WorldCat Identities

Relyea, Harold

Overview
Works: 137 works in 461 publications in 1 language and 7,974 library holdings
Genres: History  Legislative histories  Abstracts  Biography 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Harold Relyea
Freedom of information trends in the information age( Book )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The presidency and information policy by Harold Relyea( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 395 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal information policies in the 1990s : views and perspectives by Peter Hernon( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 355 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book uses a cross-disciplinary approach to profile developments through November 1995 concerning important U.S. government information policy issues. Information policy analyses benefit from a historical perspective while seeking to identify current areas of agreement and disagreement, especially at a time when the United States is moving from traditional paper formats to electronic modes and the adoption of a national information infrastructure. Ideology, politics, and opinion must be tempered by empirical assessment and open public debate. The study of U.S. government information policy can identify options for policymakers and others attempting to better understand and address key issues. The book includes chapters on the following topics: (1) "Government Information Policy in a Time of Uncertainty and Change"; (2) "The Clinton Administration and the National Information Infrastructure (nii)"; (3) "Congress and Information Issues"; (4) "Access to the Judicial Branch"; (5) "An Executive Branch Perspective on Managing Information Resources"; (6) "Federal Information Resources Management: Integrating Information Management and Technology"; (7) "Privacy"; (8) "National Security Information Policy after the End of the Cold War"; (9) "Freedom of Information Revisited"; (10) "U.S. Scientific and Technical Information Policy"; (11) "Geographic Information Systems"; (12) "The Depository Library Program: Another Component of the Access Puzzle Shifting to Electronic Formats"; (13) "Managing Archival Records in the Electronic Age: Fundamental Challenges"; and (14) "Moving to the Networked Information Environment: New Challenges and Issues." Also contains biographical information about the contributors and author and subject indices. (Author/SWC)
United States government information policies : views and perspectives( Book )

5 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 345 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Government in the sunshine act--S. 5 (Public law 94-409) : source book, legislative history, texts, and other documents( Book )

7 editions published between 1976 and 1977 in English and held by 332 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A brief history of emergency powers in the United States : a working paper : prepared for the Special Committee on National Emergencies and Delegated Emergency Powers, United States Senate by Harold Relyea( Book )

5 editions published between 1974 and 2005 in English and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Silencing science : national security controls and scientific communication by Harold Relyea( Book )

6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Executive branch reorganization by Harold Relyea( Book )

16 editions published between 1993 and 2001 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Executive branch reorganization and management initiatives by Harold Relyea( Book )

15 editions published between 2002 and 2008 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report provides a brief overview of recent executive branch reorganization actions and related management initiatives. It reviews the relevant plans and preparations of President-elect Barack Obama as the new Administration transitions to assuming management efforts of the executive branch. Briefly examined, as well, are the organization and management efforts of the most recent regimes. President George W. Bush came to office from a campaign which had emphasized efficiency in government, particularly through the use of information technology, but revealed no plans for executive branch reorganization. The Clinton Administration had conducted an active effort at "reinventing government," spearheaded by a National Performance Review (NPR) announced shortly after the 1993 inauguration. The NPR produced a series of reports proposing various organizational and operational reforms
The vice presidency of the United States : evolution of the modern office by Harold Relyea( Book )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Informing Congress : the role of the executive branch in times of war by Harold Relyea( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 160 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public printing reform : issues and actions by Harold Relyea( Book )

9 editions published between 2001 and 2004 in English and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Statutory provisions governing public printing by the federal government, including production, dissemination, management, and oversight, are largely concentrated in the initial chapters of Title 44 of the United States Code. Much of the content of the public printing chapters of Title 44 derives from the Printing Act of 1895, the first comprehensive government printing law. This body of law has been amended and modified by Congress from time to time to accommodate changing technology and policy developments. During the past two decades, however, monumental challenges have arisen which have prompted a reconsideration of government printing policy and practice and the provisions of Title 44 prescribing them. This report discusses recent legal, management, policy, and technological challenges to the GPO printing system, reviews the printing reform efforts of the 105th and 106th Congresses, and tracks current efforts to address existing problems
Security classified and controlled information by Harold Relyea( )

9 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The security classification regime in use within the federal executive branch traces its origins to Armed Forces information protection practices of the World War I era. The classification system -- designating information, according to prescribed criteria and procedures, protected in accordance with one of three levels of sensitivity, based on the amount of harm to the national security that would result from its disclosure -- attained a presidential character in 1940 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued the initial executive order prescribing these information security arrangements. Refinements in the creation, management, and declassification of national security information followed over the succeeding decades, and continue today. In many regards, these developments represent attempts to narrow the bases and discretion for assigning official secrecy to executive branch documents and materials. Limiting the quantity of security classified information has been thought to be desirable for a variety of important reasons: (1) promoting an informed citizenry, (2) effectuating accountability for government policies and practices, (3) realizing oversight of government operations, and (4) achieving efficiency and economy in government management. But because security classification was not possible for some kinds of information deemed in some quarters to be "sensitive," other kinds of designations or markings came to be applied to alert federal employees regarding its privileged or potentially harmful character. Sometimes these markings derived from statutory provisions requiring the protection of a type of information; others were administratively authorized with little detail about their use. In the current environment, still affected by the long shadow of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, several issues have arisen regarding security classified and controlled information. This report examines these issues
Presidential advisers' testimony before Congressional committees : a brief overview by Harold Relyea( )

