WorldCat Identities

Attebery, Brian 1951-

Overview
Works: 46 works in 154 publications in 2 languages and 8,930 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Fantasy fiction  Science fiction  Short stories  Novellas  Novels  Utopian fiction  War fiction  Sources 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Author of introduction, Redactor
Classifications: PS3562.E42, 813.54
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Brian Attebery
The fantasy tradition in American literature : from Irving to Le Guin by Brian Attebery( Book )

14 editions published between 1980 and 2004 in English and held by 1,348 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Includes chapters on L. Frank Baum and Ursula Le Guin, with material on Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Rice Burroughs, James Branch Cabell, H.P. Lovecraft, Ray Bradbury, Edward Eager, and James Thurber, among others
Stories about stories : fantasy and the remaking of myth by Brian Attebery( )

16 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 1,250 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Myth is oral, collective, sacred, and timeless. Fantasy is a modern literary mode and a popular entertainment. Yet the two have always been inextricably intertwined. Stories about Stories examines fantasy as an arena in which different ways of understanding myth compete and new relationships with myth are worked out. The book offers a comprehensive history of the modern fantastic as well as an argument about its nature and importance. Specific chapters cover the origins of fantasy in the Romantic search for localized myths, fantasy versions of the Modernist turn toward the primitive, the post-Tolkienian exploration of world mythologies, post-colonial reactions to the exploitation of indigenous sacred narratives by Western writers, fantasies based in Christian belief alongside fundamentalist attempts to stamp out the form, and the emergence of ever-more sophisticated structures such as metafiction through which to explore mythic constructions of reality
Parabolas of science fiction by Brian Attebery( )

10 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1,147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As a geometric term, parabola suggests a narrative trajectory or story arc. In science fiction, parabolas take us from the known to the unknown. More concrete than themes, more complex than motifs, parabolas are combinations of meaningful setting, character, and action that lend themselves to endless redefinition and jazzlike improvisation. The fourteen original essays in this collection explore how the field of science fiction has developed as a complex of repetitions, influences, arguments, and broad conversations. This particular feature of the genre has been the source of much critical commentary, most notably through growing interest in the ?sf megatext,? a continually expanding archive of shared images, situations, plots, characters, settings, and themes found in science fiction across media. Contributors include Jane Donawerth, Terry Dowling, L. Timmel Duchamp, Rachel Haywood Ferreira, Pawel Frelik, David M. Higgins, Amy J. Ransom, John Rieder, Nicholas Ruddick, Graham Sleight, Gary K. Wolfe, and Lisa Yaszek--from publisher's website
The Norton book of science fiction : North American science fiction, 1960-1990 by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

10 editions published between 1993 and 1994 in English and held by 900 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The very best North American Science Fiction, 1960-1990 Includes Index
Decoding gender in science fiction by Brian Attebery( )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 892 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From supermen and wonderwomen to pregnant kings and housewives in space, characters in science fiction have long defied traditional gender roles. Sexual identity is often exaggerated, obscured, or eliminated altogether. In this pioneering study, Brian Attebery examines how science fiction writers have incorporated, explored, and transformed conventional concepts of gender. While drawing on feminist insights, the book analyzes characters of both genders in works written by men and women that portray the invisible but always powerful presence of sexual difference as a shaping force within science fiction. In doing so, it presents a sexual difference as a shaping force within science fiction. In doing so, it presents a revised history of the genre, from its origins in Gothic works like Mary Shelley's Frankenstein through its development up to - and a little beyond - the present day. Attebery also enriches this history by highlighting critically neglected writers, such as Gwyneth Jones, James Morrow, and Raphael Carter, and by opening fresh perspectives on the field's best-known authors, including Robert A. Heinlein, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Philip K. Dick. Written in lucid prose with engaging style, Decoding Gender in Science Fiction illuminates new ways to uncover meaning in both gender and genre. -- from back cover
The complete Orsinia : Malafrena stories and songs by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 653 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The inaugural volume of Library of America's Ursula K. Le Guin edition gathers her complete Orsinian writings, enchanting, richly imagined historical fiction collected here for the first time. Written before Le Guin turned to science fiction, the novel Malafrena is a tale of love and duty set in the central European country of Orsinia in the early nineteenth century, when it is ruled by the Austrian empire. The stories originally published in Orsinian Tales (1976) offer brilliantly rendered episodes of personal drama set against a history that spans Orsinia's emergence as an independent kingdom in the twelfth century to its absorption by the Eastern Bloc after World War II. The volume is rounded out by two additional stories that bring the history of Orsinia up to 1989, the poem 'Folksong from the Montayna Province, ' Le Guin's first published work, and two never before published songs in the Orisinian language."--Page 4 of cover
Strategies of fantasy by Brian Attebery( Book )

