WorldCat Identities

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 4,363 works in 6,917 publications in 2 languages and 74,081 library holdings
Genres: Maps  Conference papers and proceedings  Bibliography‡vCatalogs  Handbooks and manuals  Bibliography 
Roles: Originator, Other, Publisher
Classifications: GB2401, 912.158197987
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Electromagnetic induction sounding of sea ice thickness by Austin Kovacs( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 283 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geobotanical atlas of the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Manual of practice for an effective anti-icing program : a guide for highway winter maintenance personnel( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research : 10-15 July 1994, San Diego, California USA by International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Object-GAWSER : object-oriented Guelph all-weather storm-event runoff model : phase I, training manual : application of object-oriented simulation to hydrologic modeling by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hydrologic models are currently used to understand the economic and ecological imacts of hydrologic processes. A new hydrologic model entitled Object-GAWSER was designed using an object-oriented platform to provide new insights into watershed hydrology. Object-GAWSER is a temperature index model that simulates upland watershed hydrology. Object-GAWSER is different from other hydrologic models in that each one of its components can be easily studied to understand its sensitivity to various inputs. First, this report will show how Object-GAWSER can be used to simulate the hydrologic behavior of forested, agricultural, and suburban watersheds. Second, this report will describe how Object-GAWSER was designed
Ice jam flooding and mitigation : Lower Platte River Basin, Nebraska by Kathleen D White( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the results of the Corps of Engineers' Section 22 study of ice jam flooding in the Lower Platte River basin. The purpose of the study was to gather and analyze historical data relating to ice jams, with the intent of developing guidance that can be used to alleviate ice jam flooding at seven sites within the study area. Ice event and related information is summarized for each site. Ice event characteristics for the study area are identified and analyzed. A model for predicting the occurrence of ice jams or other ice events within the study area was developed based on data for the Platte River at North Bend, Nebraska. The model provides the minimum discharge associated with ice events for a given date, assuming a threshold value of accumulated freezing degree-days has been reached. A data collection program for future field observations was developed and placed in operation during the winter of 1993-94. General information on ice jam mitigation measures, as well as specific information on such operations as dusting and blasting, is provided. Specific recommendations include increased monitoring of ice conditions, installation of ice motion detectors and water stage recorders, and further study of nonstructural and structural mitigation measures. The use of dusting and blasting as mitigation measures is also presented. The study was divided into six phases. Phase 1 involved collection of historical information from all available data sources, published and oral. Site visits were made to each identified site. Phase 2 entailed analysis and assessment of the collected hydrological, hydraulical, meteorological and ice data
Sea ice by Austin Kovacs( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dusting river ice with leaf mulch to aid in ice deterioration by Robert B Haehnel( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In an effort to find a low cost means of reducing ice jams on small rivers in New England, dusting with organic matter was field tested during the spring of 1993 and 1994. Test squares on a pond located at CRREL in Hanover, New Hampshire, were dusted with several materials to evaluate their effectiveness in accelerating snow melting and ice deterioration. Leaf mulch was included in the materials tested because, unlike other materials used in the past to weaken ice (e.g., fly ash or coal slag), leaves are naturally found in rivers and should not adversely affect aquatic organisms when applied in small quantities. It was found from these tests that the leaves perform about the same as the traditionally used dusting materials. To transfer what was learned at the pond tests to a field application, two rivers in Vermont, with a known history of ice jams, were dusted using leaf mulch during the spring of 1994. Since these sites were located on narrow rivers that wind through highly populated areas, aerial dusting was not possible. For these sites we used a hydroseeder to spread the leaves on the ice. Application at leaf mulch with a hydroseeder was found to be an efficient method of putting the leaves on the ice. After the rivers were dusted we had a heavy snowfall, and were not able to determine the effectiveness of the leaf mulch in melting the ice. Observations suggest, however, that the leaf mulch helped melt the overlying snow
