WorldCat Identities

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 5,542 works in 7,902 publications in 2 languages and 75,976 library holdings
Genres: Maps  Bibliography‡vCatalogs  History  Atlases  Scientific atlases  Bibliography  Bibliographies  Catalogs  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Originator, Other, Publisher
Classifications: GB2401, 912.158197987
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Effects of ice boom geometry on ice capture efficiency by Gordon E Gooch( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 312 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice action on riprap : small-scale tests by D. S Sodhi( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 307 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Electromechanical phenomena in ice by Victor F Petrenko( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 306 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Electromagnetic induction sounding of sea ice thickness by Austin Kovacs( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 302 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Roof blisters : cause and cure by C. J Korhonen( )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 297 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The atmospheric boundary layer over polar marine surfaces by Edgar L Andreas( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 292 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice accretion in freezing rain by Kathleen F Jones( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 284 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ice jam flooding on the Missouri River near Williston, North Dakota by James L Wuebben( )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 263 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geobotanical atlas of the Prudhoe Bay region, Alaska by Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)( )

3 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Modeling ice passage through an auxiliary lock chamber with a submergible lift gate by Jon E Zufelt( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

River ice from the Des Moines and Fox Rivers combines with that of the Mississippi during spring breakup, resulting in massive ice accumulations upstream of Lock and Dam 20 on the Mississippi River. The accumulations in the upper lock approach area cause considerable delays to navigation, as ice must be passed through the lock chamber to clear the approach. A physical model study was conducted to determine the effects of using the existing auxiliary lock chamber to pass ice. The auxiliary lock chamber was fitted with a submergible lift gate at its upstream end that could be lowered to pass ice and clear the upperlock approach area. Model tests were conducted with real and plastic ice material to simulate the brash ice conditions encountered during low-flow prototype winter conditions. The submergible lift gate worked well in clearing ice accumulations from the upper lock approach. It was necessary to disturb the accumulation and keep it from refreezing by simulating towboat movement or high volume point source air bubblers to thoroughly clear the approach area ... Auxiliary lock chamber, Navigation lock, River transportation, Ice passage, Physical model, Submergible lift gate, River ice
ROOFER, a management tool for maintaining built-up roofs by David M Bailey( )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper describes ROOFER, a roofing maintenance management system for built-up roofs being developed by the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory with the assistance of the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory and the U.S. Army Engineering and Housing Support Center. ROOFER provides building managers with a practical tool for evaluating built-up roofs, determining maintenance priorities, and selecting repair strategies that ensure the maximum return on investment. ROOFER comprises procedures for dividing the building roof into manageable sections, collecting and managing inventory information, inspecting and evaluating condition, and managing networks and projects
Shock response of snow : analysis of experimental methods and constitutive model development by Jerome B Johnson( )

3 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A shock impact test was conducted on snow with an initial density of 400 kg/cu.m using a large-diameter gas gun and Lagrangian stress gauges between layers of snow. The shock propagation velocity ranged from 240 to 207 m/sec., the peak stresses in the snow were between 20 and 40 MPa, and the compacted snow density was less than 860 kg/cu.m. Interpretation of the stress records was complicated by the unsteady nature of the shock, impedance mismatching between gauges and snow, multiply-reflected pulses, and release waves generated at the edge of the target. A dynamic finite-element analysis was used to interpret the data, to construct a constitutive relationship for the snow, and to examine the importance of the release waves. Model calculations indicate two release wave sources: the free edge of the target aluminum buffer and the edge of the snow in contact with the copper container. The aluminum buffer release waves contain both shear and dilatational components. Transmission across the aluminum/snow interface significantly attenuated dilatational waves and essentially eliminated the shear waves. The snow/copper release wave did not arrive at the stress gauge position until after the end of the experiment. With the aid of model calculations, the pressure volumetric-strain (P-V) curve for initial shock loading was determined from arrival time information and stress measurements at the embedded gauges. Stress signals caused by reflected waves were used to determine the reloading and unloading P-V curve. The P-V response for shock loading was found to be much stiffer than that for quasi-static loading. The unloading P-V curves used in model calculations were nonlinear functions of volumetric strain with linear reloading
Determination of the water content of snow by dielectric measurements by Paul R Camp( )

4 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The dielectric properties of wet and dry natural snow were studied in the frequency range of 50 Hz to 100 kHz to determine whether measurements made in this frequency range might prove useful in evaluating the water content of snow. Dielectric heating at 20 kHz proved a very useful means of modifying the water content from 0 to 30% by weight. Six different natural snows were used in these experiments. Meltwater was analyzed for conductivity, pH, and impurity content. In addition to developing information on the dielectric properties of wet and dry snow, we measured the changes produced in dry snow by altering its density over the range of 0.11 to 0.66 g/cm3. Details of the experimental technique and the data obtained are fully reported. Our results do not lead to optimism about the usefulness of measurements in this frequency range alone for the determination of water content
A mathematical model for oil slick transport and mixing in rivers( )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstracts from the International Conference on Snow Hydrology : the integration of physical, chemical, and biological systems by International Conference on Snow Hydrology( )

