WorldCat Identities

Segal, Charles 1936-2002

Overview
Works: 183 works in 563 publications in 5 languages and 19,980 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Tragedies (Drama)  Bibliography 
Roles: Author, Translator, Editor, Author of introduction, Other, win, Instrumentalist, Composer, Film editor
Classifications: PA4414.A7, 882.01
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Charles Segal
Oedipus tyrannus : tragic heroism and the limits of knowledge by Charles Segal( Book )

22 editions published between 1993 and 2001 in English and held by 1,283 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tragedy and civilization : an interpretation of Sophocles by Charles Segal( Book )

21 editions published between 1981 and 1999 in English and held by 993 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Antigone by Sophocles( Book )

19 editions published between 2003 and 2007 in English and held by 836 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Publisher's description: Echoing through western culture for more than two millennia, Sophocles' play has been a touchstone of thinking about human conflict and human tragedy, the role of the divine in human life, and the degree to which men and women are the creators of their own destiny. This exciting new translation of the Antigone is both extremely faithful to the Greek and poetically striking and convincing
Dionysiac poetics and Euripides' Bacchae by Charles Segal( Book )

32 editions published between 1982 and 2002 in English and Japanese and held by 827 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his play Bacchae, Euripides chooses as his central figure the god who crosses the boundaries among god, man, and beast, between reality and imagination, and between art and madness. In so doing, he explores what in tragedy is able to reach beyond the social, ritual, and historical context from which tragedy itself rises. Charles Segal's reading of Euripides' Bacchae builds gradually from concrete details of cult, setting, and imagery to the work's implications for the nature of myth, language, and theater. This volume presents the argument that the Dionysiac poetics of the play characterize a world view and an art form that can admit logical contradictions and hold them in suspension
Sophocles' tragic world : divinity, nature, society by Charles Segal( Book )

28 editions published between 1995 and 1998 in English and held by 822 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Much has been written about the heroic figures of Sophocles' powerful dramas. Now Charles Segal focuses our attention not on individual heroes and heroines, but on the world that inspired and motivated their actions - a universe of family, city, nature, and the supernatural. He shows how these ancient masterpieces offer insight into the abiding question of tragedy: how one can make sense of a world that involves so much apparently meaningless violence and suffering. In a series of engagingly written interconnected essays, Segal studies five of Sophocles' seven extant plays: Ajax, Oedipus Tyrannus, Philoctetes, Antigone, and the often neglected Trachinian Women. He examines the language and structure of the plays from several interpretive perspectives, drawing both on traditional philological analysis and on current literary and cultural theory
The heroic paradox : essays on Homer, Sophocles, and Aristophanes by Cedric Hubbell Whitman( Book )

10 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 795 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Orpheus : the myth of the poet by Charles Segal( Book )

23 editions published between 1989 and 1995 in English and Italian and held by 750 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume surveys the literary treatment of the Orpheus myth as the myth of the essence of poetry - the ability to encounter the fullest possible intensity of beauty and sorrow and to transform them into song. The first half of the book concentrates on the ancient literary tradition, from the myth's Greek origins through the influential poetic versions of Ovid and Virgil and its treatment by other Latin authors such as Horace and Seneca. Later chapters focus on the continuities of the myth in modern literature, including the poetry of H.D., Rukeyser, Rich, Ashbery, and, especially, Rilke. The author's leitmotif throughout is the relation of poetry to art, love and death, the 'three points of the Orphic triangle'. Through close readings of individual texts, he shows how various versions of the myth oscillate between a poetry of transcendence that asserts its power over the necessities of nature - including the ultimate necessity, death - and a poetry that celebrates its immersion in the stream of life
Interpreting Greek tragedy : myth, poetry, text by Charles Segal( Book )

9 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and Undetermined and held by 687 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Singers, heroes, and gods in the Odyssey by Charles Segal( Book )

17 editions published between 1994 and 2001 in English and held by 546 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A special charm of the Odyssey, according to Charles Segal, is the way it transports readers to fascinating places. Yet despite the appeal of its narrative, the Odyssey is fully understood only when its style, design, and mythical patterns are taken into account as well. Bringing a new richness to readings of this epic, Segal looks closely at key forms of social and personal organization which Odysseus encounters in his voyages. Segal also considers such topics as the relationship between bard and audience, the implications of the Odyssey's self-consciousness about its own poetics, and Homer's treatment of the nature of poetry
The rhetoric of imitation : genre and poetic memory in Virgil and other Latin poets by Gian Biagio Conte( Book )

19 editions published between 1986 and 1996 in English and held by 545 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poetry and myth in ancient pastoral : essays on Theocritus and Virgil by Charles Segal( Book )

22 editions published between 1981 and 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 526 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Collected in this volume are fifteen essays, previously published in a wide variety of journals, on the pastoral poetry of Theocritus and Virgil.Originally published in 1981.The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905
Lucretius on death and anxiety : poetry and philosophy in De Rerum Natura by Charles Segal( Book )