4 editions published between 2002 and 2008 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the beginning of the federal government, Presidents have called upon executive branch officials to provide them with advice regarding matters of policy and administration. While Cabinet members were among the first to play such a role, the creation of the Executive Office of the President (EOP) in 1939 and the various agencies located within that structure resulted in a large increase in the number and variety of presidential advisers. All senior staff members of the White House Office and the leaders of the various EOP agencies and instrumentalities could be said to serve as advisers to the President. Occasionally, these executive branch official playing a presidential advisory role have been called upon to testify before congressional committees and subcommittees. sometimes, such invited appearances have been prompted by allegations of personal misconduct on the part of the official, but they have also included instances when accountability for policymaking and administrative or managerial actions have instigated the request for testimony. Because such appearances before congressional committees or subcommittees seemingly could result in demands for advice proffered to the President, or the disclosure -- inadvertent or otherwise -- of such advice, there has been resistance, from time to time, by the Chief Executive to allowing such testimony. Congress has a constitutionally rooted right of access to the information it needs to perform its Article I legislative and oversight functions. Generally, a congressional committee with jurisdiction over the subject matter, which is conducting an authorized investigation for legislative or oversight purposes, has a right to information held by the executive branch in the absence of either a valid claim of constitutional privilege by the executive or a statutory provision whereby Congress has limited its constitutional right of information. A congressional committee may request (informally or by a letter from the committee chair, perhaps co-signed by the ranking Member) or demand (pursuant to subpoena) the testimony of a presidential adviser. However, Congress may encounter legal and political problems in attempting to enforce a subpoena to a presidential adviser. Conflicts concerning congressional requests or demands for executive branch testimony or documents often involve extensive negotiations and may be resolved by some form of compromise at to, inter alia, the scope of the testimony or information to be provided to Congress
Access to government information in the United States by Harold Relyea( )

8 editions published between 1991 and 2007 in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes -- the Freedom of Information Act (FOI Act or FOIA; 5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) -- and two meetings access statutes -- the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA; 5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve "political questions" involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion
The executive office of the president : an historical overview by Harold Relyea( )

13 editions published between 1993 and 2008 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Established in 1939, the Executive Office of the President (EOP) consists of a group of federal agencies immediately serving the President. Among the oldest of these are the White House Office, where many of the President's personal assistants are located, and the Office of Management and Budget, which was established as the Bureau of the Budget in 1921 and by transfer became one of the original EOP units in 1939. Entities have been placed within the EOP by both presidential action and congressional determination. Some components have endured; others have been brief experiments. Some have been transferred to other quarters of the executive branch; others have been abolished with no successor. In large measure, the tenure and durability of an Executive Office agency is dependent upon its usefulness to the President -- as a managerial or coordinative auxiliary, a national symbol, or a haven of political patronage, among other considerations. This report reviews the particular circumstances of the creation of, and underlying authority for, the Executive Office of the President, and provides profiles of the entities that have been, and still are, located within that enclave
The National Performance Review by Harold Relyea( Book )

5 editions published between 1993 and 2002 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board : 109th Congress proposed refinements by Harold Relyea( )

9 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Among the recommendations made by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (9/11 Commission) in its final report was the creation of a board within the executive branch to oversee adherence to guidelines on, and the commitment to defend, civil liberties by the federal government. This report examines the realization of this recommendation with the creation of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, and efforts in the 109th Congress to refine the mandate and the mission of the board (H.R. 1310). This report will be updated as events warrant
Government at the dawn of the 21st century by Harold Relyea( Book )

5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Electronic government and electronic signatures by Harold Relyea( Book )

6 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Federal information policies in the 1990s : views and perspectives
Covers
United States government information policies : views and perspectivesA brief history of emergency powers in the United States : a working paper : prepared for the Special Committee on National Emergencies and Delegated Emergency Powers, United States SenateSilencing science : national security controls and scientific communicationThe vice presidency of the United States : evolution of the modern officeInforming Congress : the role of the executive branch in times of warSecurity classified and controlled informationThe National Performance ReviewGovernment at the dawn of the 21st centuryElectronic government and electronic signatures
Alternative Names
Relyea, Harold C.

レリア, ハロルド・C

Languages
English (138)