WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:15:47 2014 UTClccn-n800405840.39The scroll and the marble studies in reading and reception in Hellenistic poetry /0.640.92Hymni et epigrammata qvartvm edidit Vdalricvs de Wilamowitz-Moellendorff99454635Callimachusn 80040584422650Alexandria, Kallimachos <<von>> ca. v300-v240Alexandrinus, Callimachus ca. v300-v240Cal·límacCalímacoCalímaco, 305-240 v. Chr.Calímaco, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.CalimacusCall.Callimachos Schriftsteller ca. v300-v240CallimachusCallimachus 0305?-0240? av. J.-C.Callimachus Alexandrinus ca. v300-v240Callimachus, ap 310-ap 240 p.m.ē.Callimachus, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Callimachus, Cyrenaeus, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Callimachus Cyrenaeus ca. v300-v240Callimachus Cyrenaicus, c. 305-240 a.C.Callimachus, Cyrenaicus, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Callimachus Cyrenensis.Callimachus Cyrenensis ca. v300-v240Callimachus EpicusCallimachus Epicus ca. v300-v240Callimachus Philologus ca. v300-v240Callimachus Poeta ca. v300-v240Callimachus von Cyrene ca. v300-v240Callimaco.Callimaco 0305?-0240? av. J.-C.Callimaco, 305-240 v. Chr.Callimaco, c. 305-240 a.C.Callimaco, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Callimaco ca. v300-v240Callimaco di Cirene ca. v300-v240CallimakhCallimaque.Callimaque (0305?-0240? av. J.-C.).Callimaque, 305-240 v. Chr.Callimaque, ca 310-ca 240 př. Kr.Callimaque ca. v300-v240Callimaque de Cyrène ca. v300-v240Cirene, Callimaco <<di>> ca. v300-v240Cyrenaeus, Callimachus ca. v300-v240Cyrene, Callimachus <<von>> ca. v300-v240Cyréne, Callimaque <<de>> ca. v300-v240Cyrenensis, Callimachus ca. v300-v240De Cyréne, Callimaque ca. v300-v240DeCyréne, Callimaque ca. v300-v240Di Cirene, Callimaco ca. v300-v240DiCirene, Callimaco ca. v300-v240Epicus, Callimachus ca. v300-v240KalimahKalimah CirenjaninKalimah iz KireneKālīmākhūs al-QūrīnīKallimachKallimach, ap 310-ap 240 p.m.ē.Kallimach, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Kallimach z Cyreny.Kallimachos.Kallímachos 0305?-0240? av. J.-C.Kallimachos, 305-240 v. Chr.Kallimachos Alexandrinischer Dichter ca. v300-v240Kallimachos, c. 305-240 a.C.Kallimachos ca. v300-v240Kallimachos Kyrēnaios ca. v300-v240Kallimachos Schriftsteller ca. v300-v240Kallimachos Sohn des Battos ca. v300-v240Kallimachos von Alexandria ca. v300-v240Kallimachos von KyreneKallimachos von Kyrene ca. v300-v240Kallimachos z Kyrény, ca 310-ca 240 př. Kr.KallimachusKallimachus, 305-240 v. Chr.Kallimachus ca. v300-v240KallimahosKallimahos KurênaiosKallimakhKallimakh, ca 305-ca 240 f.Kr.Kyrenaios, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240Kyrene, Kallimachos <<von>> ca. v300-v240Philologus, Callimachus ca. v300-v240Poeta, Callimachus ca. v300-v240Qūrīnī, KālīmākhūsSohn des Battos, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240Von Alexandria, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240Von Kyrene, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240VonAlexandria, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240VonCyrene, Callimachus ca. v300-v240VonKyrene, Kallimachos ca. v300-v240ΚαλλίμαχοςΚαλλίμαχος 0305?-0240? av. J.-C.Καλλίμαχος ο Κυρηναίος (π. 300-π. 240)קאלימאכוסكاليماخوسカリマコス卡利马科斯lccn-nr93029942Mair, A. W.(Alexander William)1875-1928trledtlccn-no95052271Mair, G. R.(Gilbert Robinson)1877-trllccn-nr88012547Bing, Peterlccn-n50033430Theocritusothlccn-n80094452Trypanis, C. A.(Constantine Athanasius)1909-auitrledtfast-814330Argonauts (Greek mythology) in literaturelccn-n79041738Ovid43 B.C.-17 A.D. or 18 A.D.lccn-n82070172Blum, Rudolf1909-lccn-nr97044893Posidippusof Pellaapproximately 310 B.C.-lccn-n2004036068Tress, Heather van1966-CallimachusPoetryCriticism, interpretation, etcHistoryCallimachusEgypt--AlexandriaGreek poetry, HellenisticInfluence (Literary, artistic, etc.)Epigrams, GreekRome (Empire)Art appreciationIntellectual lifeLiteraturePosidippus,--of Pella,Metamorphosis in literatureIntertextualityFables, LatinMythology, Classical, in literatureRhetoric, AncientAllusions in literatureOvid,TechniqueMetamorphoses (Ovid)GreeceBibliographyBibliography--MethodologyCatalogingLibrariesGreek literature--Bibliography--MethodologyAlexandrian LibraryLibrary scienceArgonauts (Greek mythology) in literatureArgonautica (Apollonius, Rhodius)Epic