WorldCat Identities

Rosenstone, Steven J.

Overview
Works: 84 works in 182 publications in 1 language and 4,218 library holdings
Genres: History  Lists‡vCode numbers  Software 
Classifications: JK2261, 324.2420973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Steven J Rosenstone Publications about Steven J Rosenstone
Publications by  Steven J Rosenstone Publications by Steven J Rosenstone
Most widely held works by Steven J Rosenstone
Third parties in America : citizen response to major party failure by Steven J Rosenstone ( Book )
13 editions published between 1984 and 1996 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,510 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Who votes? by Raymond E Wolfinger ( Book )
11 editions published between 1977 and 1980 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Forecasting presidential elections by Steven J Rosenstone ( Book )
8 editions published between 1979 and 1983 in English and held by 579 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Mobilization, participation, and democracy in America by Steven J Rosenstone ( Book )
13 editions published between 1993 and 2003 in English and held by 420 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
American national election study, 1994 : post-election survey (enhanced with 1992 and 1993 data) by Steven J Rosenstone ( Book )
5 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Data collection derived from a national survey of the attitudes and behavior of the American electorate. Respondents were asked about their involvement and interest in the 1994 congressional campaigns; whether or how they voted; and about their knowledge of issue positions held by the president and candidates. Evaluations of Congress' and President Clinton's performances as well as demographic characteristics were also ascertained. Other items in the series include questions on partisanship, values, racial and other social issues. Approximately half of the cases in this data collection are empaneled respondents first interviewed in 1992 and 1993; variables associated with those earlier surveys are included as well
Voter turnout in midterm elections by Steven J Rosenstone ( Book )
2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
American National Election Study, 1996 Pre- and Post-Election Survey by Steven J Rosenstone ( )
7 editions published between 1997 and 2000 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1996 National Election Study contains both pre- and post-election components. The Pre-Election Survey includes interviews in which approximately 77 percent of the cases are comprised of empaneled respondents first interviewed in either AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067) or in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1994: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1992 AND 1993 DATA] (ICPSR 6507). The other 23 percent of the pre-election cases are a freshly drawn cross-section sample. Of the 1,714 citizens who were interviewed during the pre-election stage, 1,534 (89.5 percent) also participated in the Post-Election Survey (1,197 of these were panel cases and 337 were cross-section). The content of the 1996 Election Study reflects its dual function, both as the traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a panel study. Substantive themes presented in the 1996 questionnaires include interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, information about politics, evaluation of the presidential candidates and placement of presidential candidates on various issue dimensions, partisanship and evaluations of the political parties, knowledge of and evaluation of House candidates, political participation (including turnout in the presidential primaries and in the November general election and other forms of electoral campaign activity),... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06896
American National Election Study Pooled Senate Election Study, 1988, 1990, 1992 ( )
5 editions published between 1991 and 1999 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This data collection, focusing on Senate elections, combines data from a three-part series (1988, 1990, 1992) of Senate studies. Over the course of these three elections voters in each of the 50 states were interviewed, and data were gathered on citizen evaluations of all senators at three stages of their six-year election cycles. Both survey data and contextual data for all 50 states are included. The survey data facilitate the comparison of House of Representatives and Senate races through the use of questions that generally parallel those questions used in election studies since 1978 concerning respondents' interaction with and evaluation of candidates for the House of Representatives. However, because of redistricting in the early 1990s, the congressional districts for the 1992 respondents could not be pre-identified. The survey instrument was, therefore, redesigned to some degree, cutting some of the House-related content for the 1992 survey. The 50-state survey design also allows for the comparison of respondents' perceptions and evaluation of senators who were up for re-election with those in the second or fourth years of their terms. Topics covered include respondent's recall and like/dislike of House and Senate candidates, issues discussed in the campaigns, contact with House and Senate candidates/incumbents, respondent's opinion of the proper roles for senators and representatives, a limited set of issue questions, liberal/conservative self-placement, party identification, media exposure, and demographic information. Contextual data presented include election returns for the Senate primary and general elections, voting indices for the years 1983-1992, information about the Senate campaign such as election outcome predictions, campaign pollster used, and spending patterns, and demographic, geographic, and economic data for the state. Also included are derived... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09580.xml
American National Election Study 1998 Pilot Study by Virginia Sapiro ( )
