WorldCat Identities

Hamermesh, Daniel S.

Overview
Works: 249 works in 1,305 publications in 2 languages and 13,672 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: HF5386, 650.1
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Daniel S Hamermesh
 
Most widely held works by Daniel S Hamermesh
Beauty pays : why attractive people are more successful by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

16 editions published between 2010 and 2013 in English and Chinese and held by 967 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Most of us know there is a payoff to looking good, and in the quest for beauty we spend countless hours and billions of dollars on personal grooming, cosmetics, and plastic surgery. But how much better off are the better looking? Based on the evidence, quite a lot. The first book to seriously measure the advantages of beauty, Beauty Pays demonstrates how society favors the beautiful and how better-looking people experience startling but undeniable benefits in all aspects of life. Noted economist Daniel Hamermesh shows that the attractive are more likely to be employed, work more productively a
The economics of work and pay by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

40 editions published between 1966 and 1998 in English and held by 805 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Providing a grounding in the concepts of labour markets, this work features extensive coverage of worker-employer relationships, offering some long-range findings with distinct applications for the future, and an increased focus on the international labour
Jobless pay and the economy by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

11 editions published between 1977 and 1988 in English and held by 663 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Labor demand by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

18 editions published between 1993 and 1996 in English and held by 646 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this broad-ranging book, Daniel Hamermesh provides the first comprehensive picture of the disparate field of labor demand. The author reviews both the static and dynamic theories of labor demand, and provides evaluative summaries of the available empirical research in these two subject areas. Moreover, he uses both theory and evidence to establish a generalized framework for analyzing the impact of policies such as minimum wages, payroll taxes, job-security measures, unemployment insurance, and others. Covering every aspect of labor demand, this book uses material from a wide range of countries. Hamermesh also includes chapters on flows of employment through job creation and destruction in new and existing plants, the implications of labor demand for macroeconomics and the distribution of earnings, and the effects of heterogeneous labor for labor-market behavior in developing countries. For all labor economists, for graduate students specializing in the field of labor economics, for macroeconomists interested in public policy, and for public policy analysts interested in employment and pay, Labor Demand will be essential reading
Help or hindrance? : the economic implications of immigration for African Americans( Book )

6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 623 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Labor in the public and nonprofit sectors by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

22 editions published between 1975 and 2016 in English and held by 599 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Originally presented at a Conference on Labor in Nonprofit Industry and Government held at Princeton University, the studies are the first to provide an economic discussion of the public sector labor market. Melvin Reder examines the effect of the absence of the profit motive on employment and wage determination in the public sector. Orley Ashenfelter and Ronald Ehrenberg estimate the elasticities of demand for various types of labor employed by State and local governments. Theoretical ideas about behavior in nonprofit industries are employed by Richard Freeman to study the higher education industry. John Burton and Charles Krider try to predict the incidence of strikes in the public sector, while Donald Frey presents a model of the behavior of school boards in hiring faculty. The magnitude of the extra wage received by unionized public employees is compared by Daniel Hamermesh to that of private unionized workers in the same occupation. (Author)
Economic aspects of manpower training programs: theory and policy by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

12 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 356 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economics is everywhere by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

17 editions published between 2004 and 2014 in English and Chinese and held by 306 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

... 400 vignettes inspired by everyday events ... helps students to apply what they are learning in their introductory microeconomics courses ... - back cover
Unemployment insurance : global evidence of its effects on unemployment by B.C.) Fraser Institute (Vancouver( Book )

9 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and Undetermined and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Workdays, workhours, and work schedules : evidence for the United States and Germany by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

9 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and Undetermined and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The economics of time use by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

18 editions published between 2004 and 2010 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Unemployment insurance and the older American by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dynamic labor demand and adjustment costs( Book )

10 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tools or toys? : the impact of high technology on scholarly productivity by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

12 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Toys. The impact of computers on productivity has been examined directly on macro data and indirectly (on wages) using microeconomic data. This study examines the direct impact on the productivity of scholarship by considering how high technology might alter patterns of coauthoring of articles in economics and their influence. Using all coauthored articles in three major economics journals from 1970-79 and 1992-96, we find: 1) Sharp growth in the percentage of distant coauthorships (those between authors who were not in the same metropolitan areas in the four years prior to publication), as the theory predicts. Contrary to the theory: 2) Lower productivity (in terms of subsequent citations) of distant than close-coauthored papers; and 3) No decline in their relative disadvantage between the 1970s and 1990s. These findings are reconciled by the argument that high-technology functions as a consumption rather than an investment good. As such, it can be welfare-increasing without increasing productivity
Multilevel "general policy equilibria" : evidence from the American unemployment insurance tax ceiling by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

13 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In a large variety of multilevel political systems changes imposed by a higher authority alter the equilibrium panoply of lower- level policies. The new equilibrium depends on the type of change imposed and on the relative strengths of and differences among interested parties at the lower level. As an example we describe how the equilibrium parameters of American states' unemployment insurance (UI) systems are changed when the federal government raises the minimum annual earnings on which employers are taxed to finance UI benefits. Even though benefits determine total taxes at a point in time within state systems, bargaining among the interested parties alters the equilibrium level of benefits and taxes. We estimate a difference-in-differences' model describing total system costs in those states where federal increases in 1972, 1978 and 1983 forced increases in the tax ceiling. Holding constant changes in interstate differences in unemployment, where the federal constraint was binding costs rose roughly 20 percent above where they would have been. The increase was larger in those states where unionism, a measure of workers' legislative power, was greater. The theoretical model and the implied empirical analysis suggest themselves as examples for future research on a variety of topics in labor economics, public finance and international trade
Who works when? : evidence from the U.S. and Germany by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

