WorldCat Identities

Clawson, Dan

Overview
Works: 26 works in 115 publications in 2 languages and 12,245 library holdings
Genres: Book reviews  Reviews  History  Case studies  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: JK467, 322.30973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Dan Clawson
Required reading : sociology's most influential books by Dan Clawson( )

10 editions published in 1998 in English and Undetermined and held by 2,647 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Identifies and discusses the seventeen most influential books in the field of sociology
Public sociology : fifteen eminent sociologists debate politics and the profession in the twenty-first century by Dan Clawson( )

14 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2,234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2004, Michael Burawoy, speaking as president of the American Sociological Association, generated far-reaching controversy when he issued an ambitious and impassioned call for a "public sociology." Burawoy argued that sociology should speak beyond the university, engaging with social movements and deepening an understanding of the historical and social context in which they exist. In this volume, renowned sociologists come together to debate the perils and the potentials of Burawoy's challenge
Families at work : expanding the boundaries by Naomi Gerstel( )

11 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,774 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is the relationship between work and family in a world where employment creates endless tensions for families and families create endless tensions for the workplace?
Unequal time : gender, class, and family in employment schedules by Dan Clawson( )

6 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Unequal Time investigates the connected schedules of four health sector occupations: professional doctors and nurses, and working-class EMTs and nursing assistants. While the work-family literature mostly examines the hours people work, Clawson and Gerstel delve into the process through which schedules are set, negotiated, and contested. They show how workers in all four occupations experience the effects of schedule uncertainty but do so in distinct ways, largely shaped by the intersection of gender and class. Doctors, who are largely male and professional, have significant control over their schedules, though they often claim otherwise, and tend to work long hours because they earn respect from their peers for doing so. By contrast, nursing assistants, primarily female and working-class, work demanding hours because they face penalties for taking time off, no matter how valid the reasons. Without institutional support, they often turn to coworkers to help create more orderly lives."--Publisher's Web site
Dollars and votes : how business campaign contributions subvert democracy by Dan Clawson( )

8 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,149 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Money talks : corporate PACS and political influence by Dan Clawson( Book )

6 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 870 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Here is a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at what PACs want from Congress and how they go about getting it. Everyone agrees that in politics "money talks" and that political action committees (PACs) have transformed our system of campaign finance. But what exactly do the PACs hope to get in return for the money they contribute to the campaign chests of politicians? Although much has been written about how such money corrupts Congress and shapes public policy, this remarkable book is the first to ask the men and women who actually spend the money, the PAC managers themselves, exactly how they work - how they decide whom to support and with how much. Based on extensive and extremely candid interviews with key officials from every major kind of corporate PAC, the book shows that the impact of PACs is more subtle - and more insidious - than merely changing votes. Money Talks shows how PACs work - out of the public eye - to make minor changes in the wording of a bill, long before it reaches the floor of Congress. If a company can get the wording it wants, according to one PAC director, then "it doesn't much matter how people vote afterwards." PAC directors are not worried by reform proposals, the book shows. The PAC is only one of many ways they can influence Congress, "a tool and nothing more." If PACs were abolished, they are confident they could find ways to evade the rules. The authors argue that multiplying regulations won't work and that PACs will always stay one step ahead of any regulations. As one PAC director said, "by the time they change it, it's too late," and the book cites several PAC managers who explain how they would get around the system. Money Talks argues instead for an innovative system of public financing, one which would cost us far less than the tax loopholes and giveaways that are the products of our current system
Labor in the time of Trump by Jasmine Kerrissey( )

4 editions published between 2019 and 2020 in English and held by 790 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The labor movement has been under attack for decades; by understanding the nature of the right-wing attack, activists and scholars can analyze ways to build a working-class movement in the United States"--
The next upsurge : labor and the new social movements by Dan Clawson( Book )

