WorldCat Identities

Grayson, J. Paul (John Paul) 1944-

Overview
Works: 65 works in 137 publications in 2 languages and 1,204 library holdings
Genres: History  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: HN107, 301.2420971
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by J. Paul Grayson
Prophecy and protest : social movements in twentieth-century Canada by S. D Clark( Book )

6 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Class, state, ideology and change : Marxist perspectives on Canada by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

6 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 152 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Paddles & wheels : everyday life and travel in Canada by Linda M Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduction to sociology : an alternate approach( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Citizen participation in urban planning : the Guelph alternative by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

6 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corporate strategy & plant closures : the SKF experience by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The student experience at York University : the effects of income, race, and gender over four years by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents findings of a longitudinal study of student experiences and how they relate to college outcomes. The study was begun in 1994 and followed approximately 550 students attending the six daytime faculties at York University (Ontario) to the end of 1998. Data included yearly student surveys, focus group meetings conducted with first-year students, and administrative records. Particular attention was paid to differences among faculties, genders, and ethno-racial groups. Findings led to five general conclusions: (1) there was some improvement in students' in-class experiences over the four-year period; (2) students became less involved in many out-of-class activities but maintained a constant amount of interaction with friends over the four years; (3) overall, differences between first and fourth years were not large; (4) in general, the experiences of South Asian and Chinese origin students were relatively negative; and (5) there were virtually no differences based on family income and gender, though experiences varied somewhat among faculties. Individual chapters address the following topics: the university experience, the sample, reasons for attending the university, course work and classroom experiences, experiences outside of class, sources of support for studies, external influences, group experiences, and future jobs. (Contains approximately 85 references.) (Db)
Globe and Mail reports, student experiences, and negative racial encounters by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examined the off-campus experiences of negative racial encounters among first-year students at York University in Ontario (Canada). Focus groups were conducted with 48 Black students, 26 students of Chinese origin, and 33 students of Italian or Portuguese origin in 1993-94. In descending order of frequency, students identified stores, jobs, schools, buses/trains, restaurants, encounters with police, everyday activities, offices, and media as sites in which they had negative racial encounters. In contrast to the frequency with which various sites were identified by students, articles dealing with "visible minorities" published by the Toronto (Ontario) "Globe and Mail" since 1977 focused overwhelmingly on sites in which the police were involved and, to a lesser extent, jobs. The focus group discussions indicated that students of all racial backgrounds may have negative racial encounters, that students of certain races/origins may have negative encounters in some sites while students of other races/origins may have similar experiences in other sites, that students felt that negative racial encounters were more prevalent off-campus than on-campus, and that some students talked about their negative experiences, particularly in stores and jobs, in a way that suggests an organization of experience in terms of systemic racism. (Mdm)
The 'visible minority' question by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public attitudes toward education for the 'gifted' in Ontario by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