Freeze-thaw processes and soil chemistry by Giles M Marion( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This review broadly examines the interactions between freeze-thaw processes and soil chemistry, focusing on (1) the effect of solutes on physical properties such as freezing-point depression, unfrozen water and frost heaving, (2) the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and low temperatures on soil chemistry, and (3) modeling of freeze-thaw processes and chemistry. The presence of solutes causes a freezing-point depression, which increases the amount of unfrozen water in soils. Liquid films on soil particles provide the dominant route for the flow of water and associated solutes in frozen soils. In general, salts reduce the hydraulic conductivity and water flow to the freezing front, which reduces frost heaving. Solute exclusion during freezing leads to supersaturated solutions, which promotes the precipitation of secondary minerals in soils. At the watershed level, ionic concentrations in early melt- waters are often 2-9 times higher than snowpack concentrations. Temperature is the dominant factor controlling decomposition rates, with minimal detectable rates occurring at temperatures as low as -10 deg C; both bacteria and fungi are physiologically active at subzero temperatures. Extracellular enzymes are active in soils at temperatures as low as -20 deg C; this activity is thought to occur in unfrozen water on surfaces of soil particles. Nitrogen mineralization is reported at temperatures as low as 1 deg C and is promoted by freeze-thaw cycles. jg
Effects of ice boom geometry on ice capture efficiency by Gordon E Gooch( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An ice boom's geometry is critical to the collectlon and retention of ice in small, fast-moving streams and rivers. Ice booms are designed to quickly form a solid ice cover much earlier than the ice cover would form naturally. Once formed, the ice cover insulates the river, eliminating the production of frazil ice locally. Frazil leads to thick ice deposits, which reduce the river's available flow area and contribute to midwinter and spring flooding. Model experiments, conducted at the Ice Engineering Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, have varied the ice boom geometry to speed up the process of ice cover formation. Model simulations have used floating plastic beads to simulate real ice particles to determine what ice boom design works best. Under controlled laboratory conditions, boom geometry clearly affects the boom's ability to captured more beads. Comparison of field and laboratory tests indicates similar results
Ice action on riprap : small-scale tests by D. S Sodhi( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We conducted 35 small-scale experiments to assess the damage on riprap-covered banks by ice shoving. A review of literature on this subject revealed very litte experience or guidance available for the design of riprap in the cold regions, where presence of moving ice can cause substantial damage too riprapped bank. During the experimental program, we changed the slope of the model riprap bank, the size and the mix of rocks, and the thickness of model ice sheets. Results of these tests are presented in terms of measured horizontal and vertical forces, outcome of interaction as pileup or ride-up events, and damage to the model riprap bank. From the observations made during the tests, the damage to the riprap appears to take place during pileup events, because the incoming ice sheet is forced to go between the riprap and the piled-up ice, bringing with it rocks from the bottom to the surface of an ice pile. To sustain no damage to the riprapped protective layer, maximum rock size (D100) should be twice the ice thickness for shallow slopes and about three times the ice thickness for steeper slopes
Electromechanical phenomena in ice by Victor F Petrenko( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The atmospheric boundary layer over polar marine surfaces by Edgar L Andreas( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roof blisters : cause and cure by C. J Korhonen( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Blisters are a major problem of built-up roof membranes. They are caused by voids built into the roof during construction. They develop into the characteristic dome-shaped humps by a breathing action driven by thermal cycling. A small pressure relief vent was patented by CRREL as a cost-effective way to repair blisters. Though these vents cannot prevent blisters from forming, they can lengthen a roof's service life by repairing the blisters before they break. Two demonstration projects were conducted to transfer the blister vent technology to the military community. Most participants in the demonstration projects found the vent easy to use and that it performed as designed. The main objection to the vent was its price. (MM)
Ice accretion in freezing rain by Kathleen F Jones( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice jam flooding on the Missouri River near Williston, North Dakota by James L Wuebben( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This investigation focused on ice related flooding along the Missouri River, just below the confluence with the Yellowstone River near Williston, North Dakota. This area is at the upper end of Lake Sakakawea. With the closure of Garrison Dam in 1953, Lake Sakakawea began filling, reaching operational levels in 1965. Changes in the hydraulics, sedimentation and ice regime of the Missouri River caused by the impoundment have led to an increase in the potential for overbank flooding. This report describes the ice regime assessment that was conducted to characterize ice jam flooding, the development of a method to predict the potential for ice jam occurrence and severity, and potential flood mitigation measures
USA CRREL technical publications by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

