WorldCat Identities

Nickles, Thomas 1943-

Overview
Works: 40 works in 140 publications in 3 languages and 3,954 library holdings
Genres: History  Conference papers and proceedings  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Biography  Bibliography  Academic theses  Case studies 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Thomas Nickles
Thomas Kuhn by Thomas Nickles( )

17 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and Spanish and held by 2,181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This volume offers an introduction to Kuhn's life and work and then considers the implications of Kuhn's work for philosophy, cognitive psychology, social studies of science, and feminism. The volume is more than a retrospective on Kuhn, exploring future developments of cognitive and information sciences along Kuhnian lines." "Outside of philosophy, the volume will be of particular interest to professionals and students in cognitive science, history of science, science studies, and cultural studies."--Jacket
Scientific discovery : case studies by Reno) Guy L. Leonard Memorial Conference in Philosophy$ (1st : 1978 : University of Nevada( Book )

19 editions published between 1978 and 1980 in 3 languages and held by 490 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scientific discovery, logic, and rationality by Guy L. Leonard Memorial Conference in Philosophy( Book )

19 editions published between 1978 and 1980 in 3 languages and held by 482 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is fast becoming a cliche that scientific discovery is being rediscovered. For two philosophical generations (that of the Founders and that of the Followers of the logical positivist and logical empiricist movements), discovery had been consigned to the domain of the intractable, the ineffable, the inscrutable. The philosophy of science was focused on the so-called context of justification as its proper domain. More recently, as the exclusivity of the logical reconstruc- tion program in philosophy of science came under question, and as the critique of justification developed within the framework of logical and epistemological analysis, the old question of scientific discovery, which had been put on the back burner, began to emerge once again. Emphasis on the relation of the history of science to the philosophy of science, and attention to the question of theory change and theory replacement, also served to legitimate a new concern with the origins of scientific change to be found within discovery and invention. How welcome then to see what a wide range of issues and what a broad representation of philosophers and historians of science have been brought together in the present two volumes of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science! For what these volumes achieve, in effect, is the continuation of a tradition which had once been strong in the philosophy of science - namely, that tradition which addressed the question of scientific discovery as a central question in the understanding of science
Models of discovery and creativity by J Meheus( )

22 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 466 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the origin of the modern sciences, our views on discovery and creativity had a remarkable history. Originally, discovery was seen as an integral part of methodology and the logic of discovery as algorithmic or nearly algorithmic. During the nineteenth century, conceptions in line with romanticism led to the famous opposition between the context of discovery and the context of justification, culminating in a view that banned discovery from methodology. The revival of the methodological investigation of discovery, which started some thirty years ago, derived its major impetus from historical and sociological studies of the sciences and from developments within cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence. Today, a large majority of philosophers of science agrees that the classical conception as well as the romantic conception are mistaken. Against the classical conception, it is generally accepted that truly novel discoveries are not the result of simply applying some standardized procedure. Against the romantic conception, it is rejected that discoveries are produced by unstructured flashes of insight. An especially important result of the contemporary study concerns the availability of (descriptive and normative) models for explaining discoveries and creative processes. Descriptive models mainly aim at explaining the origin of novel products; normative models moreover address the question how rational researchers should proceed when confronted with problems for which a standard procedure is missing. The present book provides an overview of these models and of the important changes they induced within methodology. As appears from several papers, the methodological study of discovery and creativity led to profound changes in our conceptions of justification and acceptance, of rationality, of scientific change, and of conceptual change. The book contains contributions from both historians and philosophers of science. All of them, however, are methodological in the contemporary sense of the term. The central values of this methodology are empirical accurateness, clarity and precision, and rationality. The different contributions realize these values by their interdisciplinary nature. Some philosophically oriented papers rely on historical case studies and results from the cognitive sciences, others on recent results from the computer sciences and/or non-standard logics. The historically oriented papers address central philosophical questions and hypotheses
Models and inferences in science by Emiliano Ippoliti( )

