WorldCat Identities

Shipman, Pat 1949-

Overview
Works: 59 works in 281 publications in 8 languages and 13,702 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography 
Roles: Author, Other
Classifications: GN285, 573.3
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Pat Shipman
The Neanderthals : changing the image of mankind by Erik Trinkaus( Book )

31 editions published between 1992 and 2008 in 3 languages and held by 1,752 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1856, at the very time when Charles Darwin was writing The Origin of Species, which would popularize the revolutionary concept of evolution worldwide, the fossilized remains of a stocky, powerful, human-like creature were discovered in a German valley called Neandertal. The bones were believed by some scientists to have belonged to a primitive version of modern man. But how old were they? Thus began a controversy that has continued to this day, swirling around the origins and interpretation of the Neandertals, placing them at every possible location on our family tree. Now, Erik Trinkaus, one of the world's leading experts on Neandertals, has collaborated with the noted scientist and writer Pat Shipman on a sweeping and definitive examination of what we know and how we've come to know it. Neandertals, who clearly represent a phase of human evolution, possessed their own unique qualities that made them neither chimpanzee nor modern human. The nature of those qualities - and how Neandertals were discovered, debated, studied, and analyzed over the years - is presented with authority and anecdotal richness. The story ranges from the days of Georges Cuvier (known as "Magician of the Charnel House" for his ability to reconstruct from piles of bones a whole animal skeleton) to the latest researchers whose work with DNA has raised the possibility that we are all descended from one African woman (the "Eve" theory). The controversy carries over from the elite scientific societies of Victorian England and nineteenth-century universities in France and Germany to American laboratories. Along the way there are anthropologists painfully accumulating specimens in digs as distant as Belgium and South Africa, Java and the hills outside Beijing, gradually building up a substantial base for legitimate theorizing (illegitimate, too - the tale of the Piltdown hoax is an enlightening interlude). A contentious, combative saga unfolds of vested interests and accepted wisdom clashing with empirical evidence and informal guesses, for as the authors make clear, no one has ever found it easy to be objective about Neandertals. Opinions have veered wildly over time: Neandertals were hardly human, almost apes; they were human, but pathological and not ancient; they were cannibals and shuffling, depraved half-wits; they were indistinguishable (given a shave and a haircut) from your next-door neighbor; they were an evolutionary dead end. In short, they were what we wanted them to be. The Neandertals is an important contribution both to the literature of prehistory and to our understanding of the way subjective wishes and irrelevant moral assumptions can distort even the most serious scientific endeavors
The evolution of racism : human differences and the use and abuse of science by Pat Shipman( Book )

21 editions published between 1994 and 2002 in 3 languages and held by 1,449 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A history of evolutionary theory and ideas about race and racism - explains the original controversy over evolution in Darwin's time; the corruption of evolutionary theory into eugenics; the conflict between laboratory research in genetics and field work in physical anthrolpology and biology, which gave rise to the "new synthesis" of modern evolutionary biology, which in turn cast new light on the age-old debate over nature versus nurture; and the continuing controversies over the heritability of intelligence, criminal behavior, and other traits
The wisdom of the bones : in search of human origins by Alan Walker( Book )

10 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 1,394 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A remarkable discovery was made a decade ago on a dig in northern Kenya. When all the bone and skull fragments were painstakingly pieced together, they revealed the nearly complete skeleton of a teenage male (nicknamed Nariokotome boy, after a nearby sand river). Faced with the best-ever specimen of Homo erectus - a species long identified as the proverbial missing link between apes and humans - paleoanthropologist Alan Walker embarked on a long-term investigation of that species's nature. In this book, telling the story of that inquiry, he introduces us to his ever surprising, deeply engrossing world
Taking wing : Archaeopteryx and the evolution of bird flight by Pat Shipman( Book )

