WorldCat Identities

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 4,778 works in 7,210 publications in 2 languages and 71,823 library holdings
Genres: Maps  Bibliography‡vCatalogs  Conference papers and proceedings  Bibliography  Abstracts  History 
Roles: Originator, Other, Publisher
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Electromagnetic induction sounding of sea ice thickness by Austin Kovacs( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 292 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geobotanical atlas of the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Object-GAWSER : object-oriented Guelph all-weather storm-event runoff model : phase I, training manual : application of object-oriented simulation to hydrologic modeling by John A Hinckley( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research : 10-15 July 1994, San Diego, California USA by International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ground freezing effects on soil erosion of army training lands by Lawrence W Gatto( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Military maneuvers damage vegetation and compact and rut soils on training lands, thereby increasing the likelihood of hillslope runoff and soil erosion. Soil Freeze-Thaw (FT) processes can change the hydraulic geometry and roughness of vehicular ruts and reduce soil compaction, which often partially restores the water infiltration rate that existed before compaction. The efficiency of these FT-induced 'repairs' depends on soil water content and FT intensity. Initial tests showed that: (1) an experimental soil bin designed and constructed for rut experiments allows acceptable simulation of field soil FT, and (2) the hydraulic geometry of a rectangular rill in a fine silt soil with an initial volumetric water content of 36% changes dramatically due to rill sideslope slumping during thaw. Future experiments will compare differences in the response of natural rills and vehicular ruts to FT-induced soil failure, and investigate the effects of FT on soil erodibility and the influences of snow cover on soil erosion processes in the spring
Automation opportunities at Corps of Engineers locks and dams by Kevin L Carey( )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Winter tests of artillery firing into Eagle River Flats, Fort Richardson, Alaska by Charles M Collins( )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 179 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of ice boom geometry on ice capture efficiency by Gordon E Gooch( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice action on riprap : small-scale tests by D. S Sodhi( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Electromechanical phenomena in ice by Victor F Petrenko( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The atmospheric boundary layer over polar marine surfaces by Edgar L Andreas( Book )

6 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over polar marine surfaces is, in ways, simpler and, in other ways, more complex than ABLs in other environments. It is simpler because topographic effects are rarely a concern, the surface is fairly homogeneous, and roughness lengths over sea ice and the ocean are much smaller than they are over land. It is complex because the stratification is usually stable, and stable AELs have not yielded to quantification as readily as convective AELs have. This report reviews some of these characteristics of ABLs over polar marine surfaces. The ABL, by definition, is the turbulent layer between the Earth's surface and the (generally) nonturbulent free atmosphere. Hence, the emphasis is on turbulence processes-in particular, the turbulent transfer of momentum and sensible and latent heat over sea ice. As such, this report reviews both the theoretical and observational bases for our understanding of the mean structure of the AEL. Understanding this structure then allows predicting the turbulent surface fluxes of momentum and sensible and latent heat
Roof blisters : cause and cure by C. J Korhonen( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Blisters are a major problem of built-up roof membranes. They are caused by voids built into the roof during construction. They develop into the characteristic dome-shaped humps by a breathing action driven by thermal cycling. A small pressure relief vent was patented by CRREL as a cost-effective way to repair blisters. Though these vents cannot prevent blisters from forming, they can lengthen a roof's service life by repairing the blisters before they break. Two demonstration projects were conducted to transfer the blister vent technology to the military community. Most participants in the demonstration projects found the vent easy to use and that it performed as designed. The main objection to the vent was its price. (MM)
Ice accretion in freezing rain by Kathleen F Jones( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice jam flooding on the Missouri River near Williston, North Dakota by James L Wuebben( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstracts from the International Conference on Snow Hydrology : the integration of physical, chemical, and biological systems by International Conference on Snow Hydrology( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

USA CRREL technical publications by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice strength as a function of hydrostatic pressure and temperature by Anatoly M Fish( Book )

4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of temperature on germination of eleven Festuca cultivars by A. J Palazzo( Book )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many studies have shown that water potential at planting affects the germination rate and final germination of Festuca cultivars. Limited information is available about the extent of variability in temperature-dependence of germination among different Festuca cultivars. Our objective was to study germination at five temperatures for a wide range of Festuca cultivars. Festuca seeds were screened for germination during 28 days in polyethylene growth pouches held at constant temperatures of 10, 15, 20, 25, or 300C. The germination percentage significantly (p <0.05) increased as the temperature increased from 10 to 150C, when averaged across the cultivars, and decreased thereafter. The cultivar "Clemfine" tall fescue (Festuca arundinacen Schreb.) had the greatest germination percentage, and "Arctared" red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) had the least when averaged across the five temperatures. Conversely, the average time to germination (Atg) was greatest at 100C and least at 300C. Reaching a germination level of 80% or more of the seeds required 14 days at 100C, 9 d at 150C, 8 d at 200C, and 7 d at 25 or 300C. Base temperatures required for germination of Festuca species were 3.20C for rapid germinators, 3.6 to 60C for medium germinators, and 4 to 60C for poor germinators. Heat units (growing degree-days>100C) calculated for the rapid germinators were 1290C-d, 120 to 1400C-d for medium germinators, and 135 to 1910C-d for the poor germinators. Germination decreased as heat units were increased. The Atg and heat unit regressions explained
Improved native grasses and establishment methods for use on military training lands by A. J Palazzo( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objective of this project was to develop more wear-resistant plants and evaluate the relationships between military training and plant injury, regrowth, and wear-resistance. Through plant breeding, we were able to improve traits related to resiliency and establishment in introduced and native species of rangeland grasses. We selected for early spring growth, increased seedling vigor, improved tiller and rhizome development after disturbance, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Our improved plant materials will be ecologically compatible at the military sites because they were developed from collections of species native to or previously seeded at these sites. We made advances in relating molecular markers to plant characteristics and in using DNA fingerprinting techniques to characterize genetic diversity. We used markers to identify species and plants that can grow better at low temperatures. We now have the tools to assess the genetic differences and similarities in commercial and natural seed sources, enabling land managers to select seed sources that will ensure genetic compatibility with existing populations. Our tank traffic studies showed that naturalized, introduced species are more tolerant and recover more rapidly under repeated tracking than native plants. However, two improved native species, western wheatgrass and Snake River wheatgrass, showed promise as stabilization species because of their ability to colonize damaged areas. Our studies on what we call "ecological bridges" confirm that we can select seed mixtures that will establish more rapidly than all-native mixes and will ultimately lead to healthy and persistent stands of native plants. The species in the seed mixtures and the equipment needed are readily available, and the seeding can be done in one application, thus saving money. Our improved germplasm will make these seeding mixes even more desirable
Antifreeze admixtures for concrete by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( Book )

5 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityU.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

C.R.R.E.L.

C.R.R.E.L. (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover N.H.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

CRREL

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory)

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

Hanover (N.H.). U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

K.R.R.E.L.

K.R.R.E.L. (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

KRREL

KRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii S.Sh.A. po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii SShA po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ po izuchenii︠u︡ inzhenernykh problem kholodnykh regionov (U.S.)

SIPRE (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Jusqu'en 1961)

U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories

U.S.Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

U.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, N.H.

United States. Army. Cold Regions Research and Engineerng Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Corps of enginneers. Engineer research and development center. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

US Army Corps of enginneers. Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

USACE. ERDC. CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

USACRREL

Languages
English (100)

Russian (2)