6 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 146 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The book answers long-standing questions on scientific modeling and inference across multiple perspectives and disciplines, including logic, mathematics, physics and medicine. The different chapters cover a variety of issues, such as the role models play in scientific practice; the way science shapes our concept of models; ways of modeling the pursuit of scientific knowledge; the relationship between our concept of models and our concept of science. The book also discusses models and scientific explanations; models in the semantic view of theories; the applicability of mathematical models to the real world and their effectiveness; the links between models and inferences; and models as a means for acquiring new knowledge. It analyzes different examples of models in physics, biology, mathematics and engineering. Written for researchers and graduate students, it provides a cross-disciplinary reference guide to the notion and the use of models and inferences in science
Scientific Discovery: Case Studies by Thomas Nickles( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The history of science is articulated by moments of discovery. Yet, these 'moments' are not simple or isolated events in science. Just as a scientific discovery illuminates our understanding of nature or of society, and reveals new connections among phenomena, so too does the history of scientific activity and the analysis of scientific reasoning illuminate the processes which give rise to moments of discovery and the complex network of consequences which follow upon such moments. Understanding discovery has not been, until recently, a major concern of modem philosophy of science. Whether the act of discoyery was regarded as mysterious and inexplicable, or obvious and in no need of explanation, modem philosophy of science in effect bracketed the question. It concentrated instead on the logic of scientific explanation or on the issues of validation or justification of scientific theories or laws. The recent revival of interest in the context of discovery, indeed in the acts of discovery, on the part of philosophers and historians of science, represents no one particular method'ological or philosophical orientation. It proceeds as much from an empiricist and analytical approach as from a sociological or historical one; from considerations of the logic of science as much as from the alogical or extralogical contexts of scientific tho'¢tt and practice. But, in general, this new interest focuses sharply on the actual historical and contem­ porary cases of scientific discovery, and on an examination of the act or moment of discovery in situ
Scientific Discovery, Logic, and Rationality by Thomas Nickles( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is fast becoming a cliche that scientific discovery is being rediscovered. For two philosophical generations (that of the Founders and that of the Followers of the logical positivist and logical empiricist movements), discovery had been consigned to the domain of the intractable, the ineffable, the inscrutable. The philosophy of science was focused on the so-called context of justification as its proper domain. More recently, as the exclusivity of the logical reconstruc­ tion program in philosophy of science came under question, and as the critique of justification developed within the framework of logical and epistemological analysis, the old question of scientific discovery, which had been put on the back burner, began to emerge once again. Emphasis on the relation of the history of science to the philosophy of science, and attention to the question of theory change and theory replacement, also served to legitimate a new concern with the origins of scientific change to be found within discovery and invention. How welcome then to see what a wide range of issues and what a broad representation of philosophers and historians of science have been brought together in the present two volumes of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science! For what these volumes achieve, in effect, is the continuation of a tradition which had once been strong in the philosophy of science - namely, that tradition which addressed the question of scientific discovery as a central question in the understanding of science
Characterizing the robustness of science : after the practice turn in philosophy of science by Léna Soler( )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
PSA 1982 : proceedings of the 1982 biennial meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association by Philosophy of Science Association( Book )

10 editions published between 1982 and 1983 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scientific revolutions by Thomas Nickles( )

in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PSA 1982 : proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association by Philosophy of Science Association( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association by Philosophy of Science Association( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scientific discovery : Case studies. 1. Guy L. Leonard Memorial Conference in Philosophy, University of Nevada, Reno, October 29-31, 1978 by Thomas Nickles( Book )

3 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PSA 1982 : proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association by Philosophy of Science Association( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Subaerial lithic microbial habitats as potential astrobiological analogs by Thomas Nickles( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The atmospheric interface at the surface of rocks has long been recognized as a difficult environment for microbial survival. These subaerial surfaces are exposed to temperature extremes, elevated solar radiation (insolation), and low levels of water and nutrients. However, a diverse array of microbes still manages to establish subaerial lithic habitats (SLHs) in every corner of this planet. These organisms survive by establishing intimate relationships with the minerals they dwell upon and the elements brought to them by the wind and rain. They form interdependent communities that offer survival strategies more versatile than anything they could achieve on their own. Chapter I explores the existing literature to see how organisms interact with the global geochemistry to establish a network of interrelated biogeochemical cycles. These cycles determine the bioavailability of nutrients and energy for all living organisms. Chapter II documents an assessment of the test program for the Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) Sample Acquisition / Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system. We determined that the planned tests should adequately assess the surface sampling capabilities of the MSL. In Chapter III we applied biogeochemical concepts to propose methods for detecting life on Mars. Chapter IV details the design, development, construction, test, and operation of an arid conditions environmental simulator (ACES) for the study of a rock coating (varnish) that may be formed by lithic organisms on Earth and Mars. This work led to a new model that may answer long standing questions about rock varnish. We detail in Chapter V how lithic organisms can establish subaerial biofilms when adequate surface water is available. Organisms, aeolian dusts, and ferromanganese metabolic byproducts are deposited into layers of clay-enriched extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS) to eventually form a protovarnish. Finally, in Chapter VI we begin the characterization of a microbial community in the surface grains of sandstones collected in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. We proposed a model where the biogeochemical cycling of iron may form the metabolic backbone for this community. The study of rock varnish-forming biofilms and Antarctic iron-cycling endolithic communities present interesting analogs to help us better understand the astrobiological possibilities of life
Proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association by Philosophy of Science Association( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The structure and interrelationships of physical theories by Thomas Jacob Nickles( Book )

3 editions published in 1969 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scientific discovery, logic, and rationality : 1. Guy L. Leonard Memorial Conference in Philosophy, University of Nevada, Reno, October 29-31, 1978 by Thomas Nickles( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PSA 1982. proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association : Symposia( Book )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Thomas Kuhn
Covers
Scientific discovery : case studiesScientific discovery, logic, and rationalityModels of discovery and creativity
Languages
English (115)

Italian (3)

Spanish (1)