WorldCat Identities

Giles, James Richard 1937-

Overview
Works: 47 works in 201 publications in 1 language and 15,845 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Biography‡vDictionaries  Bio-bibliography‡vDictionaries  Reference works  Dictionaries  History  Bio-bibliography  Biography 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: PS379, B
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by James Richard Giles
Irwin Shaw by James Richard Giles( Book )

12 editions published between 1983 and 1991 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,279 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

James Jones by James Richard Giles( Book )

9 editions published between 1981 and 1996 in English and held by 948 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses recurring character types in his works and refutes the charge that he had a "bad" style with unbelievable female characters
Claude McKay by James Richard Giles( Book )

14 editions published between 1976 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 937 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Provides in-depth analysis of the life, works, career, and critical importance of Claude McKay
American novelists since World War II( Book )

14 editions published between 1994 and 2003 in English and held by 799 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains biographical sketches of writers who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then
American novelists since World War II by James Richard Giles( Book )

16 editions published in 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 794 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains biographical sketches of writers who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then
American novelists since World War II( Book )

15 editions published between 1995 and 2011 in English and held by 709 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains biographical sketches of writers who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then
American novelists since World War II by James Richard Giles( Book )

11 editions published in 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 604 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains biographical sketches of writers who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then
American novelists since World War II by James Richard Giles( Book )

11 editions published in 2003 in English and Undetermined and held by 485 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains alphabetically arranged entries that provide career biographies of eighty American authors who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then; each with a list of principal works and a bibliography
Violence in the contemporary American novel : an end to innocence by James Richard Giles( Book )

7 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 454 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Giles demonstrates that American writers have assumed a responsibility not only to record the plague of violence that so threatens the survival of the nation's children but also to seek explanations for its origins. He argues that the violence in these works, which is never portrayed as a positive form of revolutionary action but is instead represented as reactive effect, emerges largely out of ethnic antagonism, racial and gender division, and class oppression." "He contends that the novelists cumulatively offer diversity as an antidote to the initiation and spread of violence, and he concludes that they envision cultural diversity as urban America's opportunity for redemption and hope."--Jacket
Confronting the horror : the novels of Nelson Algren by James Richard Giles( Book )

7 editions published between 1989 and 2012 in English and held by 433 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Because naturalism seems antithetical to modernism and literary existentialism, slight attention has been given to the existence of a contemporary, or post-World War II, naturalism. Indeed, the very term serves as a synonym for old fashioned. While understandable, this view has contributed to the misunderstanding, if not neglect, of several American writers who came to prominence in the late 1940s and 1950s. James Jones coined the term the unfound generation to describe these writers. The career of Nelson Algren exemplifies this phenomenon. Nelson Algren has always been an enigmatic figure, even at the peak of his career. Algren himself was the source of some of the confusion but he was also the victim of a long continuing critical misperception, that as a disciple of Theodore Dreiser he stressed external reality and social protest. In fact, while he never wavered in his commitment to the lumpenproletariat, society's outcasts, his vision evolved significantly, especially through his acquaintance with Sartre, Beauvoir, and Celine. Algren's best work reflects his despair over the absurd at least as much as his outrage over social and economic injustice. In Confronting the Horror, James R. Giles examines the evolution of Algren's major themes--external oppression and internal anxiety. He discusses Algren's fiction in relation to Maxim Gorky's explanation of the lower depths and the works of two contemporary writers, Hubert Selby, Jr., and John Rechy, who combine naturalistic technique with a largely existential, absurdist vision. Giles conclusion is forcefully argued, that Algren's novels are thematically richer and more complex than hitherto regarded and represent the work of an American writer of the first order
The naturalistic inner-city novel in America : encounters with the fat man by James Richard Giles( Book )

9 editions published in 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 423 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