5 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The 1998 Pilot Study focused on examining and improving the methodology used for future studies in the American National Election Studies series. The study provided an opportunity to test new instrumentation, fine-tune measurement of core concepts, and try out some innovative survey methods. The 1998 Pilot Study, conducted September 8 through November 3, 1998, marked the first time a study was conducted during an election season. Three high-profile gubernatorial contests in California, Illinois, and Georgia were used as a basis for testing instrumentation that can only be analyzed in the context of an electoral campaign and for investigating how to improve the election study's capacity to illuminate the impact of campaigns. Among the concepts covered in the study are political interest, knowledge, ideology, efficacy, trust, mobilization, issue attitudes/awareness keyed to actual campaigns, campaign interest, participation in a campaign, media use, candidate awareness, partisanship, vote intention, certainty of vote, and social context and communication. Several additional measures were piloted, including what part of the day the respondent tended to watch television, new social context and communication variables, need for evaluation, group mobilization, public mood, a new affirmative action variable, perceived tone of the campaign, awareness of campaign issues, and whether the respondent owned stock.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02693
American National Election Study, 1990-1992 Full Panel Survey by Warren Miller ( )
4 editions published in 1994 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This collection includes respondents who were first interviewed following the November 1990 general election (see AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1990: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ICPSR VERSION] [ICPSR 9548]), and then reinterviewed in two subsequent surveys: AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1990-1991 PANEL STUDY OF THE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF WAR/1991 PILOT STUDY [ICPSR VERSION] (ICPSR 9673) and AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067). The purpose of this panel study is to trace the fortunes of the Bush presidency, from post-Gulf War height to November election defeat, and to provide insight into the origins of the Bill Clinton and Ross Perot coalitions. It also allows the panel analyst to do a traditional assessment of panel attrition which is not possible with any of the collections mentioned above. In 1990, respondents answered questions on topics such as presidential performance, the Persian Gulf War, values and individualism, and foreign relations. Post-election vote validation and election administration survey data are also included. In 1991, respondents were reinterviewed several months after hostilities in the Persian Gulf ended. The survey content consisted of a repeat of a subset of questions from the 1990 Post-Election Survey, and additional items especially relevant to the Gulf War. A number of contextual variables also are provided, including summary variables that combine the respondent... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06230
American National Election Study 1992-1993 Panel Study on Securing Electoral Success/1993 Pilot Study ( )
4 editions published between 1994 and 2000 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This data collection currently encompasses two waves. The first wave is the 1992 Post-Election Survey. In addition to the standard or core content items, respondents were asked their positions on social issues such as altruism, abortion, the death penalty, prayer in the schools, the rights of homosexuals, sexual harassment, women's rights, and feminist consciousness. Other substantive themes included racial and ethnic stereotypes, opinions on school integration and affirmative action, attitudes toward immigrants (particularly Hispanics and Asians), opinions on immigration policy and bilingual education, assessments of United States foreign policy goals, and United States involvement in the Persian Gulf War. The second wave of this panel, the 1993 Pilot Study, was in the field approximately one year after the first wave. It reexamined a number of items from the 1992 study to give as complete a picture as possible of how President Clinton was faring in the eyes of the coalition that had elected him. It also sought to explore in more detail the strength and depth of the Ross Perot phenomenon and, in particular, the reasons behind his continued support. Finally, this second wave of the panel continued the tradition of all pilot studies in seeking to carry out research and development work for the subsequent year's election study. In this regard, the Pilot Study explored the perceived interests of several groups (e.g., wealthy, poor, middle class, Blacks, whites) in areas such as na... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06264
American national election study, 1990 : post-election survey by Warren E Miller ( )
5 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in 3 languages and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. For this collection, two forms of the survey instrument were used, with about 75 percent of the content being the same on both forms. Survey questions included the now standard National Election Studies battery of questions, along with items on presidential performance and the Persian Gulf conflict. Additionally, Form A contained questions relating to values and individualism, while Form B had content relating to foreign relations. The file also contains post-election vote validation and election administration survey data. Information is provided concerning sampling data, disposition of the case, control record variables, and information about the interviewer for the 1,980 interviews, plus nonsample and noninterview cases. Each of these records is associated with one or more call records that provide information on the date, day of the week, time of the call and its disposition, and the nature of the contact for those calls that resulted in contact with someone in the sample household.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09548.xml
American National Election Study 1990-1991 Panel Study of the Political Consequences of War/1991 Pilot Study ( )