19 editions published between 1990 and 2016 in English and Italian and held by 506 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In a fresh interpretation of Lucretius's On the Nature of Things, Charles Segal reveals this great poetical account of Epicurean philosophy as an important and profound document for the history of Western attitudes toward death. He shows that this poem, aimed at promoting spiritual tranquillity, confronts two anxieties about death not addressed in Epicurus's abstract treatment--the fear of the process of dying and the fear of nothingness. Lucretius, Segal argues, deals more specifically with the body in dying because he draws on the Roman concern with corporeality as well as on the rich traditions of epic and tragic poetry on mortality.Segal explains how Lucretius's sensitivity to the vulnerability of the body's boundaries connects the deaths of individuals with the deaths of worlds, thereby placing human death into the poem's larger context of creative and destructive energies in the universe. The controversial ending of the poem, which describes the plague at Athens, is thus the natural culmination of a theme developed over the course of the work.Originally published in 1990.The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905
Euripides and the poetics of sorrow : art, gender, and commemoration in Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba by Charles Segal( Book )

16 editions published in 1993 in English and Italian and held by 501 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pindar's mythmaking : the fourth Pythian ode by Charles Segal( Book )

15 editions published between 1986 and 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 475 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Combining historical and philological method with contemporary literary analysis, this study of Pindar's longest and most elaborate victory ode, the Fourth Pythian, traces the underlying mythical patterns, implicit poetics, and processes of mythopoesis that animate his poetry
Language and desire in Seneca's Phaedra by Charles Segal( Book )

13 editions published between 1986 and 2017 in English and held by 466 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The theme of the mutilation of the corpse in the Iliad by Charles Segal( Book )

20 editions published between 1971 and 1972 in English and Multiple languages and held by 384 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Landscape in Ovid's Metamorphoses. A study in the transformations of a literary symbol by Charles Segal( Book )

18 editions published in 1969 in 3 languages and held by 380 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Bacchae by Euripides( Book )

15 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Regarded by many as Euripides' masterpiece, Bakkhai examines both the horror and the beauty of the religious ecstasy that Dionysos brings to Thebes. His offer of closeness to nature and freedom from the constraints of civilization, especially for women, excites bitter resistance as well as fanatical acceptance." "Disguised as a young holy man and accompanied by his band of Asian worshipers, the god Dionysos arrives in Greece at Thebes, proclaims his godhood and his new religion, and drives the Theban women mad. When the Theban king, Pentheus, tries to imprison him, Dionysos afflicts Pentheus himself with madness and leads him, dressed as a bacchant, to the mountains, where his own mother, Agaue, and her companions tear him to pieces in an insane Bacchic frenzy."
Aglaia : the poetry of Alcman, Sappho, Pindar, Bacchylides, and Corinna by Charles Segal( Book )

13 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 279 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this landmark collection of essays, renowned classicist Charles Segal offers detailed analyses of major texts from archaic and early classical Greek poetry; in particular, works of Alcman, Mimnermus, Sappho, Pindar, Bacchylides, and Corinna. Segal provides close readings of the texts, and then studies the literary form and language of early Greek lyric, the poets' conception of their aims and their art, the use of mythical paradigms, and the relation of the poems to their social context. A recurrent theme is the recognition of the fragility and brevity of mortal happiness and the consciousn
The Bacchae, and other plays by Euripides( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 167 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Through their sheer range, daring innovation, flawed but eloquent characters and intriguing plots, the plays of Euripides have shocked and stimulated audiences since the fifth century BC. Phoenician Women portrays the rival sons of King Oedipus and their mother's doomed attempts at reconciliation, while Orestes shows a son ravaged with guilt after the vengeful murder of his mother. In The Bacchae, a king mistreats a newcomer to his land, little knowing that he is the god Dionysus disguised as a mortal, while in Iphigenia at Aulis, the Greek leaders take the horrific decision to sacrifice a princess to gain favour from the gods in their mission to Troy. Finally, the Rhesus depicts a world of espionage between the warring Greek and Trojan camps."--Jacket
 
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Oedipus tyrannus : tragic heroism and the limits of knowledge
Alternative Names
Charles Segal American classical philologist

Charles Segal Amerikaans klassiek filoloog (1936-2002)

Charles Segal filologo e critico letterario statunitense

Charles Segal US-amerikanischer Klassischer Philologe

Segal, C. 1936-

Segal, C. 1936-2002

Segal, C. (Charles)

Segal, C. (Charles), 1936-

Segal, C. (Charles), 1936-2002

Segal, Charles

Segal, Charles 1936-

Segal, Charles P. 1936-

Segal, Charles P. 1936-2002

Segal, Charles P. (Charles Paul)

Segal, Charles P. (Charles Paul), 1936-

Segal, Charles P. (Charles Paul), 1936-2002

Segal Charles Paul

Segal, Charles Paul 1936-

Segal, Charles Paul 1936-2002

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Tragedy and civilization : an interpretation of SophoclesAntigoneDionysiac poetics and Euripides' BacchaeSophocles' tragic world : divinity, nature, societyOrpheus : the myth of the poetSingers, heroes, and gods in the OdysseyEuripides and the poetics of sorrow : art, gender, and commemoration in Alcestis, Hippolytus, and HecubaPindar's mythmaking : the fourth Pythian ode