James R. Giles examines the evolution of a literary tradition born with the rise of America's urban centers - American inner-city naturalism. Giles uses narrative distance to measure the evolution of this literary tradition, and he finds that the slum dweller who was introduced - and held at arm's length - by Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, and Jack London assumed center stage in the works of such leading twentieth-century writers as Richard Wright, John Rechy, and Joyce Carol Oates. Giles demonstrates that while Crane, Norris, and London saw the newly emerging ghetto as a source of sensational subject matter, they distanced implied narrators from settings and characters through their use of narrative perspective. He contends that Crane bridges this separation in his 1893 version of Maggie: A Girl of the Streets with the encounter between the grotesque "fat man" and the novel's heroine. According to Giles, this fat man functions as a startling incarnation of the middle-class writer's fascination with, and fear of, a depraved inner city. In contrast, Giles argues that the twentieth-century's most memorable American ghetto novels constitute a process of familiarization with, and humanization of, the slum dweller. Giles reveals this merger of narrative voice, character, and setting in his analysis of novels by Michael Gold, Nelson Algren, Hubert Selby, Rechy, Wright, and Oates. Giles concludes with a discussion of the influence these novels have had on more recent explorations of the American inner city
Approaches to teaching the works of Louise Erdrich( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 370 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The spaces of violence by James Richard Giles( Book )

9 editions published in 2006 in English and Undetermined and held by 297 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"James R. Giles examines 10 contemporary American novels for the unique ways they explore violence and space as interrelated phenomena. These stories take place in settings as diverse as small towns, college campuses, suburbs, the brokerage houses and luxury apartments of Wall Street, football stadiums, Appalachian hills, and America's no-man's-land of Greyhound bus stations and highways. Violence, Giles finds, is mythological and ritualistic in many of these novels, whereas it is treated as systemic and naturalistic in others. Giles locates each of the novels he studies on a continuum from the mythological to the naturalistic and argues that they represent a "fourthspace" at the margins of physical, social, and psychological space, a territory at the cultural borders of the mainstream. These textual spaces are so saturated with violence that they suggest little or no potential for change and affirmation and are as degraded as the physical, social, and mental spaces from which they emerge. A concluding chapter extends the focus of The Spaces of Violence to texts by Jane Smiley, Toni Morrison, Edwidge Danticat, and Chuck Palahniuk, who treat the destructive effects of violence on family structures."--Jacket
Understanding Hubert Selby, Jr. by James Richard Giles( Book )

6 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 293 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the publication in 1964 of his novel Last Exit to Brooklyn, which quickly achieved the status of a cult classic, Hubert Selby, Jr., has held a place as one of the foremost exponents of American underground literature. His work has yet to receive extensive critical attention, in part because of its deliberately shocking subject matter and its resistance to precise classification. In Understanding Huber Selby, Jr., James R. Giles examines the writer's four novels and one collection of short stories to make the case that the full complexity of his fiction has not previously been understood. Giles contends that Selby's writings, which are usually labeled as either "naturalistic" or "surrealistic," represent an innovative merger of both narrative modes. Suggesting that Selby's work echoes not only that of such American naturalists as Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane, and Nelson Algren but also that of major European existentialists, Giles demonstrates the importance of Franz Kafka, Isaac Babel, Jean Genet, Albert Camus, and especially Celine to Selby's aesthetic. Giles argues that the novelist's merging of naturalism and existentialism produces a unique narrative perspective on the pain and desperation of the alienated urban American male and a portrayal of the exploited, powerless urban outcast that is unexcelled in American fiction
The James Jones reader : outstanding selections from his war writings by James Jones( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Twenty-first-century American novelists( Book )

6 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The fiction of the 21st century has broadened the reach of the novel into increasingly personal, individual, and nontraditional literary purviews. Regional realists have become a particularly strong voice, with language becoming increasingly conversational, and with increased effects of an ever more complex society on the individual. Contemporary American fiction continues to assert the complexity and broad span of the nation and its many voices
American novelists since World War II( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study of the concept of atavism in the writings of Rudyard Kipling, Frank Norris, and Jack London by James Richard Giles( )

7 editions published between 1967 and 1980 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

American novelists since World War II by James Kibler( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contains biographical sketches of writers who either began writing novels after 1945 or have done their most important work since then
American novelists since World War II( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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American novelists since World War IIAmerican novelists since World War II
Alternative Names
Giles, James R.

Giles, James R. 1937-

Giles, James R. (James Richard), 1937-

Languages
English (157)

Covers
American novelists since World War IIAmerican novelists since World War IIViolence in the contemporary American novel : an end to innocenceThe naturalistic inner-city novel in America : encounters with the fat manApproaches to teaching the works of Louise ErdrichThe spaces of violenceUnderstanding Hubert Selby, Jr.Twenty-first-century American novelistsAmerican novelists since World War II