WorldCat Identities

United States Army Corps of Engineers Ohio River Division

Overview
Works: 408 works in 540 publications in 1 language and 3,099 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History  Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Funder
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by United States
Water resources development in Tennessee( )

in English and held by 149 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water resources development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Indiana by United States( )

in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water resources development in Ohio( )

in English and held by 127 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water resources development in West Virginia( )

in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Projections of demand for waterborne transportation, Ohio River Basin, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2020, 2040( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Development of a numerical modeling capability for the computation of unsteady flow on the Ohio River and its major tributaries by Billy H Johnson( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Army Engineer Division, Ohio River, directs the operation of flood-control reservoirs as well as navigation locks and dams on the Ohio River and its tributaries. A one-dimensional mathematical model, FLOWSED, for predicting flow conditions on the Ohio River as a result of these activities is discussed. The basic numerical technique used in the model is an extension of work by Y.H. Chen on the upper Mississippi River. As the name implies, FLOWSED computes flow conditions as well as the sediment movement. The work reported herein emphasizes the flow computations with coefficients selected to make the sediment transport negligible. FLOWSED is an implicit finite difference model that provides the capability of modeling a system containing any number of tributaries. In addition, FLOWSED models the influence of locks and dams in the system as well as levee overtopping. The system modeled herein consists of the complete Ohio River from Pittsburgh, Pa., through its junction with the Mississippi River plus tributaries. Applications to various portions of the system using observed 1964, 1972, and 1976 flood data have been made and results are presented
National hydroelectric power resources study( Book )

in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Executive summary : projections of demand for waterborne transportation, Ohio River Basin 1980, 1990, 2000, 2020, 2040( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effect of loss of valley storage in the Cannelton Pool on Ohio River flood heights : final report by Billy H Johnson( Book )

3 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A mathematical model called SOCHMJ (Simulation of Open Channel Hydraulics in Multi-Junction Systems) was used to determine the effect of valley storage loss in the Cannelton Pool on flood heights along the Ohio River. Three levels of storage loss have been investigated. The first level was the complete removal of valley storage and was accomplished by assuming the placement of levees along the banks throughout the Cannelton Pool. The second level of storage loss was arrived at through placement of levees halfway from the bank to the maximum lateral encroachment of the 1945 flood throughout the Cannelton Pool. The third level consisted of assuming levees along the bank of the lower 58 miles of the Cannelton Pool. For each of the first two levels of storage loss, the calibrated values of Manning's n throughout the Cannelton Pool were first increased and then decreased by 20% to determine the effect on flood heights of varying the roughness coefficient. It is concluded that, before initiating major floodplain encroachment in the Cannelton Pool, additional studies with a much more elaborate treatment of the flows cutting across major river bends should be undertaken
Ohio River navigation : past-present-future by United States( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Commemorates the 50th anniversary of the completion of a 9-foot navigational channel on the Ohio River, which was accomplished with the opening of Lock and Dams 52 and 53 in 1929
Regional report : East Central Area Electric Reliability Council( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A mathematical model for unsteady-flow computations through the complete spectrum of flows on the lower Ohio River : final report by Billy H Johnson( Book )

3 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Army Engineer Division, Ohio River, is responsible for maintaining a navigable channel on the Ohio River during low-flow periods through the manipulation of the navigation dams on the river. In addition, during periods of flooding on the lower Ohio and lower Mississippi Rivers, the Ohio River Division directs the operation of Barkley and Kentucky Reservoirs on the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, respectively. Flood control regulations by these reservoirs are met by controlling, to some degree, the Ohio River stage at Cairo, Illinois. A mathematical model, SOCHMJ, for unsteady-flow solutions in multi-junction systems has been modified to include the effect of five navigation dams on the Ohio River in addition to the effect of operations at Barkley and Kentucky Reservoirs. For economical applications of the model to the system extending from Louisville, Kentucky, on the Ohio River, Livermore, Kentucky, on the Green River, Mt. Carmel, Indiana, on the Wabash River, Barkley Dam on the Cumberland River, Kentucky Dam on the Tennessee River, and Cape Girardeau on the upper Mississippi River to Caruthersville on the lower Mississippi River, the model has been modified to accept two time steps. A large time step applies to large branches, whereas a smaller time step is used to step computations forward on small branches within the large time step. An initial calibration of the model to 1975 data has been completed with encouraging results. Similar results from an application using 1976 data with no additional calibration of the model are also presented. (Author)
Water resources development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in West Virginia by United States( )

in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ohio River Basin comprehensive survey by Ohio River Basin Survey Coordinating Committee( Book )

4 editions published between 1968 and 1969 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water resources development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Kentucky( )

in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water resources development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Ohio by United States( )

in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ohio River Basin comprehensive survey by United States( Book )

4 editions published between 1964 and 1968 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final environmental impact statement : Ohio River navigation project operation and maintenance( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-controlled microwave drying of potentially difficult organic and inorganic soils by Paul A Gilbert( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report focuses on microwave system drying of potentially difficult soils and earth materials, some of which have a history of requiring special treatment for ordinary conventional oven water content determination. Materials tested are gravels, gravelly soils and earth-rock mixtures, dredged materials, fly ash, gypsum rich soils, calcite rich soils, organic clay, peat, and halloysite rich soils. Because specimen sizes too large to be practical for the microwave system would be required for representative samples in earth-rock mixtures, a procedure is outlined to determine water content based on knowledge of earth rock composition. Gravels, dredged materials, organic clay, fly ash, and calcite rich soils are demonstrated to dry satisfactorily in the system using the same procedure as for normal inorganic soils. The system was used to dry materials containing amounts of organic material varying from approx. 2-90%, and it was demonstrated that even though special software was required to dry highly organic soil (peat), the equipment dried these materials satisfactorily. The system failed to properly dry gypsum rich soils, and the development and documentation of this special software are given along with a version of the software for drying inorganic soils written for IBM compatible computers
User's manual for Computer-Controlled Microwave Oven System (CCMOS) for drying soil by Paul A Gilbert( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Water content and soil compaction need to be continuously monitored during the compaction of soil structures. Equipment to monitor field compaction in real time is needed because of the high production rate of modern construction equipment. A microwave drying system based on computer control of microwave energy application was developed at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station for determining water content rapidly and accurately. This document is a user's manual for that microwave drying system and describes the equipment, its use, its requirements, and safety precautions that should be observed during operation
 
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English (67)