatically perform nonlinear scaling of a reference character in order to approximate the optical scaling performed by skilled type designers and punchcutters. This research developed a mathematical model of optical scale in type design, consisting of two parts: (1) a model of the scaling of individual letterform features; and (2) a model of the scaling of entire letterforms. The model was tested by applying it to the original handcut fonts that supplied the initial data for the research in order to generate synthetic letterforms. These nonlinear synthetic letterforms were then compared with the originals, as well with proportionally scaled letterforms generated by the model approximated the original optically scaled handcut letterforms. In addition, the performance of the proportionally scaled letterforms was compared with the originals, as well as with the nonlinear, synthetic forms
The Study of paper surface efficiency by Wandee Charoenpholphibool( )

1 edition published in 1989 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Paper surface efficiency (PSE) is a response resulting from the combination of paper gloss and oil absorptivity. A review of previous studies regarding the effect of paper surface efficiency on printed process color appearance is presented. This previous work related densitometric responses to PSE in terms of hue error and grayness. This current study investigated the PSE response in a similar manner, but densitometric responses were replaced by colorimetry. The colorimetric terms used were chroma (C*), huedifference (AH*), and lightness(L*). These correspond to hue error and grayness of the densitometric responses. Simple linear regression models relating the PSE and each response were constructed based on 13 kinds of paper printed with Hint cyan ink. The variable due to paper color was suppressed. The densitometric analysis generated results that verified Preucil's investigation. These found that as the PSE increased, hue error and grayness decreased. The colorimetric analysis indicated a large color difference in the cyan ink due to PSE difference between coated and uncoated papers. This difference was more than 10 AE units. The difference was mainly due to the differences in chroma (AC*) and lightness (AL*); however, there was a small amount of hue-difference (AH*). The linear relationships between PSE vs. C* and PSE vs. L* were established and the correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. This analysis found that the correlations were significant and were used to predict the colorimetric responses (C*, L*) of an ink when printed on papers having different PSE. The models generated with the Flint Inks were tested with 9 additional papers printed at RIT with cyan ink to confirm the results and usefulness of the predictions. This analysis suggested the same concept as the previous one that there is a significant linear correlation between PSE vs. C* and PSE vs. L*- The straight lines that were generated were not the same for the two groups of prints that were in
Control of a four-color lithographic press by monitoring the hue consistency of the reproduction with a densitometer by Chikashi Hashimoto( )

1 edition published in 1979 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable control method to maintain the visual hue consistency of "critical colors" on a four-color lithographic press. The term "critical colors" indicates those colors which are deemed by the customer or pressman to be important for a particular job and will require special attention to maintain their hue consistency. It was hypothesized that a densitometer, which automatically computes hue error and grayness using the Preucil method, could be used to measure critical colors and maintain their computed hue consistency. In order to analyze the effect of the control method monitoring hue error and grayness, the press sheets controlled by this method (the experimental group) were compared with the press sheets controlled by the pressman's visual judgment only (the control group). Colors with different hue and halftone-dot sizes were chosen as critical colors for the experiment. During the production of the experimental group, the hue error values of critical colors were controlled to remain within an arbitrary tolerance of ±4-percent from the measured hue error values on the O.K. sheet, as indicated acceptable by a previous study. From the sample press sheets drawn from the experimental group and the control group, the hue error and grayness values of each critical color were analyzed by three ways: (1) by the comparisons of standard deviation and mean; (2) by F tests; and (3) by utilizing the GATF Color Triangle. The experimental results in the F tests indicated that in most cases there was no significant difference in the variances of the hue error and grayness values of the critical colors between the two groups. However, the comparisons of standard deviation and mean, and the GATF Color Triangles indicated that in most cases the hue error and grayness values of the experimental group varied less and remained closer to the measured values on the O.K. sheet than the control group. It was concluded that a densitometer cou
A cost and performance analysis of the three electronic communication systems currently in use in the printing and publishing industry by Susan Richards( )