poetry, GreekTheocritusGreek poetryMedea (Greek mythology) in literatureJason (Greek mythology) in literatureTheseus (Greek mythology)Hymns, Greek (Classical)Aliksāndrīnā (Library)Hero (Greek mythology)Leander (Greek mythology)Aesthetics, AncientIambic poetry, GreekDemeter (Greek deity)Cassandra (Legendary character)Greek poetry, Hellenistic--AppreciationAthena (Greek deity)Hymns, Greek (Classical)--Translations into EnglishRealism in literatureReader-response criticismAuthors and readersInspiration in literature14891496149715091513151915321533154015491550155115531555156115631564156615721574157715791584158715891591159716061612165916751678168716911692169716991700172517281733173517371741174217441748174917511755175617571761176317641766176917701772177317741775177617771779178217841787178817921793179417951797179817991801180318051807180818111812181518161817181818191820182118231824182518261827182918311833183418351836184018411842184318451847185018511852185318551856185718591860186118621863186418651866186718701871187318761877187918801882188418851886188718881889189118921893189518961897189919011902190519071909191019111913191419151916191719201921192219231924192519261928192919301931193219331934193519371938194019411943194519461948194919501953195419551956195719581959196019611962196319641965196619671968196919701971197219731974197519761977197819791980198119821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220042005200620072008200920102011201220132366410842546881.01PA3945ocn185670412ocn763021303ocn460363399ocn797054229ocn459039180ocn310898697ocn80029790666184ocn000688804book18890.56CallimachusHymns and epigramsEnthält: Hymns and epigrams / Callimachus. <Alexandra> / Lycophron. <The phaenomena> / Aratus+-+089644921548243ocn002905104book16060.76CallimachusCallimachusCriticism, interpretation, etc+-+016696346547186ocn642439761book17410.76CallimachusCallimachi hymni et epigrammata quibus accesserunt Theognidis carmina: nec non epigrammata centum septuaginta sex ex anthologia Græca, Quorum magna pars non ante separatim excusa est. His adjuncta est Galeni suasoria ad artes. Notas addidit, atque omnia emendate imprimenda curavit editor. In Praefatione disseritur de Linguae Graecae Pronunciatione ; secundumne Quantitatem an Accentum melius procedat42514ocn004139528book19210.59CallimachusCallimachus and LycophronPoetry42120ocn019971817book19900.84CallimachusCallimachus : HecalePoetryAdrian Hollis's second edition of Callimachus' Hecale includes an English translation of the original Greek text. Twenty years after the first edition appeared in 1990, close study of the Byzantine poets, scholars, and clerics who knew Callimachus' poem intimately has allowed significant progress in our understanding of the poem. Equally valuable are two Byzantine lexicons which clearly had access to an ancient commentary on the Hecale; an Attic vase, which provides our first artistic representation of the myth; and an inscribed Greek elegy from Kandahar, which suggests that Callimachus' 'miniature epic' was known to a Greek poet working in that remote bastion of Hellenism - additional proof of the poet's importance within Hellenistic culture+-+119710446539814ocn010430633book19840.79CallimachusHymn to DemeterPoetry+-+024017670535213ocn011470316book19840.79CallimachusThe fifth hymnPoetryCallimachus was one of the most important and influential writers in the ancient world. He was the outstanding poet of the Hellenistic period and had a profound effect on the subsequent course of Greek and Roman literature. The hymns are intricate, allusive and difficult poetry, and need elucidation for the modern reader. 'The Fifth Hymn: The Bath of Pallas', is considered by many to be Callimachus' finest surviving poem. Anthony Bulloch has established a new text of the poem, which is printed here with facing English translation. The substantial introduction and full commentary aim to introduce the poem to a wide audience and to help the modern reader to reconstruct what the ancient reader may have taken for granted as part of the crucial and intellectual background and to achieve an informed and sensitive appreciation of the poem in its full perspective. This will be welcomed by Greek scholars and those interested in Greek and Roman poetry+-+704917670527010ocn000244891book19550.53CallimachusCallimachus: Hymns and