6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Improved native grasses and establishment methods for use on military training lands by A. J Palazzo( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objective of this project was to develop more wear-resistant plants and evaluate the relationships between military training and plant injury, regrowth, and wear-resistance. Through plant breeding, we were able to improve traits related to resiliency and establishment in introduced and native species of rangeland grasses. We selected for early spring growth, increased seedling vigor, improved tiller and rhizome development after disturbance, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Our improved plant materials will be ecologically compatible at the military sites because they were developed from collections of species native to or previously seeded at these sites. We made advances in relating molecular markers to plant characteristics and in using DNA fingerprinting techniques to characterize genetic diversity. We used markers to identify species and plants that can grow better at low temperatures. We now have the tools to assess the genetic differences and similarities in commercial and natural seed sources, enabling land managers to select seed sources that will ensure genetic compatibility with existing populations. Our tank traffic studies showed that naturalized, introduced species are more tolerant and recover more rapidly under repeated tracking than native plants. However, two improved native species, western wheatgrass and Snake River wheatgrass, showed promise as stabilization species because of their ability to colonize damaged areas. Our studies on what we call "ecological bridges" confirm that we can select seed mixtures that will establish more rapidly than all-native mixes and will ultimately lead to healthy and persistent stands of native plants. The species in the seed mixtures and the equipment needed are readily available, and the seeding can be done in one application, thus saving money. Our improved germplasm will make these seeding mixes even more desirable
Comparison of thawing soil strength measurements for predicting vehicle performance by Sally A Shoop( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The CRREL Instrumented Vehicle (CIV), shear annulus, direct shear, and triaxial compression devices were used to characterize the strength of thawed and thawing soil. These strength values can be used in simple traction models to predict the tractive performance of vehicles. Strength was evaluated in terms of the parameters c' and phi' based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. It is proposed here that an instrumented vehicle is best suited for terrain characterization for mobility studies because the conditions created by a tire slipping on a soil surface are exactly duplicated. The c' and phi' values from the shear annulus were found to overpredict traction because of the low normal stress applied by the annulus and the curved nature of the failure envelope. Of all the tests, the direct shear test yielded the highest phi' value, most likely because the test was run at a slow deformation rate under drained conditions. The triaxial test results were the most similar to those from the vehicle. All test methods show phi' increasing with soil moisture up to the liquid limit of the soil and then decreasing. As measured with the vehicle, phi' was also found to be strongly influenced by the thaw depth. Freeze/thaw, Thaw depth, Vehicle mobility, Shear, Traction prediction comparison, Water moisture content, Soil strength, Unsaturated soil
Ground freezing effects on soil erosion of army training lands by Lawrence W Gatto( )

4 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On winter warfare by George K Swinzow( )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report is a review of the history and art of winter warfare. It attempts to publicize a neglected subject by making historical facts concerning it available in a single volume. Part 1 covers winter warfare through the ages, beginning with Genghis Khan and ending with World War II, a period of 700-odd years. Part 3 covers the art of winter warfare as practiced during recent decades. Part 2 consists of illustrations which present additional points and expand upon the other two parts. It is noted that throughout history the lessons learned on the subject have continually been ignored and forgotten. All other conditions being equal, the most important factors determining an army's winter warfare capability are the individual soldier's willingness to accept hardship, the quality of his training, including survival skills, and his morale. Snow, ice and low temperatures can become a strategic advantage to the well-trained, highly motivated combatant.--Abstract
Supercritical fluid chromatography for the analysis of nitroaromatics, nitramines and nitrate esters by Paul H Miyares( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 208 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityU.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

C.R.R.E.L.

C.R.R.E.L. (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover N.H.)

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)

CRREL

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory)

CRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

Hanover (N.H.). U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

K.R.R.E.L.

K.R.R.E.L. (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

KRREL

KRREL (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.))

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii S.Sh.A. po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ Armii SShA po izuchenii︠u︡ kholodnykh regionov KRREL

Laboratorii︠a︡ po izuchenii︠u︡ inzhenernykh problem kholodnykh regionov (U.S.)

SIPRE (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Jusqu'en 1961)

U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories

U.S.Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

U.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, N.H.

United States. Army. Cold Regions Research and Engineerng Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

United States Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

United States U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

US Army Corps of enginneers. Engineer research and development center. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

US Army Corps of enginneers. Snow, ice and permafrost research establishment (Wilmette, Illinois, Etats-Unis)

USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

USACE. ERDC. CRREL (Hanover, New Hampshire, Etats-Unis)

USACRREL

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