17 editions published in 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study uses data for the U.S. from the May 1991 CPS and for Germany from the 1990 wave of the Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP) to analyze when people work during the day and week. The evidence shows: 1) Work in the evenings or at night is quite common in both countries, with around 7 percent of workers on the job even at 3AM; 2) Such work is performed mostly by people who are not shift workers; 3) Work at these times is inferior, in that it is performed disproportionately by people with little human capital; 4) Minority workers in the U.S. and the foreign-born in Germany are especially likely to work at these undesirable times; 5) Evening and night work is least likely in large metropolitan areas; 6) Spouses tend to work at the same time of the day; but 7) Young children break down the joint timing of spouses' work, with the burden of evening and night work falling disproportionately on working mothers. The findings demonstrate the gains to basing the analysis of work and leisure on data describing instantaneous time use
Changing inequality in markets for workplace amenities by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

12 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We know that earnings inequality has increased sharply in the United States since the late 1970s, but there has been no evidence on the changing inequality of nonmonetary aspects of work nor on how any such changes are related to changes in earnings. I begin by studying patterns of interindustry differences in occupational injuries during 1979-95, breaking the total burden of injuries into its components, risk of injury and injury duration. In those industries where earnings rose relatively, we observed a relative drop in injury rates and in the total burden of injuries. Obversely, during the 1960s interindustry wage differentials narrowed, a decline that was associated with an increase in the relative risk of injury in high-wage industries. Evidence for large sectors of Dutch industry from 1974-92 suggests that injury rates there fell most in sectors where wages grew most rapidly. Examination of another workplace disamenity, working evenings or nights, shows analogous results for the period 1973-91: This disamenity was increasingly borne by low-wage male workers. Changes in earnings inequality thus have understated absolute changes in inequality in the returns to work. All the outcomes are readily explicable as income effects of exogenous shocks to the distribution of full earnings in the presence of skill-neutral changes in the cost of reducing workplace disamenities. Under reasonable assumptions we can infer from the estimates that the demand for the amenities, workplace safety and desirable work times, is highly income-elastic
The art of labormetrics by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

13 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using a wide array of examples from the literature and from original estimates, this essay examines the pitfalls that make good empirical research in labor economics as much art as science. Appropriateness and cleanliness of data are considered, as are problems of extreme observations and interactions. The validity of attempts to produce exogeneity using instrumental variables and natural experiments' is examined, as are the treatment of selectivity and unobservable individual effects. Testing empirical results to ensure that they make sense is stressed along with the importance of clear, economical and useful presentation of those results
The timing of work time over time by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

16 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The incidence of evening and night work declined sharply in the United States between the early 1970s and the early 1990s, while the fraction of work performed at the fringes of the traditional regular working day grew. The secular decline in evening and night work did not result from industrial shifts or demographic changes. It was greatest at the upper end of the wage distribution, slowest among workers in the lowest quartile of wages. The observed changes in timing are consistent with and magnify the increase in wage inequality in the U.S. that occurred during this period. They are easily explained by a model that views evening/night work as a disamenity, with rising real incomes causing workers to shift away from such work in the presence of only neutral technical change in the profitability of work at different times of day
The changing distribution of job satisfaction by Daniel S Hamermesh( Book )

15 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The distribution of job satisfaction widened across cohorts of young men in the U.S. between 1978 and 1988, and between 1978 and 1996, in ways correlated with changing wage inequality. Satisfaction among workers in upper earnings quantiles rose relative to that of workers in lower quantiles. An identical phenomenon is observed among men in West Germany in response to a sharp increase in the relative earnings of high-wage men in the mid-1990s. Several hypotheses about the determinants of satisfaction are presented and examined using both cross-section data on these cohorts and panel data from the NLSY and the German SOEP. The evidence is most consistent with workers' regret about the returns to their investment in skills affecting their satisfaction. Job satisfaction is especially responsive to surprises in the returns to observable skills, less so to surprises in the returns to unobservables; and the effects of earnings shocks on job satisfaction dissipate over time
 
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Beauty pays : why attractive people are more successful
Alternative Names
Daniel S. Hamermesh American economist

Daniel S. Hamermesh Amerikaans econoom

Daniel S. Hamermesh amerikansk ekonom

Daniel S. Hamermesh amerikansk økonom

Daniel S. Hamermesh US-amerikanischer Wirtschaftswissenschaftler

Hamermesh, D. S.

Hamermesh, D. S. 1943-

Hamermesh, Daniel 1943-

Hamermesh, Daniel S. 1943-

Hamermesh, Daniel S. (Daniel Selim), 1943-

Hamermesh, Daniel Selim 1943-

Hamermesh, David S. 1943-

해머메시, 대니얼 S

Languages
English (285)

Chinese (4)

Covers
The economics of work and payLabor demandHelp or hindrance? : the economic implications of immigration for African AmericansEconomics is everywhereThe economics of time use