11 editions published between 2003 and 2018 in English and Undetermined and held by 713 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. labor movement may be on the verge of massive growth, according to Dan Clawson. He argues that unions don't grow slowly and incrementally, but rather in bursts. Even if the AFL-CIO could organize twice as many members per year as it now does, it would take thirty years to return to the levels of union membership that existed when Ronald Reagan was elected president. In contrast, labor membership more than quadrupled in the years from 1934 to 1945. For there to be a new upsurge, Clawson asserts, labor must fuse with social movements concerned with race, gender, and global justice. The new forms may create a labor movement that breaks down the boundaries between "union" and "community" or between work and family issues. Clawson finds that this is already happening in some parts of the labor movement: labor has endorsed global justice and opposed war in Iraq, student activists combat sweatshops, unions struggle for immigrant rights. Innovative campaigns of this sort, Clawson shows, create new strategies--determined by workers rather than union organizers-that redefine the very meaning of the labor movement. "The Next Upsurge presents a range of examples from attempts to replace "macho" unions with more feminist models to campaigns linking labor and community issues and attempts to establish cross-border solidarity and a living wage
Bureaucracy and the labor process : the transformation of U.S. industry, 1860-1920 by Dan Clawson( Book )

12 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 558 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The future of higher education by Dan Clawson( Book )

7 editions published between 2010 and 2015 in English and held by 133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public sociology : ideas, arguments, and visions for the future( )

8 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2004, Michael Burawoy, speaking as president of the American Sociological Association, generated far-reaching controversy when he issued an ambitious and impassioned call for a ""public sociology."" Burawoy argued that sociology should speak beyond the university, engaging with social movements and deepening an understanding of the historical and social context in which they exist. In this volume, renowned sociologists come together to debate the perils and the potentials of Burawoy's challenge. Contributors: Andrew Abbott, Michael Burawoy, Patricia Hill Collins, Barbara Ehrenreich, Evelyn
Studying gender and class : a multiple methods approach to analyzing time by Naomi Gerstel( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This case study examined the social processes shaping people's hours and schedules and the ways these produce inequality in the time spent at work and at home. Using multiple methods, we compare four occupationsdoctors (predominantly male professionals), nurses (mostly female professionals), emergency medical technicians (mostly men, working class), and certified nursing assistants (mostly women, low-wage workers). We used four different methods to study these groups: a mail survey with closed-ended questions, face-to-face open-ended intensive interviews with many probes, participant observation at multiple medical sites, and various documents from these sites. The four occupations not only vary by class and gender, but the doctors, nurses, emergency medical technicians, and certified nursing assistants work in the same organizations and interact with each other. This made it possible to get their multiple and distinctive perspectives on job hours and the ways these differentially shaped, and were shaped by, their work and families. In many projects, researchers address the obstacles and limits, what could not be done. In this case, the opposite is true: We consistently did more than we had projected, for interviews, observations, and documents. That made the project richer, but also meant it took longer than we had originally expected
Labor in the Time of Trump( )

2 editions published between 2019 and 2020 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Labor in the Time of Trump critically analyzes the right-wing attack on workers and unions and offers strategies to build a working-class movement.While President Trump's election in 2016 may have been a wakeup call for labor and the Left, the underlying processes behind this shift to the right have been building for at least forty years. The contributors show that only by analyzing the vulnerabilities in the right-wing strategy can the labor movement develop an effective response.Essays in the volume examine the conservative upsurge, explore key challenges the labor movement faces today, and draw lessons from recent activist successes
Kagakuteki kanri seiseishi( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Work and families( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pakistani pro-democracy movement : from the 1960s to the 2000s by Sofia Checa( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