3 editions published between 1991 and 1999 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The panel portion of this collection focuses on the consequences of war, with the first wave consisting of the 1990 Post-Election Survey conducted prior to the outbreak of hostilities in the Persian Gulf. The respondents were reinterviewed several months after hostilities ended, and in this wave the survey content consisted of a repeat of a subset of questions from the Post-Election Survey, and additional items especially relevant to the Gulf War conflict. In addition, a full-fledged pilot study, designed to explore new areas of interest and develop new instrumentation, is embedded in this collection. Among the topics covered in the Pilot portion of the survey are ethnic politics, gender, Social Security, Medicaid/medical care for the elderly, social altruism, and political knowledge. A number of contextual variables also are provided, including summary variables that combine the respondent's recall of his or her senator's and representative's vote on the use of force with that congressperson's actual vote, and county-level 1980 Census data on race.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09673
American National Election Study 2000 Pilot Study by Virginia Sapiro ( )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This brief special-topic Pilot study focused on a single general topic, trust. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the honesty, respectfulness, courteousness, and general trustworthiness of the neighbors in their communities, their colleagues at work, and politicians. Questions included items on respondents' membership in community organizations and attendance at meetings, whether the respondents worked cooperatively with others on community issues, and whether they had ever contacted government officials regarding community concerns. Politicians were evaluated as to their respect for the citizenry and for their opponents, whether they made campaign promises that they did not intend to keep, and whether politicians would pay more attention to people like the respondent if elections were held more often. One section of the questionnaire asked respondents to gauge how participating in certain activities (attending religious services, following public affairs, voting) and having certain opinions (in favor of further integrating public schools, increasing Social Security spending, instituting term limits for Congress) would shape other people's impressions of them. Demographic variables include gender, race, employment status, and length of residency in the community.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02936
American National Election Study, 1998 Post-Election Survey by Virginia Sapiro ( )
4 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Substantive themes of the 1998 election study include, among others, knowledge and evaluation of the House candidates and placement of the candidates on various issue dimensions, interest in the political campaigns, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, media use, evaluation of the mass media, vote choice, partisanship, and evaluations of the political parties and the party system. Additional items focused on political participation, political mobilization, evaluations of the president and Congress, the ''Lewinsky affair,'' egalitarianism, moral traditionalism, political trust, political efficacy, ideology, cultural pluralism, and political knowledge. Respondents were also asked about their attitudes toward a wide range of issues, including social policy, race policy, military and foreign policy, immigration, foreign imports, prayer in schools, school vouchers, the environment, the death penalty, women's rights, abortion, and religion and politics, including new measures of explicitly political and religious orientations. Demographic items such as age, sex, nationality, marital status, employment status, occupation, and education were also included.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02684
American National Election Study, 2000 Pre- and Post-Election Survey ( )
2 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES) entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election reinterview. A freshly drawn cross- section of the electorate was taken to yield 1,807 cases. Because the study includes a carefully designed mode experiment, the data represent two presidential studies in 2000, side by side. The core study preserves the past commitment to probability area sampling and face-to-face interviewing: 1,000 respondents were interviewed prior to the election and 694 were reinterviewed face-to-face after the election. Supporting the core study, random-digit dial sampling and telephone interviewing were used: 803 respondents were interviewed by phone prior to the election and 862 respondents were interviewed by phone after the election. As such, the experiment examines the differences between the two modes and provides a preview of what shifting to telephone interviewing will mean for the NES time-series. The content of the 2000 election study reflects its dual purpose as a traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a mode study. Many of the substantive themes included in the 2000 questionnaires are a continuation of past topics. Interest in politics and the election was examined through questions regarding interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, and information about politics. Respondents' knowledge of candidates and the political parties was ascertained through que... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03131
American National Election Study 1995 Pilot Study ( )