7 editions published between 1970 and 1976 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstracts from the International Conference on Snow Hydrology : the integration of physical, chemical, and biological systems by Chemical, and Biological Systems International Conference on Snow Hydrology: the Integration of Physical( Book )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of temperature on germination of eleven Festuca cultivars by A. J Palazzo( Book )

4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many studies have shown that water potential at planting affects the germination rate and final germination of Festuca cultivars. Limited information is available about the extent of variability in temperature-dependence of germination among different Festuca cultivars. Our objective was to study germination at five temperatures for a wide range of Festuca cultivars. Festuca seeds were screened for germination during 28 days in polyethylene growth pouches held at constant temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, or 300C. The germination percentage significantly (p <0.05) increased as the temperature increased from 10 to 150C, when averaged across the cultivars, and decreased thereafter. The cultivar "Clemfine" tall fescue (Festuca arundinacen Schreb.) had the greatest germination percentage, and "Arctared" red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) had the least when averaged across the five temperatures. Conversely, the average time to germination (Atg) was greatest at 100C and least at 300C. Reaching a germination level of 80% or more of the seeds required 14 days at 100C, 9 d at 150C, 8 d at 200C, and 7 d at 25 or 300C. Base temperatures required for germination of Festuca species were 3.20C for rapid germinators, 3.6 to 60C for medium germinators, and 4 to 60C for poor germinators. Heat units (growing degree-days>100C) calculated for the rapid germinators were 1290C-d, 120 to 1400C-d for medium germinators, and 135 to 1910C-d for the poor germinators. Germination decreased as heat units were increased. The Atg and heat unit regressions explained
Improved native grasses and establishment methods for use on military training lands by A. J Palazzo( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objective of this project was to develop more wear-resistant plants and evaluate the relationships between military training and plant injury, regrowth, and wear-resistance. Through plant breeding, we were able to improve traits related to resiliency and establishment in introduced and native species of rangeland grasses. We selected for early spring growth, increased seedling vigor, improved tiller and rhizome development after disturbance, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Our improved plant materials will be ecologically compatible at the military sites because they were developed from collections of species native to or previously seeded at these sites. We made advances in relating molecular markers to plant characteristics and in using DNA fingerprinting techniques to characterize genetic diversity. We used markers to identify species and plants that can grow better at low temperatures. We now have the tools to assess the genetic differences and similarities in commercial and natural seed sources, enabling land managers to select seed sources that will ensure genetic compatibility with existing populations. Our tank traffic studies showed that naturalized, introduced species are more tolerant and recover more rapidly under repeated tracking than native plants. However, two improved native species, western wheatgrass and Snake River wheatgrass, showed promise as stabilization species because of their ability to colonize damaged areas. Our studies on what we call "ecological bridges" confirm that we can select seed mixtures that will establish more rapidly than all-native mixes and will ultimately lead to healthy and persistent stands of native plants. The species in the seed mixtures and the equipment needed are readily available, and the seeding can be done in one application, thus saving money. Our improved germplasm will make these seeding mixes even more desirable
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityU.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

C.R.R.E.L.

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Cold Regions Research &#x26; Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover N.H.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

CRREL

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory)

CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

Hanover (N.H.). U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

K.R.R.E.L.

KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii S.Sh.A. po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii SShA po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ po izuchenii︠u︡ inzhenernykh problem kholodnykh regionov (U.S.)

SIPRE (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Jusqu'en 1961)

U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories

U.S.Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

U.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, N.H.

United States. Army. Cold Regions Research and Engineerng Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research &#x26; Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Corps of enginneers. Engineer research and development center. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

US Army Corps of enginneers. Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

USACE. ERDC. CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

USACRREL

Languages
English (103)

Russian (2)