WorldCat Identities

Buckley, Donald H.

Overview
Works: 28 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 476 library holdings
Genres: History  Church history 
Classifications: TA418.7, 621.89
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Donald H Buckley Publications about Donald H Buckley
Publications by  Donald H Buckley Publications by Donald H Buckley
Most widely held works by Donald H Buckley
Surface effects in adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
11 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 342 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Surface effects in adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication
Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
6 editions published between 1971 and 1980 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Friction and transfer of copper, silver and gold to iron in the presence of various adsorbed surface films by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Texturing in metals as a result of sliding by Donald R Wheeler ( Book )
2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sliding friction experiments were conducted with copper, nickel, iron, and cobalt sliding on themselves in air and argon. The resulting wear surfaces were examined with X-ray analysis to determine if surface texturing had occurred as a result of sliding. Results of the investigation indicate that, for the face-centered-cubic metals copper and nickel, a (111) texture develops with the (111) planes tilted 10 deg in the direction of sliding. The body-centered-cubic metal iron exhibited a (110) texture with the (100) direction oriented in the direction of sliding. It also exhibited a 10 deg tilt in the direction of sliding. The environment influenced the results in that the degree of texture observed in argon was less than that seen in air for iron. No texturing was observed for the close-packed-hexagonal metal cobalt. Recrystallization was observed with copper as a result of sliding
Friction, wear, and transfer of carbon and graphite to copper, chromium, and aluminum metal surfaces in vacuum by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sliding friction experiments were conducted with amorphous and fully graphitized carbons sliding on copper and on films of chromium and aluminum on copper. Auger emission spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor carbon transfer to the metal surfaces. Friction and wear were also measured. Metal surfaces were examined both in the clean state and with normal oxides present. Results indicate that different metals have an important effect on friction, wear, and transfer characteristics. With amorphous carbon, the least chemically active metal gave the highest wear and amount of carbon transfer. Both forms of carbon gave lower friction and wear and lower transfer rates when in contact with clean, as opposed to oxide-covered, chromium surfaces. With copper, the reverse was true; cleaning was detrimental
A Fundamental Review of the Friction and Wear Behavior of Ceramics by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
2 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Adhesion of various metals to a clean iron (011) surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A short history of Tissington and its parish church by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Surface films and metallurgy related to lubrication and wear by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Metallic transfer between metals in sliding contact examined by Auger emission spectroscopy by Stephen V Pepper ( Book )
1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Metallic transfer between polycrystalline metals in sliding contact was examined. Hemispherical riders of iron, nickel, and cobalt were slid on tungsten, tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum disks in ultrahigh vacuum. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the elemental composition of the disk surfaces. Iron, nickel, and cobalt transferred to tungsten, whereas only cobalt transferred to tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum. The results of this investigation are discussed in terms of the cohesive energy and strain hardening characteristics of the specimen materials
Auger analysis of oxygen and sulfur interactions with various metals and the effect of sliding on these interactions by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Various gases were adsorbed to copper, aluminum, and chromium surfaces. The gases included oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Chemisorption was conducted on static surfaces and during dynamic friction experiments. An Auger cyclindrical mirror analyzer was used to monitor surface films. The sulfur containing gases adsorbed readily to all surfaces. Exposures of as little as 0.000001 (torr)(sec) (1 langmuir) were sufficient to reduce friction. Sliding contact did not affect chemisorption of copper or aluminum but did affect chemisorption to chromium surfaces. Oxygen removed sulfur films from all surfaces at room temperature (23 C). Gaseous exposures were from 0.000001 to 0.01 (torr)(sec) (1 to 10,000 langmuirs)
Influence of alloying elements on friction and wear of copper by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The friction and wear characteristics were determined for copper binary alloys containing 10 atomic percent aluminum, silicon, indium, and tin. A ternary alloy containing 10 atomic percent aluminum and 5 atomic percent silicon was also examined. The effectiveness of each of the alloying elements aluminum and silicon were very effective in reducing friction. Silicon, however, also reduced wear appreciably. With lubrication, silicon, indium, and tin were all effective alloying elements in reducing friction and wear from values obtained for copper. Silicon was the most effective single element in reducing friction and wear in dry sliding and with lubrication
Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface
Adhesion and friction behavior of group IV elements germanium, silicon, tin, and lead by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Adhesion and friction studies were conducted with thin films of the group IV elements silicon, germanium, tin, and lead ion plated on the nickel (011) substrate. The mating surface was gold (111). Contacts were made for the elements in the clean state and with oxygen present. Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted at very light loads of 1 to 10 g. Sliding was at a speed of 0.7 mm/min. Friction results indicate that the more covalently bonded elements silicon and germanium exhibit lower adhesion and friction than the more metallic bonded tin and lead. The adhesion of gold to germanium was observed, and recrystallization of the transferred gold occurred. Plastic flow of germanium was seen with sliding. Oxygen reduced, but did not eliminate, the adhesion observed with germanium and silicon
Friction and wear of iron-base binary alloys in sliding contact with silicon carbide in vacuum by Kazuhisa Miyoshi ( Book )
1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Friction behavior of members of the platinum metals group with gold by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The adhesion and friction behavior of the platinum metals group was examined with clean surfaces and surfaces selectively contaminated with oxygen, vinyl chloride (C2H3Cl), and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH). A pin or disk specimen configuration was used with the pin being a single crystal of gold of the (111) orientation and with the platinum metal disks also being single crystals of the (111) or (0001) orientation. Loads applied ranged from 1 to 10 g and a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min was employed. Results indicate adhesion and transfer of gold to all of the platinum metals. Despite this observation friction differences existed among the metals in the group. These differences are related to surface chemical activity. Adsorption of various friction reducing species was selective. With some adsorbates present strong adhesive forces between metals were still observed
Friction and wear of polyethylene oxide polymer having a range of molecular weights by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Sliding friction and wear experiments were conducted at light loads (25 to 250 g) with various molecular weights of the polyethylene oxide polymer sliding on itself and iron. Results of the experimental investigation indicate that: (1) the coefficient of friction for the polymer decreases with increasing molecular weight; (2) friction coefficient is higher for the polymer sliding on itself than it is for the polymer sliding on iron; (3) at sufficiently high loads localized surface melting occurs and the friction coefficient is the same for the polymer sliding on itself and iron; (4) fracture cracks develop in the sliding wear track at higher but not lower sliding velocities, reflecting a strain rate sensitivity to crack initiation, and (5) the friction coefficient for the polymer sliding on iron increases with the formation of a polymer film on the iron surface
Friction and Wear Behavior of Glasses and Ceramics ( Book )
1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Friction-induced surface activity of some hydrocarbons with clean and oxide-covered iron by Donald H Buckley ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Sliding friction studies were conducted on a clean and oxide-covered iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and accordingly friction. In contrast with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene
Adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluorethylene to metals studied by Auger emission spectroscopy ( Book )
1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The adhesion and transfer of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to metals in ultrahigh vacuum were studied. The transfer was effected both by compressive static contact and by sliding contact. The transfer observed after static contact was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. Electron-induced desorption of the fluorine in the transferred PTFE showed that the fluorine had no chemical interaction with the metal substrate. The coefficient of friction on metals was independent of the chemical constitution of the substrate. However, sliding PTFE on soft metals, such as aluminum, generated wear fragments that lodged in the PTFE and machined the substrate
 
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Audience level: 0.77 (from 0.00 for A Fundamen ... to 0.92 for Friction, ...)
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English (39)
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