3 editions published between 1995 and 1999 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A number of pilot studies have been conducted by the National Election Studies (NES) for the purpose of developing new instrumentation. The 1995 Pilot Study is part of this effort, which also includes studies conducted in 1979, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, and 1993. As in earlier pilot studies (except for 1979), the 1995 study respondents were a subset of the previous year's traditional time-series respondents. The study is a one-wave reinterview of a randomly selected subset of respondents with telephones from the fresh cross-section portion of the AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1994: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1992 AND 1993 DATA] (ICPSR 6507). The 1995 Pilot Study was conducted between August 3 and September 10, 1995. The content of the study reflects the NES commitment to improve measures of candidate evaluation, the impact of the campaign, values and predispositions, the comparative study of elections, and other responses to a stimulus letter calling for ideas for content sent to the user community on November 4, 1994. Specific topic areas in the study include: (1) an experiment using different measures of affective reactions to political figures, (2) a module of items being concurrently tested in many other nations as part of a comparative study of politics, (3) a set of 12 items asking respondents to make tradeoffs among programs, taxes, and the budget deficit, (4) a set of items designed to measure attitudes toward the environment and environmental policy, (5) a new measure of ''humanitarianism,'' and (6) an extensive set of items regarding attention to the media intended to capture exposure to the political campaigns. In order to include all of the content, and to test between competing instrumentation, there were two forms of the questionnaire. Rosters of items, such as the thermometer, were randomized in administration to minimize order effects.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06636
American National Election Study, 1990 Senate Election Study ( )
2 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This data collection, focusing on the 1990 Senate elections, is part of a planned three-part series (1988, 1990, 1992) of Senate studies. Over the course of the three elections, voters in each of the 50 states will be interviewed, and data will be gathered on citizen evaluations of all senators at each stage of their six-year election cycles. In this collection, as in the 1988 Senate Study, contextual data for all 50 states have been merged with the survey data. The survey data facilitate the comparison of House of Representatives and Senate races through the use of questions that generally parallel those questions used in election studies since 1978 concerning respondents' interaction with and evaluation of candidates for the House of Representatives. The 50-state survey design also allows for the comparison of respondents' perceptions and evaluations of senators who are up for re-election with those in the second or fourth years of their terms. Topics covered include respondent's recall and like/dislike of House and Senate candidates, issues discussed in the campaigns, contact with House and Senate candidates/incumbents, respondent's opinion of the proper roles for senators and representatives, a limited set of issue questions, liberal/conservative self-placement, party identification, media exposure, and demographic information. Contextual data presented include election returns for the Senate primary and general elections, voting indices for the years 1983-1990, information about the Senate campaign such as election outcome predictions, campaign pollster used, spending patterns, and demographic, geographic, and economic data for the state. Derived measures also are included that reorganize the House of Representatives and Senate variables by party of candidate and incumbency/challenger status of candidate, and, for Senate variables only,... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09549
American National Election Study 1997 Pilot Study ( )
2 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The 1997 Pilot Study is part of the National Election Studies (NES) effort to develop new instrumentation. Previous pilot studies were conducted in 1979, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, and 1995. As in earlier pilot studies (except for 1979), the 1997 study respondents were a subset of the previous year's traditional time-series respondents. This study is a one-wave reinterview of a randomly-selected subset of respondents with telephones from the fresh cross-section portion of the AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1996: POST-ELECTION SURVEY (ICPSR 6896). The 1997 Pilot Study was conducted between September 5 and October 1, 1997. Specific topic areas in the study include: (1) a battery designed to improve NES instrumentation on nonelectoral political participation and mobilization, (2) testing of NES instrumentation on group closeness, group difference, and group conflict as a basis of current mass politics, and group threat as a basis of group-based politics, (3) evaluations of the president, Congress, and the Supreme Court using a new battery of items, and (4) the role of religion in citizens' political thinking. The use of Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) enabled a number of experimental treatments within the survey instrumentation, including random assignment, early-late placement, and presentation order. In addition, rosters of items, such as the thermometer, were randomized in administration to minimize order effects.... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02282
American National Election Studies, 1992-1997 Combined File ( )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The 1992-1997 Combined File brings together all publicly released variables from the following National Election Study datasets: the 1992 Pre- and Post-Election Survey (ICPSR 6067) (only the 1,005 ''fresh'' cross-section cases), the 1993 Pilot Study (ICPSR 6264), the 1994 Post-Election Survey (ICPSR 6507), the 1995 Pilot Study (ICSPR 6636), the 1996 Pre- and Post-Election Survey (ICPSR 6896), and the 1997 Pilot Study (ICPSR 2282). The data in this combined file are identical to the original datasets in terms of sampling, case disposition, and conditions for interviewing. All survey variables are included along with other ancillary variables, such as those that describe the randomization position. This data file can be used for both cross-sectional and panel analysis through selecting subsets of cases. Each election year can be analyzed as a whole, in cross-sectional or trend analysis
 
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