WorldCat Identities

United States Agency for International Development Office of Women in Development

Overview
Works: 216 works in 405 publications in 1 language and 8,197 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Literatures  Conference papers and proceedings 
Classifications: HQ1870.9, 305.4091724
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Most widely held works by United States
Women of the world : Latin America and the Caribbean by Elsa Chaney( Book )

6 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 392 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The first in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 21 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Beginning with an overview of population characteristics of the regions, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text, but also in narrative form, offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of the data assembled on each variable. Findings show that while the death rate does not vary significantly by subregion (the Caribbean, Middle America, and South America), differences in population growth result from variations in levels of fertility and international migration, with birth rates being relatively high in Middle America, where emigration is lower, and lower in the Caribbean, where emigration is higher. While the differences in literacy rates between the sexes are substantial, the gap between urban and rural rates for either sex is larger still. Statistics showed a far lower participation of women than men in the formal labor force. Women's principal power and influence continue to be exercised in the domains of the family and the household, even though increasing numbers are entering the work force. Appendices contain a bibliography listing over 200 documents; a list of tables in the Women in Development Data Base; and tables showing population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence. (Lh)
Women of the world : a chartbook for developing regions by U.S. Department of Commerce( Book )

4 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 372 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women of the world : Near East and North Africa by Mary Chamie( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 355 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The third in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 14 countries in the Near East and North Africa. Beginning with an overview of population distribution and changes in the region, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text but also in narrative form offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of data assembled on each variable. Findings show that there are more women in the working age group (ages 15-64) in labor exporting countries, with more men in this group in labor importing countries. The Middle South Asia subregion has higher crude birth and death rates than North Africa and Western South Asia. Because more men than women migrate, the working age population remaining in rural areas is dominated by women. Although there are substantial differences in both literacy and school enrollment rates among men and women, improvements have been evidenced by higher percentages of literate and enrolled women among the younger age groups. Statistics also show a far lower participation of women than men in the labor force. Appendices contain a list of over 100 publications; information on data sources; a list of tables; and information on population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence. (Lh)
Women of the world : Sub-Saharan Africa by Jeanne S Newman( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 344 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The second in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 40 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Beginning with an overview of population characteristics in the region, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text, but also in narrative form, offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of the data assembled on each variable. Findings show that except in Nigeria, the populations of Sub-Saharan African countries are not large and rural densities are not usually high. However, the population is growing rapidly, at about three percent per year. The proportion of women in the working ages is lower in the urban and higher in the rural areas than is that of men. There appear to be subregional differences in female literacy: rates tend to be higher in the Eastern and Southern regions than in West Africa, and the female disadvantage relative to males is smaller. Moreover, male labor force participation is uniformly high in the region, while female participation is lower and highly variable. Plural marriage is common in many countries of the region; in 10 of the 12 countries with data on polygamy, one-fifth to one-third of the married men had two or more wives. Appendices contain references, tables, and information on population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence. (Lh)
Women of the world : Asia and the Pacific by Nasra M Shah( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 339 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The fourth in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 14 countries of Asia and the Pacific. Beginning with an overview of population distribution and changes in the region, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text but also in narrative forms offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of the data assembled on each variable. Findings show that the Asian region contains two of the world's largest countries, Mainland China and India, which together are the home of 37 percent of the earth's inhabitants. In contrast, the Pacific island nations are relatively small. Compared to other parts of the developing world, the youth (under age 15) dependency burden in Asia as a whole is low, due largely to rapidly declining family size in East Asia and Mainland China. In all countries, men outpace women in the ability to read and write, although literacy is considerably higher among younger women. In addition, there are large female/male differences in rates of economic activity in both rural and urban areas, and marriage continues to be a prime determinant of women's status throughout much of Asia. Appendices contain references; sources of data; tables; information on population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence; and abbreviations. (Lh)
Illustrative statistics on women in selected developing countries by Thomas Lorimer( Book )

10 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Data pertaining to some basic aspects of women's participation in selected developing countries are presented in 13 charts, arranged alphabetically by region and country within region. Countries in each of the three major developing regions--Africa, Asia, and Latin America--are included when possible. Each chart presents data for a single topic in the following sequence: age of women, residence, longevity, childhood mortality, age at marriage, marital status, fertility, literacy, school enrollment, school completion, labor force participation, sector of employment, and professional occupations. Charts contain one or more indicators of women's status and, where appropriate, a ratio indicator value for women divided by the corresponding indicator value for men so that a measure of the status of women relative to that of men is provided. (Ah)
Women in Poland by Victoria Averil Velkoff( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 257 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Images of women in the literatures of selected developing countries (Ghana, Senegal, Haiti, Jamaica) by Kathleen M McCaffrey( Book )

6 editions published between 1978 and 1981 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in migration : a third world focus by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