in Pakistan from the 1960s to the 2000s, with a focus on the latter. The dissertation is composed of three different papers. The first paper is an analysis of the changing civil society in Pakistan. I argue that in order to understand why the two movements were so different, we need to look at not just a snap shot of the civil society, but its evolution over the years. Rather than thinking of civil society as a static collection of different groups and organizations, this research analyzes it as a combination of groups (or structures) as well as processes that changed over time. The second paper is a study of the stark urban-rural and class divides that exist in the country, which I argue, lead to people having different opinions about voting, politicians, and electoral politics in general. A big part of this story is the alignment of the Pakistani military's business interests with certain sections of the society. Both these factors - the changing civil society as well as the urban-rural and class divides - have implications for who viii participates in the movement and the demands being made. The final paper examines the diversity within the prodemocracy movement of the 2000s, which makes it rather unique compared to other movements analyzed in the social movement literature. I analyze diversity within the movement in terms of the wide array of ideological leanings of movement participants as well as the different kinds of coalitional models that co-existed within the movement: loose coalitions, pragmatic coalitions, Frenemies, and opposing movements. The research is based on interviews conducted with activists who were involved in either or both movements as well as an analysis of blogs, newspaper articles and other secondary sources
Social reproduction in the New England community college system : a critical cultural studies perspective by Sarah Marmon( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Statistical data on community colleges confirms how vast the community college institution is: Serving 46% of all undergraduates in the country, or 12.4 million students. A large body of literature exists on the specifics of social reproduction in four-year universities; as well as the specifics of social reproduction in racially and economically segregated high schools. However, there exists a blind spot in this literature when it comes to social reproduction at the community college. Through conducting interviews with students, faculty and staff at three local community colleges, this ethnographic study explores this theoretical and empirical blind spot by using a critical cultural studies perspective on social reproduction, asking questions around community college students' experiences on three levels: students themselves, the institutional level through administration and governance; and, lastly, the communication strategy of the community college. Community colleges largely serve working class students, immigrants and older learners. They are the embodiment of the classic American dream that social mobility is possible through a democratic and public education system that allows anyone to 'work their way up.' On the other hand, they can work to funnel students too quickly into vocational tracks that foreclose the possibility of a higher-prestige, and higher-earning, bachelor's degree. Community colleges straddle this tension between upward social mobility and class reproduction, as well as institutional tensions produced by needing to adapt to pervasive neoliberal logic. Student interviews highlight the ways their educational experiences are shaped by these tensions, given the community college's unique structural education within higher education, and how these tensions can work to foreclose or open their future education possibilities. This thesis also explores the following themes: the community college's positioning relative to public state schools and elite private schools; community college governance; workforce changes among faculty and staff and it's effect on students; political implications of the community college education model; and, more broadly, understanding the place of public education in a wider neoliberal sociopolitical context
The Time Crunch( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Embattled education : charter school expansion and teachers' union resistance in Massachusetts by Kyla Walters( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The 2016 Massachusetts ballot included a referendum - Question 2 - proposing to eliminate the state's current "cap" on the number of charter schools permitted. Question 2 was the first ballot referendum in the country about charter school expansion. Backers of the ballot measure saw this as an important "test case" to champion school choice. Ten months before the election, the pro-expansion side boasted many advantages, including $18 million, endorsements from the governor and the two largest newspapers in the state, and a 25-point lead in the polls. Yet, despite getting outspent by nearly $11 million in what became the most expensive ballot referendum in Massachusetts history, the opposition secured a decisive victory. My study asks what shaped this unexpected outcome. I argue two factors were decisive. First, the No on 2 side engaged teachers' union members - namely classroom educators - to become what I call everyday spokespeople, while the Yes on 2 campaign relied on advertising and paid canvassers. Second, although the mostly White teachers and their unions were vulnerable to criticisms framing their stance as racist and self-interested, they were able to build an interracial coalition, what I call a racial resource, that neutralized the "civil rights issue of our time" argument that pro-charter expansion advocates wanted to feature. I argue that No on 2 was able to develop and deploy more authentic and trusted racial resources in a more ideologically coherent way than the Yes on 2 campaign, which opted for an interracial advertising strategy funded by White elites
Be creative the subliminal way by Dan Clawson( Recording )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Required reading : sociology's most influential books
Covers
Public sociology : fifteen eminent sociologists debate politics and the profession in the twenty-first centuryFamilies at work : expanding the boundariesDollars and votes : how business campaign contributions subvert democracyThe next upsurge : labor and the new social movementsBureaucracy and the labor process : the transformation of U.S. industry, 1860-1920The future of higher educationPublic sociology : ideas, arguments, and visions for the future
Alternative Names
Dan Clawson American sociologist

Dan Clawson Amerikaans socioloog (1948-2019)

Dan Clawson socheolaí Meiriceánach

Dan Clawson US-amerikanischer Soziologe

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Languages
English (105)

Japanese (2)