3 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report discusses the findings of a survey that asked 1,048 Ontario residents whether special enrichment classes should be provided to bright students at any cost, whether bright students should be provided with special enrichment classes only if resources are not taken away from classes of average students, or if bright students should not be provided with special enrichment classes at all. Results found: (1) the majority (63 percent) of participants gave only qualified support for special gifted education, 19 percent gave no support, and only 13 percent gave full support to education for the gifted; (2) those aged 60 or older were more inclined than others to give no support to special education for the gifted; (3) no differences were found between public and separate school supporters; (4) the lower the education of the participant, the greater the tendency not to support special education for the gifted; and (5) the higher the income the smaller the percentage giving no support to education for the gifted. (Contains 8 figures and 14 references.) (Cr)
Racial origin and withdrawal from university by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examined voluntary and involuntary withdrawal rates of students of various racial origins at York University in Ontario (Canada). Data were obtained from three surveys of first-year students conducted in 1993, 1994, and 1995, and involving 1,864 students. Information on Ontario Academic Credit (oac) marks, first year grade point averages (GPAs), and enrollment status at the beginning of the second year was obtained from school records. It was found that differences in retention rates for Blacks and students of South Asian, Chinese, "other" non-European, and European origins were small. Only gender, perceptions of the value of a degree, a belief that students will return for a second year, and gpa were of utility in predicting voluntary withdrawal at the end of the first year. Increased hours of employment and living in temporary accommodations contributed to involuntary withdrawal. Similarly, being Black or of "other" racial origin also had a slight effect on the probability of not returning for a second year. (Contains 48 references.) (Mdm)
The experience of female and minority students in first year science by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examined the academic and social experiences of first-year female and visible minority group science students at "Big u," a large multi-racial and multi-cultural commuter university, located in a central Canadian city. In 1992, a total of 498 incoming science students were surveyed in September, November, and February-March of the first year. Response rates for the surveys were 89 percent, 84 percent, and 68 percent, respectively. Data were also gathered through focus groups and administrative records. The study found that first-year grade point averages varied by neither gender nor minority group status. Overall, female and minority group students reported that they had been treated by faculty, staff, and students in the same way that other students had been treated. Female students reported more contacts with faculty and staff, belonged to fewer campus organizations, and participated in fewer sports activities than male students. Males reported being more satisfied with the quality of instruction and their grades than did female students. When compared to other groups, female and minority group students encountered more problems relevant to university life, and female students indicated less self-confidence. (Mdm)
Quality of life in Canadian cities : Toronto 1998 by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Racialization and black student identity at York University by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The focus group approach with black students and students of Chinese origin at York University in Ontario (Canada) was used to examine attitudes of these groups toward the concept of "visible minority." The results of eight focus group sessions conducted with 48 black students indicated that while 90 percent of the students did consider themselves visible minorities, many nonetheless regarded the term as derogatory. In previous focus groups, only half of the students of Chinese origin considered themselves members of a visible minority group. More importantly, the characteristic that might make black students visible--color--was seen as only one component of an identity that includes culture and origin. Overall, although black students supported equity measures for visible minorities and women, when confronted with a situation in which class obviously confers disadvantage, support for hiring based on visible minority and gender status alone was weakened substantially. (Mdm)
Race on campus : outcomes of the first year experience at York University by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examined the effects of race on the experiences and outcomes of first-year students at York University (Ontario). Data were collected through a survey of 1,093 students at their time of entry in September 1992 and a survey of 1,129 students conducted in February-March of 1993. The study found that students' socioeconomic backgrounds varied by race, with the families of students of European origin having higher incomes than others, while the parental education of students of East Indian origin was higher than for other groups. The results also indicated that black students, more than all others, believed that they had been academically prepared for the university and felt more competent than their peers. The study found that black students had the lowest grade point averages (GPAs) while students of European origin had the highest. The difference between the means, however, was only 2 percent. Regression analysis indicated that race, per se, had little if any impact on educational outcomes. Explanations for differences were most likely to be found in the different classroom experiences of students of different races and the degree of academic involvement on campus. (Contains 34 references.) (Mdm)
Gender and minority group differences in desired outcomes of adult post-secondary education : the student perspective by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study surveyed 1,091 students admitted to Atkinson College for Fall 1993 to determine the outcomes new adult students expected from their university experience and the degree to which desired outcomes varied by gender and visible minority status. Analysis of responses showed the following: knowledge acquisition and career advancement were the most important outcomes for newly admitted students; civic improvement and improvements in family relations were regarded as outcomes of intermediate importance; and social involvement and family approval were regarded as relatively unimportant. The importance of particular outcomes varied with the general social characteristics of students; however, differences were not large. Although the importance of certain outcomes varied by gender and/or visible minority group status, these variables only explained a small amount of total variance. The importance of many outcomes also varied by student characteristics such as length of time in the country, marital status, and having children in the home. In essence, although gender and visible minority group status differences existed with regard to the importance of the desired outcomes of the university experience, differences were small. (The paper contains 7 data tables and 16 references.) (Ylb)
Research on retention and attrition by J. Paul Grayson( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Les recherches sur le maintien et la diminution des effectifs etudiants by J. Paul Grayson( )

1 edition published in 2003 in French and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Grayson, John Paul

Grayson, John Paul 1944-

Languages
English (54)

French (3)