13 editions published between 1992 and 2008 in English and Japanese and held by 537 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brian Attebery's "strategies of fantasy" include not only the writer's strategies for inventing believable impossibilities, but also the reader's strategies for enjoying, challenging, and conspiring with the text. Drawing on a number of current literary theories (but avoiding most of their jargon), Attebery makes a case for fantasy as a significant movement within postmodern literature rather than as a simple exercise of nostalgia. Attebery examines recent and classic fantasies by Ursula K. Le Guin, John Crowley, J.R.R. Tolkien, Diana Wynne Jones, and Gene Wolfe, among others. In both its popular and postmodern incarnations, fantastic fiction exhibits a remarkable capacity for reinventing narrative conventions. Attebery shows how plots, characters, settings, storytelling frameworks, gender divisions, and references to cultural texts such as history and science are all called into question the moment the marvelous is admitted into a story. In the early chapters, the author sorts out some of the confusion about the term fantasy, distinguishing the fantastic as a technique from fantasy as a popular formula and a literary genre. Looking back to the early reception of Tolkien's trend-setting epic fantasy, he points out how critical theory at the time was simply unable to account for either the strengths or the weaknesses of The Lord of the Rings. By contrast, critical methods developed for coping with postmodernist metafictions are shown to apply equally well to the genre of fantasy. Having worked primarily with older fantasies in his study of The Fantasy Tradition in American Literature, Attebery focuses here on important recent examples such as Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Suzette Haden Elgin's Ozark Trilogy, and John Crowley's Little, Big. Analysis of these texts shows not only that fantasy scholarship can learn from contemporary theory, but also that a close look at fantasy can overturn common assumptions about the nature of narrative. Rather than drawing definitive boundaries for the genre, Attebery proposes a description of fantasy as a "fuzzy set": a grouping based on perceived resemblance to one or more central examples rather than on any particular features shared by the whole set. For many readers and writers, the central example has long been Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, although Attebery points out that newer forms such as women's coming-of-age stories, postmodernist metafiction, science fantasy, and "real world" fantasy may indicate a shift or expansion of the popular conception of the genre
Always coming home by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

4 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 433 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A master builder of faraway, fantastic worlds, Ursula K. Le Guin, at mid-career, found in her native California the inspiration for what was to be her greatest literary construction: nothing less than an entire ethnography of a future society, the Kesh, living in a post-apocalyptic Napa Valley. This Library of America edition of her 1985 classic Always Coming Home, prepared in close consultation with the author, features new material added by Le Guin just before her death, including for the first time the complete text of the novella-within-the-novel, Dangerous People. Survivors of an ecological catastrophe brought on by heedless industrialization, the Kesh live in hard-won balance with their environment and between genders. Le Guin meditates here more deeply and more personally on themes explored earlier in The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed. ... Always Coming Home is comprised of 'translations' of a wide array of Kesh writings: a three-part narrative by a woman named Stone Telling recounting her travels beyond the Valley, where she lives with the mysterious, patriarchal Condor people; 'Chapter 2' of a novel by the brilliant Kesh writer Wordriver, in which a woman's disappearance reveals hidden tensions within and beyond her clan; poems; folk tales for adults and children; verse dramas; recipes; even an alphabet and glossary of the Kesh language. To this extraordinary architecture, Le Guin has added a special section of new material, including the two 'missing' chapters of Wordriver's Dangerous People, newly discovered poetry and meditations of the Kesh people, and a guide to their syntax. With evocative illustrations by artist Margaret Chodos-Irvine, and Le Guin's own hand-drawn maps, the cumulative effect is, in the words of Samuel R. Delany, 'Le Guin's most consistently lyric and luminous book.'"--Front dust jacket flap
Decoding gender in science fiction by Brian Attebery( )

11 editions published between 2002 and 2014 in English and held by 371 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From Frankenstein to futuristic feminist utopias, Decoding Gender in Science Fiction examines the ways science fiction writers have incorporated, explored, and revised conventional notions of sexual difference. Attebery traces a fascinating history of men's and women's writing that covertly or overtly investigates conceptions of gender, suggesting new perspectives on the genre
Hainish novels & stories by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

5 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 316 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For the first time, all of Ursula K. Le Guin's Hainish novels and stories are brought together in a single edition, complete and with new introductions by the author. Beginning in the 1960s and 70s, Le Guin imagined a galactic confederation of human colonies founded by the planet Hain--an array of worlds whose divergent societies was the result of both evolution and genetic engineering.--From the publisher
Idaho folklife : homesteads to headstones( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 264 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hainish novels & stories by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

3 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"For the first time, all of Ursula K. Le Guin's Hainish novels and stories are brought together in a single edition, complete and with new introductions by the author. Beginning in the 1960s and 70s, these remarkable works redrew the map of modern science fiction. In such visionary masterworks as the Nebula and Hugo Award winners The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed, Le Guin imagined a galactic confederation of human colonies founded by the planet Hain--an array of worlds whose divergent societies was the result of both evolution and genetic engineering."--
Hainish novels & stories by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