9 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 157 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Spurred in part by the apparent contradiction between recent data on the magnitude of autonomous female migration and the lack of acknowledgment of that data in recent literature, a 1979 study attempted to define women migrants in 46 Third World Countries in terms of age, marital status, socioeconomic status, factors motivating migration, and effects of migration. Because data from publications, national censuses, and studies frequently did not focus on autonomous female migrants, researchers constructed a sex differential migration index. While many regional differences existed in the areas studied (Africa, Asia, Central America, the Middle East, South America), female outmigration generally dominated only among migrants over age 50. Most female migrants were adolescent, in their early twenties, or over 50. Most were single and had less education than male migrants. A growing percentage migrated, often in step-wise fashion, for economic reasons. Having migrated to urban areas, many female migrants found themselves in low-paying, low status jobs. Researchers noted increased family responsibilities for female migrants and for rural wives of male migrants, and the weakening effect of serious economic dimensions of women's migration and on autonomous female migration. (Sb)
Keeping women out : a structural analysis of women's employment in developing countries by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

7 editions published between 1980 and 1989 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The comparative functionality of formal and non-formal education for women : final report by Vivian Lowery Derryck( Book )

6 editions published between 1979 and 1981 in English and held by 151 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This final report describes a five-phase study to ascertain whether formal or non-formal education has the greater functionality to accelerate women's integration into development activities. Part 1 (two chapters), introduction and background, defines the problem, sets parameters of the study, and provides definitions of education terms. Part 2 (three chapters) examines the history of United States education and schooling in colonial Africa to gain historic perspective. Focus is on female edocation in nineteenth-century America, the rise of the common school, and colonial education in Africa. Part 3 (two chapters) overviews formal and nonformal education and discusses the status of women and education. Part 4 (four chapters) examines three types of education functionality (social, economic, and demographic) and analyzes each for formal and non-formal education. It concludes with a summary of functionalities and dysfunctionalities. Part 5 (three chapters) explores constraints of the political environment and speculates about possible outcomes of a major investment in female education. Again, the focus is sub-Saharan Africa. Part 6 (four chapters) offers recommendations for actions to attack the problem of female under-education. The final part summarizes major study findings and concludes with observations on the current relationship of education and women in development efforts. (Ylb)
Jobs for women in rural industry and services by Ruth Dixon-Mueller( Book )

5 editions published between 1979 and 1981 in English and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The productivity of women in developing countries : measurement issues and recommendations by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

6 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in development : 1980 report to the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs, United States House of Representatives by United States( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in forestry for local community development : a programming guide by Marilyn W Hoskins( Book )

3 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in international migration : issues inn development planning by Elsa Chaney( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 139 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Limits to productivity : improving women's access to technology and credit by Ilsa Schumacher( Book )

7 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 138 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While there is significant variation in women's economic participation rates across cultures and situations in Third World countries, the common features in work patterns of poor women are striking. Segmented labor markets predominate throughout the developing world and restrict the demand for female labor to subsistence activities or to jobs in sectors of the market economy with low pay and status, limited tenure, and few chances for upward mobility. Low income women are most often engaged in household and market work, which is time consuming, inefficient, and intermittent; and their activities use few modern tools and skills and entail little or no capital investment. Poor working women, more than men, lack the benefits of productive resources, which increase productivity and economic returns to labor. This occurs because of women's place in the structure of technology and credit use--women are not in a position to have access to these productive resources in their modern forms. Women do not demand modern technology and credit because of several factors: lack of information concerning the availability of credit or technology; limited opportunity for profitable investments; cultural constraints that restrict women in interacting with male bank officials or extension agents; and lastly, women's lack of control over other economic resources, such as land or other property, which realistically prevents them from demanding their resources. Policy changes need to be made to improve women's access to technology and credit in the Third World--both through general development of resources and through specific strategies to help women. (Such strategies are suggested in this report.) (Kc)
Women's organizations in rural development by Kathleen A Staudt( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bringing women in : towards a new direction in occupational skills training for women by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report focuses on the short term basic and occupational skills training needs of rural and urban poor women in developing countries who have had no schooling or those who have entered and/or have completed primary schooling. It is organized into three parts. Part 1 deals with the rationale for training women in occupational skills and examines salient issues of the current status of vocational training for women. Part 2 addresses the question of access, that is, constraints that women face in obtaining and making use of training. In part 3 a brief discussion addresses the concerns within usaid (United States Agency for International Development) regarding employment and income-generation skills training and highlights implications for women. A series of recommendations to deal with many of the issues discussed are presented. (Ylb)
Women and energy : program implications by Irene Tinker( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
AID/WID

G/WID

Office of Women in Development United States, Agency for International Development

United States. Agency for International Development. Bureau for Global Programs, Field Support, and Research. Office of Women in Development

United States. Agency for International Development. Women in Development Office

United States Office of Women in Development

United States Women in Development Office

WID

Women in Development Office of USAID

Languages
English (115)