WorldCat Identities

United States Agency for International Development Office of Women in Development

Overview
Works: 233 works in 426 publications in 1 language and 8,456 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about United States
 
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Most widely held works by United States
Women of the world : Near East and North Africa by Mary Chamie( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 618 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women of the world : Latin America and the Caribbean by Elsa Chaney( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 390 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women of the world : a chartbook for developing regions by Ellen Jamison( Book )

4 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 387 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women of the world : Sub-Saharan Africa by Jeanne S Newman( Book )

4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 363 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The second in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 40 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Beginning with an overview of population characteristics in the region, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text, but also in narrative form, offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of the data assembled on each variable. Findings show that except in Nigeria, the populations of Sub-Saharan African countries are not large and rural densities are not usually high. However, the population is growing rapidly, at about three percent per year. The proportion of women in the working ages is lower in the urban and higher in the rural areas than is that of men. There appear to be subregional differences in female literacy: rates tend to be higher in the Eastern and Southern regions than in West Africa, and the female disadvantage relative to males is smaller. Moreover, male labor force participation is uniformly high in the region, while female participation is lower and highly variable. Plural marriage is common in many countries of the region; in 10 of the 12 countries with data on polygamy, one-fifth to one-third of the married men had two or more wives. Appendices contain references, tables, and information on population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence. (LH)
Women of the world : Asia and the Pacific by Nasra M Shah( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 353 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The fourth in a series of five handbooks designed to present and analyze statistical data on women in various regions of the world, this handbook focuses on women in 14 countries of Asia and the Pacific. Beginning with an overview of population distribution and changes in the region, the analysis continues with a description of women's literacy and education, their labor force participation, their marital status and living arrangements, their fertility, and their mortality. Information is presented not only in tables, charts, and text but also in narrative forms offering a critique on concepts, availability, and quality of the data assembled on each variable. Findings show that the Asian region contains two of the world's largest countries, Mainland China and India, which together are the home of 37 percent of the earth's inhabitants. In contrast, the Pacific island nations are relatively small. Compared to other parts of the developing world, the youth (under age 15) dependency burden in Asia as a whole is low, due largely to rapidly declining family size in East Asia and Mainland China. In all countries, men outpace women in the ability to read and write, although literacy is considerably higher among younger women. In addition, there are large female/male differences in rates of economic activity in both rural and urban areas, and marriage continues to be a prime determinant of women's status throughout much of Asia. Appendices contain references; sources of data; tables; information on population by age, sex, and rural/urban residence; and abbreviations. (Lh)
Illustrative statistics on women in selected developing countries by Thomas Lorimer( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 342 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in Poland by Victoria Averil Velkoff( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Keeping women out : a structural analysis of women's employment in developing countries by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in migration : a third world focus by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

10 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 167 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Spurred in part by the apparent contradiction between recent data on the magnitude of autonomous female migration and the lack of acknowledgment of that data in recent literature, a 1979 study attempted to define women migrants in 46 Third World Countries in terms of age, marital status, socioeconomic status, factors motivating migration, and effects of migration. Because data from publications, national censuses, and studies frequently did not focus on autonomous female migrants, researchers constructed a sex differential migration index. While many regional differences existed in the areas studied (Africa, Asia, Central America, the Middle East, South America), female outmigration generally dominated only among migrants over age 50. Most female migrants were adolescent, in their early twenties, or over 50. Most were single and had less education than male migrants. A growing percentage migrated, often in step-wise fashion, for economic reasons. Having migrated to urban areas, many female migrants found themselves in low-paying, low status jobs. Researchers noted increased family responsibilities for female migrants and for rural wives of male migrants, and the weakening effect of serious economic dimensions of women's migration and on autonomous female migration. (SB)
The productivity of women in developing countries : measurement issues and recommendations by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

6 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 165 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Limits to productivity : improving women's access to technology and credit by Ilsa Schumacher( Book )

7 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 161 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While there is significant variation in women's economic participation rates across cultures and situations in Third World countries, the common features in work patterns of poor women are striking. Segmented labor markets predominate throughout the developing world and restrict the demand for female labor to subsistence activities or to jobs in sectors of the market economy with low pay and status, limited tenure, and few chances for upward mobility. Low income women are most often engaged in household and market work, which is time consuming, inefficient, and intermittent; and their activities use few modern tools and skills and entail little or no capital investment. Poor working women, more than men, lack the benefits of productive resources, which increase productivity and economic returns to labor. This occurs because of women's place in the structure of technology and credit use--women are not in a position to have access to these productive resources in their modern forms. Women do not demand modern technology and credit because of several factors: lack of information concerning the availability of credit or technology; limited opportunity for profitable investments; cultural constraints that restrict women in interacting with male bank officials or extension agents; and lastly, women's lack of control over other economic resources, such as land or other property, which realistically prevents them from demanding their resources. Policy changes need to be made to improve women's access to technology and credit in the Third World--both through general development of resources and through specific strategies to help women. (Such strategies are suggested in this report.) (Kc)
Jobs for women in rural industry and services by Ruth Dixon-Mueller( Book )

5 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 157 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The comparative functionality of formal and non-formal education for women : final report by Vivian Lowery Derryck( Book )

7 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 157 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This final report describes a five-phase study to ascertain whether formal or non-formal education has the greater functionality to accelerate women's integration into development activities. Part 1 (two chapters), introduction and background, defines the problem, sets parameters of the study, and provides definitions of education terms. Part 2 (three chapters) examines the history of United States education and schooling in colonial Africa to gain historic perspective. Focus is on female edocation in nineteenth-century America, the rise of the common school, and colonial education in Africa. Part 3 (two chapters) overviews formal and nonformal education and discusses the status of women and education. Part 4 (four chapters) examines three types of education functionality (social, economic, and demographic) and analyzes each for formal and non-formal education. It concludes with a summary of functionalities and dysfunctionalities. Part 5 (three chapters) explores constraints of the political environment and speculates about possible outcomes of a major investment in female education. Again, the focus is sub-Saharan Africa. Part 6 (four chapters) offers recommendations for actions to attack the problem of female under-education. The final part summarizes major study findings and concludes with observations on the current relationship of education and women in development efforts. (YLB)
Bringing women in : towards a new direction in occupational skills training for women by International Center for Research on Women( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 153 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women's organizations in rural development by Kathleen A Staudt( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 152 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in forestry for local community development : a programming guide by Marilyn W Hoskins( Book )

4 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 152 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women in international migration : issues inn development planning by Elsa Chaney( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 148 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women and energy : program implications by Irene Tinker( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 148 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Successful rural water supply projects and the concerns of women by Paula Roark( Book )

4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women, migration and the decline of smallholder agriculture : paper presented to the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development, Washington, D.C. by Elsa Chaney( Book )

5 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

If there are cash remittances, the family left behind may shift production and consumption patterns. If a dependency on remittances develops, there may be a loss of self-sufficiency in the production of food and other necessities. Even if migrants return, there may be a reluctance to take up agriculture again. This paper argues that policies designed to increase food for the poor cannot succeed unless they take into account the problems faced by the women left behind as food producers
 
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Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.43 for Women of t ... to 1.00 for Bibliograp ...)

Alternative Names
AID/WID

G/WID

Office of Women in Development United States, Agency for International Development

United States. Agency for International Development. Bureau for Global Programs, Field Support, and Research. Office of Women in Development

United States. Agency for International Development. Women in Development Office

United States Office of Women in Development

United States Women in Development Office

WID

Women in Development Office of USAID

Languages
English (106)