20 editions published between 1998 and 2008 in English and Chinese and held by 1,243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1861, just a few years after the publication of Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species, a scientist named Hermann von Meyer made an amazing discovery. Hidden in the Bavarian region of Germany was a fossil skeleton so exquisitely preserved that its wings and feathers were as obvious as its reptilian jaws and tail. This transitional creature offered tangible proof of Darwin's theory of evolution. Hailed as First Bird by its champions and dismissed by detractors as just another ancient reptile - or even a grand hoax - Archaeopteryx has remained the subject of heated debates in the scientific community for nearly 140 years. In Taking Wing, Pat Shipman offers a compelling account of how scientific thinking about the mysteries of flight developed up to the present day. Flight, it seems, evolved three times - in birds, bats, and pterosaurs. Shipman's story unfolds twice - through the braided tales of the evolutionary record and the scientists who have so painstakingly pieced it together
The man who found the missing link : Eugène Dubois and his lifelong quest to prove Darwin right by Pat Shipman( Book )

14 editions published between 2001 and 2007 in English and Dutch and held by 1,132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Dubois family motto, "Recte et fortiter," means straight and strong, and Dubois lived it to the letter. He willfully abandoned his home and promising career at the University of Amsterdam to drag his wife and baby daughter halfway around the world to search the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) for the legendary missing link. After five years, two weeks, and three days of life-threatening work, Dubois' excavations yielded the missing link. It was a form he called Pithecanthropus erectus, a heavily fossilized skullcap, tooth, and femur (thigh hone) of an ape-man the like of which the world had never seen." "Drawing on Dubois' personal archives, to which she has had unprecedented access, Pat Shipman sets the historic and scientific record right in this dramatic and moving biography. In her revisionist view, Dubois is the unrecognized father of modern paleoanthropology (the science of human origins and evolution), one of the greatest discoverers of human origins. He was much more than just a fossil-finder; he was a scientist of genius."--Jacket
To the heart of the Nile : Lady Florence Baker and the exploration of central Africa by Pat Shipman( Book )

22 editions published between 2004 and 2014 in English and Spanish and held by 1,071 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A portrait drawn from historical documents discusses the nineteenth-century adventurer's rescue from slavery, her education under and marriage to English adventurer Sam Baker, and her life in the uncharted interior of Africa
The animal connection : a new perspective on what makes us human by Pat Shipman( Book )

6 editions published in 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 871 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why do humans all over the world take in and nurture other animals? This behavior might seem maladaptive--after all, every mouthful given to another species is one that you cannot eat--but in this heartening new study, acclaimed anthropologist Pat Shipman reveals that our propensity to domesticate and care for other animals is in fact among our species' greatest strengths. For the last 2.6 million years, Shipman explains, humans who coexisted with animals enjoyed definite adaptive and cultural advantages. To illustrate this point, Shipman gives us a tour of the milestones in human civilization--from agriculture to art and even language--and describes how we reached each stage through our unique relationship with other animals. The Animal Connection reaffirms our love of animals as something both innate and distinctly human, revealing that the process of domestication not only changed animals but had a resounding impact on us as well.--From publisher description
Femme fatale : love, lies, and the unknown life of Mata Hari by Pat Shipman( Book )

13 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 868 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A portrait of the notorious early twentieth-century spy considers the theory that she may have been innocent of the charges for which she was executed, in an account that profiles her as a complicated seducer of men who had an unusual talent for manipulation
The human skeleton by Pat Shipman( Book )

11 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and German and held by 836 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uitgebreide en gedetailleerde beschrijving van de anatomie en de funtie van het menselijk skelet
Life history of a fossil : an introduction to taphonomy and paleoecology by Pat Shipman( Book )

16 editions published between 1981 and 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 732 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The invaders : how humans and their dogs drove Neanderthals to extinction by Pat Shipman( Book )

