WorldCat Identities

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 3,737 works in 5,868 publications in 2 languages and 66,017 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Maps  Bibliography‡vCatalogs  Handbooks, manuals, etc  Classification  Bibliography 
Roles: Originator
Classifications: GB2401, 912.158197987
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Publications about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.) Publications about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Publications by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.) Publications by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Most widely held works about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Geobotanical atlas of the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.) ( )
3 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 247 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Effects of ice boom geometry on ice capture efficiency by Gordon E Gooch ( Book )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 247 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An ice boom's geometry is critical to the collectlon and retention of ice in small, fast-moving streams and rivers. Ice booms are designed to quickly form a solid ice cover much earlier than the ice cover would form naturally. Once formed, the ice cover insulates the river, eliminating the production of frazil ice locally. Frazil leads to thick ice deposits, which reduce the river's available flow area and contribute to midwinter and spring flooding. Model experiments, conducted at the Ice Engineering Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, have varied the ice boom geometry to speed up the process of ice cover formation. Model simulations have used floating plastic beads to simulate real ice particles to determine what ice boom design works best. Under controlled laboratory conditions, boom geometry clearly affects the boom's ability to captured more beads. Comparison of field and laboratory tests indicates similar results
Electromechanical phenomena in ice by Victor F Petrenko ( )
3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Electromagnetic induction sounding of sea ice thickness by Ábrahám Kovács ( Book )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Field results from a man-portable electromagnetic induction sounding instrument, with special plug-in data processing modules for the remote measurement of sea ice thickness, are discussed. The field trials indicate that the instrument was capable of estimating undeformed sea ice thickness, with a snow cover, generally within about 5% of the drill hole measured thicknesses from about 1.25 to 4.5 m. No ice under 1.25 m was sounded in this study. Instrument thickness determinations of multiyear sea ice over about 4.5 m thick showed larger deviation from the drill hole snow and ice thickness measurement. It is proposed that the undulating multiyear sea ice relief is the major cause of the EM deviation. (Author)
Ice action on riprap small-scale tests by D. S Sodhi ( )
3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We conducted 35 small-scale experiments to assess the damage on riprap-covered banks by ice shoving. A review of literature on this subject revealed very litte experience or guidance available for the design of riprap in the cold regions, where presence of moving ice can cause substantial damage too riprapped bank. During the experimental program, we changed the slope of the model riprap bank, the size and the mix of rocks, and the thickness of model ice sheets. Results of these tests are presented in terms of measured horizontal and vertical forces, outcome of interaction as pileup or ride-up events, and damage to the model riprap bank. From the observations made during the tests, the damage to the riprap appears to take place during pileup events, because the incoming ice sheet is forced to go between the riprap and the piled-up ice, bringing with it rocks from the bottom to the surface of an ice pile. To sustain no damage to the riprapped protective layer, maximum rock size (D100) should be twice the ice thickness for shallow slopes and about three times the ice thickness for steeper slopes
The atmospheric boundary layer over polar marine surfaces by Edgar L Andreas ( )
5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over polar marine surfaces is, in ways, simpler and, in other ways, more complex than ABLs in other environments. It is simpler because topographic effects are rarely a concern, the surface is fairly homogeneous, and roughness lengths over sea ice and the ocean are much smaller than they are over land. It is complex because the stratification is usually stable, and stable AELs have not yielded to quantification as readily as convective AELs have. This report reviews some of these characteristics of ABLs over polar marine surfaces. The ABL, by definition, is the turbulent layer between the Earth's surface and the (generally) nonturbulent free atmosphere. Hence, the emphasis is on turbulence processes-in particular, the turbulent transfer of momentum and sensible and latent heat over sea ice. As such, this report reviews both the theoretical and observational bases for our understanding of the mean structure of the AEL. Understanding this structure then allows predicting the turbulent surface fluxes of momentum and sensible and latent heat
Roof blisters cause and cure by C. J Korhonen ( )
2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Blisters are a major problem of built-up roof membranes. They are caused by voids built into the roof during construction. They develop into the characteristic dome-shaped humps by a breathing action driven by thermal cycling. A small pressure relief vent was patented by CRREL as a cost-effective way to repair blisters. Though these vents cannot prevent blisters from forming, they can lengthen a roof's service life by repairing the blisters before they break. Two demonstration projects were conducted to transfer the blister vent technology to the military community. Most participants in the demonstration projects found the vent easy to use and that it performed as designed. The main objection to the vent was its price. (MM)
Ice accretion in freezing rain by Kathleen F Jones ( )
2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sampling trace-level organics with polymeric tubings : dynamic studies by L. V Parker ( Book )