1 edition published in 1986 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study describes and evaluates the three electronic graphic communication systems presently used by the printing and publishing industry. The author has selected generic system names for each of the systems. These are: System 1: Page Facsimile System 2: Character-Encoding System 3: Pixel Density-Map Page Facsimile systems are primarily used by newspaper publishers. The Character-Encoding and Pixel Density-Map systems are alternate methods primarily used by newsweekly magazine publishers. All three communication systems offer the user a means of transmitting editorial, and in some cases advertising pages, to remote printing facilities for manufacturing and distribution. Each electronic graphic communication system is investigated in depth. The study provides specific information for the potential user, and the current user. The problem for the user is how to best match the communication system, i.e. how the system operates, the cost and performance of that system, with the user's requirement for transmitting graphic information. Based on the full evaluation of each of the systems in the study, the author concludes the following: System 1: Page Facsimile The Page Facsimile system is relatively simple for the user to install and operate. However, all pages must be prepared as camera ready copy prior to transmission. The component costs for this system design are relatively low. Conversely, the method of encoding generates the most data to be transmitted. As a result, the user is required to use expensive transmission lines. Also, with limited data storage, this system requires the immediate transmission and reception of data. From an overall cost standpoint the Page Facsimile system is the least expensive system in the study -The quality levels attained by this system are best suited for newspaper applications, where the text and 4/color quality requirements of the publications are not paramount. These systems offer the user the many advantages of a full communicat
An investigation of consumers' preference for a typestyle in relation to a display poster by Brad Weaver( )

1 edition published in 1988 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>None provided.</p>
Analysis of color variation during four-color offset lithographic press runs by monitoring changes in three-filter density values of overprint tints by Curtis Smith( )

1 edition published in 1990 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A densitometric method of monitoring color variation during four-color offset lithographic press runs is proposed. Once an 'OK' press sheet has been approved for the run, a standard color reference is established with which successive sheet pulls can be compared. In order to develop an accurate and repeatable system for monitoring and controlling color variation, densitometric analysis of three color overprinted tints can be utilized. In relation to the OK sheet, changes in the three-filter density readings measured at specific points across successive press sheets, indicate the visual change in color hue and strength that occurs during the press run. This work suggests that offset printers could use the following color control technique: zero the densitometer on a seventy percent overprint control point or dark neutral image area of the OK sheet and compare the difference in density of the same point of any sample sheet. The difference will indicate the change in the amount of red, green and blue light being reflected from that point in the sample relative to the OK sheet and suggest the corrective action necessary to control color variability during the press run
Factors affecting the strength and openability of tight backed, adhesive bound, hardcover volumes by Geoffrey Hyatt( )

1 edition published in 1988 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>The practice of tight backing adhesive bound, hard cover books has long been thought to enhance durability at the expense of openability. Tight backing is popular in a number of specialized binding markets, the most notable of which is textbook production. Yet despite their prevalence, there is a lack of information available about how the openability and durability characteristics of tight backed books are affected by variable factors in the production process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three variables involved in the production of tight backed, adhesive bound, hardcover volumes. The three factors considered were bulk of the book block, surface area of adhesive application to the spine and paper stock. Analyses of durability was conducted using two pieces of testing apparatus, the Octagonal Tumbling Drum and the Universal Book Tester. Openability was measured using the Photocopy Openability Test. The statistical design utilized a blocked and replicated three way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), conducted at the 0.05 alpha level. Where the data led to the rejection of the null hypothesis, a Duncan Multiple Range Test was employed to isolate the source of the variation. The procedures determined that bulk had no effect on openability, but became a factor in durability when the book was subjected to severe abuse. Paper stock was deemed to have no significant effect on either durability or openability. With regard to adhesive treatment, an inverted relationship was found to exist between durability and openability. As adhesive coating increased in surface area, durability was enhanced at the expense of openability. This was found to be a non-linear relationship. Finally, it was found that if the proper materials and construction techniques were employed in book production, then bindings with high durability could be created despite effects of other variable factors.</p>
 
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Pocket guide to color reproduction : communication & control
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Leadership : a quick and easy guide
Alternative Names
Sautvort, M.

Southworth, M.

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