10 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 571 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Invaders musters compelling evidence to show that the major factor in the Neanderthals' demise was direct competition with newly arriving humans. Drawing on insights from the field of invasion biology, which predicts that the species ecologically closest to the invasive predator will face the greatest competition, Pat Shipman traces the devastating impact of a growing human population: reduction of Neanderthals' geographic range, isolation into small groups, and loss of genetic diversity. But modern humans were not the only invaders who competed with Neanderthals for big game. Shipman reveals fascinating confirmation of humans' partnership with the first domesticated wolf-dogs soon after Neanderthals first began to disappear. This alliance between two predator species, she hypothesizes, made possible an unprecedented degree of success in hunting large Ice Age mammals--a distinct and ultimately decisive advantage for humans over Neanderthals at a time when climate change made both groups vulnerable."--Publisher's Web site
The ape in the tree : an intellectual and natural history of Proconsul by Alan Walker( Book )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 511 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book offers a unique insider's perspective on the unfolding discovery of a crucial link in our evolution: Proconsul, a fossil ape named whimsically after a performing chimpanzee called Consul." "The Ape in the Tree is written in the voice of Alan Walker, whose involvement with Proconsul began when his graduate supervisor analyzed the tree-climbing adaptations in the arm and hand of this extinct creature. Today, Proconsul is the best-known fossil ape in the world." "The history of ideas is set against the vivid adventures of Walker's fossil-hunting expeditions in remote regions of Africa, where the team met with violent thunderstorms, dangerous wildlife, and people isolated from the Western world. Analysis of the thousands of new Proconsul specimens they recovered provides revealing glimpses of the life of this last common ancestor between apes and humans."--BOOK JACKET
The wisdom of bones : in search of human origins by Alan Walker( Book )

18 editions published between 1996 and 1999 in 4 languages and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A groundbreaking book which leading on from the discovery of Homo Erectus, that this being was an animal trapped in a human body and had mastered the trick of growing a large brain. But to Walker's surprise the being was speechless, challenging the existing theory that the language acquisition marks the origins of man
The man who found the missing link : the extraordinary life of Eugène Dubois by Pat Shipman( Book )

8 editions published between 2000 and 2002 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To the heart of the Nile : Florence Baker's extraordinary life from the harem to the heart of Africa by Pat Shipman( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The man who found the missing link : the life and times of Eugene Dubois by Pat Shipman( Book )

3 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reconstructing the paleoecology and taphonomic history of Ramapithecus wickeri at Fort Ternan, Kenya by Pat Shipman( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The invaders : how humans and their dogs drove Neanderthals to extinction by Pat Shipman( )

4 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Approximately 200,000 years ago, as modern humans began to radiate out from their evolutionary birthplace in Africa, Neanderthals were already thriving in Europe-descendants of a much earlier migration of the African genus Homo. But when modern humans eventually made their way to Europe 45,000 years ago, Neanderthals suddenly vanished. Ever since the first Neanderthal bones were identified in 1856, scientists have been vexed by the question, why did modern humans survive while their evolutionary cousins went extinct? The Invaders musters compelling evidence to show that the major factor in the Neanderthals' demise was direct competition with newly arriving humans. Drawing on insights from the field of invasion biology, Pat Shipman traces the devastating impact of a growing human population, reduction of Neanderthals' geographic range, isolation into small groups, and loss of genetic diversity. But modern humans were not the only invaders who competed with Neanderthals for big game. Shipman reveals fascinating confirmation of humans' partnership with the first domesticated wolf-dogs soon after Neanderthals first began to disappear. This alliance between two predator species, she hypothesizes, made possible an unprecedented degree of success in hunting large Ice Age mammals-a distinct and ultimately decisive advantage for humans over Neanderthals at a time when climate change made both groups vulnerable
The last Neandertal( Visual )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2015 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Among scientists, Africa is the undisputed birthplace of humanity. But anthropologists are split into two camps over other questions. How many waves of Homo sapiens migrated out of Africa? Did other highly developed hominid species--such as Homo neanderthalensis--make the same journey? And to what extent did these populations mingle and compete with each other? This program featuring prominent voices in the ongoing debate, presents differing viewpoints about the age and development of the Neandertal--and about how the vanished species figures in the story of modern humanity's rise
Die Neandertaler : Spiegel der Menschheit by Erik Trinkaus( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in German and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The evolution of racism : human differences and the use and abuse of science
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シップマン, パット

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The evolution of racism : human differences and the use and abuse of scienceThe wisdom of the bones : in search of human originsTaking wing : Archaeopteryx and the evolution of bird flightThe man who found the missing link : Eugène Dubois and his lifelong quest to prove Darwin rightTo the heart of the Nile : Lady Florence Baker and the exploration of central AfricaThe animal connection : a new perspective on what makes us humanFemme fatale : love, lies, and the unknown life of Mata HariThe human skeleton