Epigrams. Lycophron+-+089644921525335ocn006833186book19580.56CallimachusAetia, Iambi, lyric poems, Hecale, minor epic and elegiac poems, and other fragmentsPoetryWe have no explicit information about the poet MUSAEUS, author of the short epic poem on Hero and Leander, except that he is given in some manuscripts, the title Grammatikos, a teacher, learned in the rhetoric, poetry and philosophy of his time. He was obviously a follower of the Egyptian poet Nonnus of Panopolis, of the fifth century A.D., and his poem seems also to presuppose the Paraphrase of the Psalms of Pseudo-Apollinarius which can be dated to the period 460-470. He may well be identical with the addressee of two letters by Procopius of Gaza (c. 465-528). Among the authors of that period of Egyptians Colluthus and Christodorus of Coptus quote him, and he seems to rank as an already recognized authority in the circle of scholars, poets and orators of the time of Anastasius I (491-518). He takes up a subject whose first detailed treatment is preserved in Ovids Heroides (Epistles 18 and 19), but he presents it in a quite different manner. Among the literary antecedents to which this learned Grammatikos expressly alludes, the most prominent are Books 5 and 6 of the Odyssey and Platos Phaedrus. Besides his knowledge of the Hymns of Proclus he quotes not only the Metaphrasis of the Gospel of St. John by Nonnus, but also a poem by St. Gregory Nazianzenus and even the New Testatment. So he was probably a Christian Neoplatonist writing a Christian allegory. This publication completes the cycle of late Greek epics in the tradition of Nonnus+-+481944921519420ocn025442476book18560.70HesiodThe works of Hesiod, Callimachus, and TheognisCriticism, interpretation, etc19330ocn495924318book19400.81CallimachusLes origines Réponse aux Telchines ; Elégies ; Epigrammes ; Iambes et pièces lyriques ; Hécalé ; HymnesEnth.: Les origines ; Réponse aux Telchines ; Elégies ; Epigrammes ; Iambes et pièces lyriques ; Hécalé ; Hymnes17422ocn004708354book19110.76CallimachusCallimachi fragmenta nuper reperta16322ocn008838748book19220.84CallimachusCallimaque ...13322ocn000371868book19570.59CallimachusAetia, Iambi, lyric poems, Hecale, minor epic and elegiac poems, fragments of epigrams, fragments of uncertain location+-+481944921512621ocn003386996book16970.86CallimachusCallimachi Hymni, epigrammata et fragmentaPoetry12420ocn010805520book19220.66CallimachusHymnes. Épigrammes. Les origines. Hécalé. Iambes. Poèmes lyriques1249ocn716552440book19580.90CallimachusAetiaEnthält: Aetia ; Iambi ; Lyric poems ; Hecale ; Minor epic and elegiac poems, and other fragments / Callimachus. Hero and Leander / Musaeus+-+565630446511112ocn006088230book19680.84CallimachusCallimachi Hymnus in Dianam. Introduzione, testo critico e commentoPoetry1027ocn036457601book19960.88CallimachusAitia, libri primo e secondoCriticism, interpretation, etc10024ocn014766996book18610.92CallimachusHymni et epigrammata qvartvm edidit Vdalricvs de Wilamowitz-Moellendorff11264ocn651663573file20090.39Bing, PeterThe scroll and the marble studies in reading and reception in Hellenistic poetryCriticism, interpretation, etcWhile people of previous ages relied on public performance as their chief means of experiencing poetry, the Hellenistic age developed what one may term a culture of reading. This was the first era in which poets consciously shaped their works with an eye toward publication and reception not just on the civic stage but in several media--in performance, on inscribed monuments, in scrolls. The essays in Peter Bing's collection explore how poetry accommodated various audiences and how these audiences in turn experienced the text in diverse ways. Over the years, Bing's essays have focused on certain Hellenistic authors and genres--particularly on Callimachus and Posidippus and on epigram. His themes, too, have been broadly consistent. Thus, although the essays in The Scroll and the Marble span some twenty years, they offer a coherent vision of Hellenistic poetics as a whole+-+578166729510593ocn235951600file20040.50Tress, Heather vanPoetic memory allusion in the poetry of Callimachus and the Metamorphoses of OvidCriticism, interpretation, etcThis study of Callimachus' and Ovid's allusive practice offers a unique view of the application of one theory of allusion (based upon that of Conte, but subsequently expanded upon) to a Greek and Latin