4 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 216 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study is the second phase of a two-year effort to determine the effects that sampling tubings have on organic analyte concentrations. In the first year, 20 different tubings were compared, under static conditions, with respect to sorption of organic contaminants and leaching of organic constituents. In this study, we examined what occurs under dynamic conditions when TCE-contaminated water is pumped through several different types of polymeric tubings. Sorption of organic solutes, leaching of organic constituents, and desorption of sorbed organic contaminants were all examined. Five tubings were selected for this study: a rigid fluoropolymer, a flexible fluoropolymer, low-density polyethylene (LDPE), and two plasticized polypropylene tubings. These materials were selected because our static studies had shown that these tubings leached little or no organic constituents (as determined by HPLC analyses with an ultraviolet UV detector) and ranged from being the least sorptive tubings tested to among the most highly sorptive. The effects of tubing length and flow rate were examined. Results from these studies indicate that if water is pumped through tubing at a slow flow rate (100 mL/min), fluoropolymers should be used to prevent extensive losses of TCE and more sorptive analytes, especially if the tubing is 50 ft or longer. If a faster flow rate (1 L/min) is used, it appears that LDPE tubing can be used to sample TCE and other less sorptive analytes, although time for equilibration (2% hr) should be allowed to reduce losses in the deepest wells
Ice jam flooding on the Missouri River near Williston, North Dakota by James L Wuebben ( )
3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This investigation focused on ice related flooding along the Missouri River, just below the confluence with the Yellowstone River near Williston, North Dakota. This area is at the upper end of Lake Sakakawea. With the closure of Garrison Dam in 1953, Lake Sakakawea began filling, reaching operational levels in 1965. Changes in the hydraulics, sedimentation and ice regime of the Missouri River caused by the impoundment have led to an increase in the potential for overbank flooding. This report describes the ice regime assessment that was conducted to characterize ice jam flooding, the development of a method to predict the potential for ice jam occurrence and severity, and potential flood mitigation measures
Proceedings of the International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research 10-15 July 1994, San Diego, California USA by International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research ( Book )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Snow removal and ice control research : proceedings of the second international symposium, held May 15-19, 1978, at Hanover, New Hampshire, and sponsored by the Transportation Research Board, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Transportation by International Symposium on Snow Removal and Ice Control Research ( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report contains 56 conference papers pertaining to snow removal and ice control research including Canadian research and equipment. Several of the papers are concerned with deicing salts--their effectiveness, their impact on the environment, and possible alternatives to them. Alternative methods of deicing discussed herein include: heating of bridge decks, increasing coefficient of friction between tires and pavement surfaces, use of high intensity lights, and advent of less corrosive chemicals. There are also several papers that address the problem of snow and ice accretion on power wires, guideway systems, sign boards, and etc. There is considerable attention given to development of computer programs and models for predicting scope of snow and ice control operations and for evaluating their effectiveness. Also, several papers discuss new developments in snow removal equipment and the cost of operation and maintenance
Improved native grasses and establishment methods for use on military training lands by A. J Palazzo ( )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The objective of this project was to develop more wear-resistant plants and evaluate the relationships between military training and plant injury, regrowth, and wear-resistance. Through plant breeding, we were able to improve traits related to resiliency and establishment in introduced and native species of rangeland grasses. We selected for early spring growth, increased seedling vigor, improved tiller and rhizome development after disturbance, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Our improved plant materials will be ecologically compatible at the military sites because they were developed from collections of species native to or previously seeded at these sites. We made advances in relating molecular markers to plant characteristics and in using DNA fingerprinting techniques to characterize genetic diversity. We used markers to identify species and plants that can grow better at low temperatures. We now have the tools to assess the genetic differences and similarities in commercial and natural seed sources, enabling land managers to select seed sources that will ensure genetic compatibility with existing populations. Our tank traffic studies showed that naturalized, introduced species are more tolerant and recover more rapidly under repeated tracking than native plants. However, two improved native species, western wheatgrass and Snake River wheatgrass, showed promise as stabilization species because of their ability to colonize damaged areas. Our studies on what we call "ecological bridges" confirm that we can select seed mixtures that will establish more rapidly than all-native mixes and will ultimately lead to healthy and persistent stands of native plants. The species in the seed mixtures and the equipment needed are readily available, and the seeding can be done in one application, thus saving money. Our improved germplasm will make these seeding mixes even more desirable
Roadway design in seasonal frost areas by National Research Council (U.S.) ( Book )
2 editions published between 1974 and 1975 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Decontaminating groundwater sampling devices by L. V Parker ( )