3 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 156 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For more than a half century, Ursula K. Le Guin's visionary science fiction has expanded boundaries and ambitions of the genre, bringing new literary aspiration to bold explorations of sexuality and gender, race and power, and the meaning of freedom. This volume, the first in a deluxe two-volume edition of her brilliant Hainish novels and stories, gathers five books, including her masterworks The Left Hand of Darkness (1969) and The Dispossessed (1974), and four stories, and features a new introduction by the author
Hainish novels & stories by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This second volume in a definitive two-volume edition gathers Le Guin's final two Hainish novels, The Word for World Is Forest, in which Earth enslaves another planet to strip its natural resources, and The Telling, the harrowing story of a society which has suppressed its own cultural heritage. Rounding out the volume are seven short stories and the story suite Five Ways to Forgiveness, published here in full for the first time. The endpapers feature a full-color chart of the known worlds of Hainish descent
Reading narrative fiction by Seymour Benjamin Chatman( Book )

5 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Narrative, identity, and academic community in higher education by Brian Attebery( )

5 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Section I Interrogating and Framing Reality: Identity and Cultural Perceptions -- 1 Old and New Technologies of Asynchronous Communication: Virtual Narratives and "Presence"--2 Onitsha Market Literature: Narrating Identity and Survival in a Colonial African City -- 3 Narrative Identities in India's Global Age -- 4 Narrative Text and Photographs: A Case for Ethnographic Research Poetry -- Section I Summary An Author Conversation -- Section II Narratives at the Intersection of the Public and Private -- 5 Finding Story in Unexpected Places: Branding and the Role of Narrative in the Study of Communication -- 6 The "Not Yet Pregnant": The Impact of Narratives on Infertility Identity and Reproductive Policy -- 7 Letter-Writing and the Eighteenth-Century Scientific Community: Constructing Narratives and Identity -- Section II Summary An Author Conversation -- Section III Performing Bodies, Creating Stories -- 8 Narratives of Pain -- 9 Narrative and the Performing Arts: A Symposium -- 10 Stories and Objects: Narrative and the Construction of Connective Links in an American Quilting Guild -- 11 The Currency of Stories: Anthropologists, Nawaals, and the Strange World of Academe -- Section III Summary An Author Conversation -- Conclusion: Narrative Diffusion -- List of Contributors -- Index
The complete Orsinia : Malafrena, Stories and Songs by Ursula K Le Guin( Book )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The worm Ouroboros, a romance by Eric Rücker Eddison( )

3 editions published between 2005 and 2012 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The lost classic masterpiece of magical realms, admired by Tolkien and the great prototype for The Lord of the Rings and modern fantasy fiction. On the far side of darkness lies a world where two mighty forces are making ready for a war of kingdom against kingdom, warrior against witch, and honour against treachery. It is a world that beckons Edward Lessingham and is totally at odds with his Edwardian background. Torn by greater passions than mere mortals can know, the adventure-loving lords of Demonland are pitted against the cruel enchantments of the witch-king Gorice XII. As swords cross with clash of steel, they begin their odyssey in glory and terror. E.R. Eddison's masterpiece stands as one of the great prototypes of modern fantasy fiction. The intricately woven themes of high adventure, sorcery and the conflict between good and evil transport the reader to epic worlds beyond imagination
Five ways to forgiveness by Ursula K Le Guin( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Here for the first time is the complete suite of five linked stories from Ursula K. Le Guin's acclaimed Hainish series, which tells the history of the Ekumen, the galactic confederation of human colonies founded by the planet Hain. First published in 1995 as Four Ways to Forgiveness, and now joined by a fifth story, Five Ways to Forgiveness focuses on the twin planets Werel and Yeowe, two worlds whose peoples, long known as "owners" and "assets," together face an uncertain future after civil war and revolution. In "Betrayals" a retired science teacher must make peace with her new neighbor, a disgraced revolutionary leader. In "Forgiveness Day," a female official from the Ekumen arrives to survey the situation on Werel and struggles against its rigidly patriarchal culture. Embedded within "A Man of the People," which describes the coming of age of Havzhiva, an Ekumen ambassador to Yeowe, is Le Guin's most sustained description of the Ur-planet Hain. "A Woman's Liberation" is the remarkable narrative of Rakam, born an asset on Werel, who must twice escape from slavery to freedom. Joined to them is "Old Music and the Slave Women," in which the charismatic Hainish embassy worker, who appears in two of the four original stories, returns for a tale of his own. Of this capstone tale Le Guin has written, "the character called Old Music began to tell me a fifth tale about the latter days of the civil war ... ''m glad to see it joined to the others at last."
Teacher's guide to accompany The Norton book of science fiction by Brian Attebery( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The Norton book of science fiction : North American science fiction, 1960-1990
Covers
Decoding gender in science fictionDecoding gender in science fictionReading narrative fiction
Alternative Names
Brian Attebery American writer

Brian Attebery Amerikaanse schrijver

Brian Attebery escriptor estatunidenc

Brian Attebery escritor estadounidense

Brian Attebery US-amerikanischer Schriftsteller

アトベリー, ブライアン

Languages
English (121)

Japanese (2)