poet+-+K20696955410463ocn706078541file19910.53Blum, RudolfKallimachos the Alexandrian Library and the origins of bibliographyHistory<DIV> The famous library of Alexandria, founded around 295 BCE by Ptolemaios I, housed the greatest collection of texts in the ancient world and was a fertile site of Hellenistic scholarship. Rudolf Blum & rsquo;s landmark study, originally published in German in 1977, argues that Kallimachos of Kyrene was not only the second director of the Alexandrian library but also the inventor of two essential scholarly tools still in use to this day: the library catalog and the & ldquo;biobibliographical & rdquo; reference work. Kallimachos expanded the library & rsquo;s inventory lists into volumes called the Pinakes , which extensively described and categorized each work and became in effect a Greek national bibliography and the source and paradigm for most later bibliographic lists of Greek literature. Though the Pinakes have not survived, Blum attempts a detailed reconstruction of Kallimachos & rsquo;s inventories and catalogs based on a careful analysis of surviving sources, which are presented here in full translation. </DIV>+-+79268644757556ocn017200167book19880.59Hutchinson, G. OHellenistic poetryCriticism, interpretation, etcThis broad study of the Hellenistic poets of the 3rd century B.C. provides a much needed picture of the poetry of the period while demonstrating its quality and vitality. Hutchinson explores the work of such writers as Theocritus, Callimachus, and Apollonius of Rhodes--developing a general conception of poetry that centers around the poets' handling of tone, level, and form--and offers a fresh analysis of the influence of Hellenistic poetry on that of Rome--From publisher's description+-+53929634653246574ocn000312073book19580.59CallimachusAetia, Iambi, lyric poems, Hecale, minor epic and elegiac poems, fragments of epigrams, fragments of uncertain location5714ocn016224272book19880.39CallimachusCallimachus : hymns, epigrams, select fragments+-+56378365355332ocn002035345book19750.56CallimachusAetia, Iambi, lyric poems, Hecale, minor epic and elegiac poems, and other fragmentsPoetryWe have no explicit information about the poet MUSAEUS, author of the short epic poem on Hero and Leander, except that he is given in some manuscripts, the title Grammatikos, a teacher, learned in the rhetoric, poetry and philosophy of his time. He was obviously a follower of the Egyptian poet Nonnus of Panopolis, of the fifth century A.D., and his poem seems also to presuppose the Paraphrase of the Psalms of Pseudo-Apollinarius which can be dated to the period 460-470. He may well be identical with the addressee of two letters by Procopius of Gaza (c. 465-528). Among the authors of that period of Egyptians Colluthus and Christodorus of Coptus quote him, and he seems to rank as an already recognized authority in the circle of scholars, poets and orators of the time of Anastasius I (491-518). He takes up a subject whose first detailed treatment is preserved in Ovids Heroides (Epistles 18 and 19), but he presents it in a quite different manner. Among the literary antecedents to which this learned Grammatikos expressly alludes, the most prominent are Books 5 and 6 of the Odyssey and Platos Phaedrus. Besides his knowledge of the Hymns of Proclus he quotes not only the Metaphrasis of the Gospel of St. John by Nonnus, but also a poem by St. Gregory Nazianzenus and even the New Testatment. So he was probably a Christian Neoplatonist writing a Christian allegory. This publication completes the cycle of late Greek epics in the tradition of Nonnus+-+48194492154913ocn031970182book19950.66Cameron, AlanCallimachus and his criticsHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcAnother axiom of modern scholarship is that the object of Callimachus's literary polemic was epic. Yet Cameron shows that the thriving school of epic poets celebrating the wars of Hellenistic kings that has so dominated modern study simply never existed. Elegy was the fashionable genre of the age, and the bone of contention between Callimachus and his rivals (all fellow elegists) was the nature of elegiac narrative. A final chapter sketches some of the implications of this revised view of Callimachus and his world for the interpretation of Roman, especially Augustan, poetry+-+62189564154432ocn006379448book19800.63Ferguson, JohnCallimachusCriticism, interpretation, etc3565ocn070676548book20060.79Hunter, R. LThe shadow of Callimachus : studies in the reception of Hellenistic poetry at RomeIndividual studies concern the poets' declared attitudes to their own work, the figure of Dionysus/Bacchus and the poetry of world conquest, the creation of similes, and the conversion of Greek bucolic into Latin pastoral."