4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 153 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In these studies, the efficiency of various decontamination protocols was tested by using small pieces of materials commonly used in groundwater sampling devices. Three types of materials that ranged in their ability to sorb organic solutes were tested: stainless steel, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). These test pieces were exposed to two aqueous test solutions: one solution contained three volatile organic compounds and one nitroaromatic compound, and the other solution contained four pesticides of varying hydrophobicity. Also, three types of polymeric tubing were exposed to pesticide solutions. Generally, contact times for sorption and desorption were 10 minutes and 24 hours. The test results indicate that, generally, organic contaminants are removed from these materials simply by washing with a hot detergent solution and rinsing with hot water. The exceptions were low-density polyethylene tubing that was exposed to a pesticide test solution for 24 hours and allowed to desorb for 24 hours, and PTFE that was exposed to volatile organics for 24 hours. For these, a hot detergent water wash and rinse followed by oven drying at -105 deg C was the most effective treatment. With this treatment, VOCs were not detected desorbing from the PTFE, and pesticide contamination desorbing from LDPE was substantially reduced. Solvent rinsing did not improve removal of VOCs and only marginally improved removal of pesticides from LDPE
Frost susceptibility of soil review of index tests by Edwin J Chamberlain ( Book )
6 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Methods of determining the frost susceptibility of soils are identified and presented in this report. More than one hundred criteria were found, the most common based on particle size characteristics. These particle size criteria are frequently augmented by information such as grain size distribution, uniformity coefficients and Atterberg limits. Information on permeability, mineralogy and soil classification has also been used. More complex methods requiring pore size distribution, moisture-tension, hydraulic-conductivity, heave-stress, and frost-heave tests have also been proposed. However, none has proven to be the universal test for determining the frost susceptibility of soils. Based on this survey, four methods are proposed for further study. They are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Frost Susceptibility Classification System, the moisture-tension hydraulic-conductivity test, a new frost-heave test, and the CBR-after-thaw test
Manual of practice for an effective anti-icing program : a guide for highway winter maintenance personnel ( Book )
2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 144 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstracts from the International Conference on Snow Hydrology the integration of physical, chemical, and biological systems by International Conference on Snow Hydrology ( )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 144 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Ground freezing effects on soil erosion of army training lands by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.) ( )
4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 141 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Military maneuvers damage vegetation and compact and rut soils on training lands, thereby increasing the likelihood of hillslope runoff and soil erosion. Soil Freeze-Thaw (FT) processes can change the hydraulic geometry and roughness of vehicular ruts and reduce soil compaction, which often partially restores the water infiltration rate that existed before compaction. The efficiency of these FT-induced 'repairs' depends on soil water content and FT intensity. Initial tests showed that: (1) an experimental soil bin designed and constructed for rut experiments allows acceptable simulation of field soil FT, and (2) the hydraulic geometry of a rectangular rill in a fine silt soil with an initial volumetric water content of 36% changes dramatically due to rill sideslope slumping during thaw. Future experiments will compare differences in the response of natural rills and vehicular ruts to FT-induced soil failure, and investigate the effects of FT on soil erodibility and the influences of snow cover on soil erosion processes in the spring
Freeze-thaw processes and soil chemistry by Giles M Marion ( Book )
2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identity U.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

C.R.R.E.L.
Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover N.H.)
Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
CRREL
CRREL Abkuerzung
CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory)
CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)
K.R.R.E.L.
KRREL
Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii S.Sh.A. po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL
Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii SShA po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL
Laboratorii︠a︡ po izuchenii︠u︡ inzhenernykh problem kholodnykh regionov (U.S.)
SIPRE (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)
Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Jusqu'en 1961)
U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories
U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
United States. Army. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
United States. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, N.H.
United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory
United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
United States Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory
United States Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
United States Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
United States. U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
US Army Corps of enginneers. Engineer research and development center. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)
US Army Corps of enginneers. Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)
USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
USACE. ERDC. CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)
USACRREL
Languages
English (95)
Russian (2)