--BOOK JACKET+-+14264167053093ocn045463454book20000.79CallimachusThe poems of CallimachusCriticism, interpretation, etcPoetry"This important new verse translation of the extant works and major fragments of Callimachus includes a full Introduction, covering the poet's life and times, the range of his achievements, and the difficulties in the way of appreciation. It does not offer, as other translations do, a mere selection of fragments but presents them as integral parts of the poetry books in which they originally figured, as these can be reconstructed in the light of modern research. Each fragment is introduced in relation to what precedes and follows it, enabling students and general readers, for the first time ever, to assess what Callimachus was like in his most important productions+-+55129634652743ocn014270984book19860.79Zanker, GRealism in Alexandrian poetry : a literature and its audienceHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etc2487ocn711047824book20110.86Acosta-Hughes, BenjaminCallimachus in context : from Plato to the Augustan poetsCriticism, interpretation, etc"Scholarly reception has bequeathed two Callimachuses: the Roman version is a poet of elegant non-heroic poetry (usually erotic elegy), represented by a handful of intertexts with a recurring set of images - slender Muse, instructing divinity, small voice, pure waters; the Greek version emphasizes a learned scholar who includes literary criticism within his poetry, an encomiast of the Ptolemies, a poet of the book whose narratives are often understood as metapoetic. This study does not dismiss these Callimachuses, but situates them within a series of interlocking historical and intellectual contexts in order better to understand how they arose. In this narrative of his poetics and poetic reception four main sources of creative opportunism are identified: Callimachus' reactions to philosophers and literary critics as arbiters of poetic authority, the potential of the text as a venue for performance, awareness of Alexandria as a new place, and finally, his attraction for Roman poets"--+-+62035525663242385ocn018820989book19880.88Bing, PeterThe well-read muse : present and past in Callimachus and the Hellenistic poetsHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etc"In this study, the author investigates the era in which the written work - the book - superseded the assumption of oral composition and performance. In this and other respects, as this study demonstrates, Hellenistic poets saw themselves as now being part of a new world, remote from the great genres and achievements of the earlier literary tradition. That sense of distance from the past gave authors freedom to experiment. At the same time, it incited them to view their poetic heritage as something deserving intense scholarly study. The author examines one fundamental result of this attitude, the Hellenistic tendency toward learned allusion, and what this meant to a period pursuing a different literary approach."--BOOK JACKET+-+15862442452251ocn031132536book19940.81DeForest, Mary MargoliesApollonius' Argonautica : a Callimachean epicCriticism, interpretation, etc+-+72655695542023ocn002930525book19760.86Cody, John VHorace and Callimachean aesthetics1837ocn005778246book19490.81Puelma, MarioLucilius und Kallimachos; zur Geschichte einer Gattung der hellenistisch-römischen PoesieCriticism, interpretation, etc1837ocn003079358book19600.81Wimmel, WalterKallimachos in Rom; die Nachfolge seines apologetischen Dichtens in der AugusteerzeitCriticism, interpretation, etc1603ocn005460902book19690.56CallimachusHymns and epigramsEnthält: Hymns and epigrams / Callimachus. <Alexandra> / Lycophron. <The phaenomena> / Aratus+-+08964492151542ocn038064343book19970.86Asper, MarkusOnomata allotria : zur Genese, Struktur und Funktion poetologischer Metaphern bei KallimachosCriticism, interpretation, etc+-+0240176705+-+0240176705Fri Mar 21 15:17:25 EDT 2014batch75302