WorldCat Identities

Bay Area Writing Project

Overview
Works: 50 works in 69 publications in 1 language and 928 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Abstracts 
Classifications: PE1405.U6, 808.04207073
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Bay Area Writing Project
Teaching writing : essays from the Bay Area Writing Project by Gerald Camp( Book )

6 editions published between 1982 and 1983 in English and held by 369 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Each written by a classroom teacher and based on the experience of that teacher working with his or her students, the articles in this collection are an extension of the Bay Area Writing Project assumptions. Many contain samples of writing done by students in response to the writing tasks described. After a preamble that discusses what is already known about composition, the first article describes the sequence of developmental stages that young writers pass through in the primary grades. The next three articles offer suggestions for developing fluency in writing. Prewriting activities such as formative writing and mapping are discussed in the next two entries, which are followed by three articles that focus on drafting and offer suggestions for writing from given information, using the freshman handbook, and teaching expository writing. The final two articles focus on responding and revising, with emphasis given to using student response groups and to teachers and students writing together. (Hod)
Properties of writing tasks : a study of alternative procedures for holistic writing assessment by James Gray( )

in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The speech events underlying written composition" : a study of effective writing instruction in inner-city secondary schools by Miles Myers( Book )

4 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A four-year study by the Bay Area Writing Project was conducted to determine the writing competency of inner-city secondary school students on proficiency tests. To determine whether patterns among secondary students reflected developmental trends, the study also examined samples of student writing from grades 4 through 12, for the years 1978, 1980, and 1981. The study concluded that the essays at the four levels of writing competency contained four underlying speech events: (1) encoding, (2) conversations, (3) presentations, and (4) expositions. Based on the theory of underlying speech events, which provides a way of understanding the problems of students who are attempting to move from one competency level to another, the study suggested fluency, focus, and form as three primary problems for students as they move from low to high competency levels. (Writing samples are included in the body of the report, and appendixes include an example of coded copy of student writing during a videotape session, rankings of anchor- or prototype papers by national sample, examples of coding sheets, samples of the anchor- or prototype papers, and a ten-page bibliography.) (Hth)
"The interaction of teacher roles in the teaching of writing in inner-city secondary schools" by Miles Myers( )

in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Showing-writing : a training program to help students be specific by Rebekah Caplan( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A training program designed to teach high school students to be specific in their writing is described in this booklet. The first section of the booklet explains the three stages of the program: (1) daily practice in translating a "telling" sentence into a "showing" paragraph; (2) application of "showing" writing to the editing and revision process; and (3) the study of particular techniques to improve specificity. The second section of the booklet describes a study conducted to test the effectiveness of the training program. Among the reported findings are: a concentrated training program can make a significant contribution to students' writing skills, and students are less likely to transfer specific techniques to their usual writing style if those techniques are not systematically reinforced in a variety of ways in all phases of the instructional program. Appendixes contain a copy of the writing test used in the study and student writing samples. (FL)
Mapping the writing journey by Marilyn Hanf Buckley( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The tutor and the writing student : a case study by Jerry Herman( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This booklet is one of a series of teacher-written curriculum publications launched by the Bay Area Writing Project, each focusing on a different aspect of the teaching of composition. The first part of the booklet describes a college writing center and the tutorial teaching that takes place in the center. The second part reports a case study of a student who worked through six drafts of a piece of writing. Appended is a transcript of the tutorial session on the fifth draft. (AEA)
Expectation and cohesion by Gordon M Pradl( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Writing from given information by Stephanie Gray( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Peer tutoring in basic writing : a tutor's journal by Jackie Goldsby( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Providing a complex representation of a beginning writing tutor's role, this monograph, written as a journal, was drawn from a tutor's own perceptions and those of her students. While refinement of composition skills frames the entire narrative, the day-by-day record of the tutor's first quarter also emphasizes such skills as goal setting, effective questioning, and motivating students to become self-confident learners. The appendix includes information sheets given to students and tutors at the Writing Center, Student Learning Center at the University of California, Berkeley; the sheets deal with how to get the most out of tutoring, goal setting for writing tutors, the goal-setting process, and how to avoid doing a student's homework. A measure of student tutoring style, a personal checklist of tutoring skills, and an instructor's guide to marking symbols and grammatical terms are also included in the appendix. (Hod)
Two studies of writing in high school science( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teaching expository writing by Richard Murphy( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sentence and paragraph modelling by James Gray( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Independent study and writing( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Writing for the inexperienced writer : fluency, shape, correctness by Marlene Griffith( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This booklet is one of a series of teacher-written curriculum publications launched by the Bay Area Writing Project, each focusing on a different aspect of the teaching of composition. After a brief introduction in which the writing concepts of fluency, shape, and correctness are defined, the rest of the booklet presents the work of three beginning writers who enrolled in a college writing workshop program to improve their language skills. Actual samples of the students' writing are used to demonstrate their progress in improving their writing fluency, and the techniques used by their tutor/readers are explained. (Aea)
The write occasion by Patrick Woodworth( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Inventio or discovery : some reflections on prewriting by Sabina Thorne Johnson( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prewriting involves the entire period of time (and necessary activities) which extends between knowing that one is going to write on something and knowing that one has found something specific and substantial to say about it. In classical rhetoric, prewriting is expressed by such terms as "inventio" (whereby the writer discovers ideas to write about) and "topoi" (the general probes or a series of questions one might ask about a subject in order to discover things to say about that subject). An intellectual approach to prewriting depends upon a formal set of questions, the equivalent of classical topoi. The intuitional approach, on the other hand, seeks to generate ideas by forcing the writer to dredge up from the subconscious the impression of the material that is stored there. There is some confusion of whether prewriting processes should be linear or alinear, sequential of simultaneous, methodically imposed or organically generated. Proponents of the intellectual approach would make the first choice in each instance. However, there is no real order for creativity--it just happens. Teachers of writing can and should come to understand a great deal about composing through careful observation, introspection, contemplation, and reflection. For what teachers of writing need, but have not had, is a reservoir of wisdom and sophistication about writing upon which to draw. (Hod)
The interaction of teacher roles in the teaching of writing in inner-city secondary schools by Miles Myers( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In a two-year study of the teaching of writing in inner city secondary schools, the writing episode was examined as an interaction of teacher roles--as instructor, policy implementer, and member of a professional community. After a period of field testing observation instruments--field notes, segment summaries, and first level data analysis in a matrix--the nonparticipant observers observed writing instruction in 14 classrooms; interviewed the teachers, using both an open format and questionnaire; and interviewed case study students, using both a constant assignment for all and an assignment from the individual class. In addition, the district anchors for ranking writing in the proficiency examination were distributed to teachers in seven cities across the country. These teachers ranked the same papers, estimated the number of students they had at various levels, answered the questionnaire, and had some of their students write on what assignments seemed the most helpful. The data from the seven cities provided a basis for the inference that the 14 classrooms were representative of other inner city classrooms. The findings suggest that teaching effectiveness is context dependent, that the institution has an internalized tradition which influences both teachers and students and helps shape writing instruction, and that the writing episode exhibits inconsistencies between composition theory and teaching practice, thereby raising questions about how effective instruction should be defined. (Author)
Curriculum publication( )

in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The National Writing Project evaluation portfolio by Bay Area Writing Project( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.46 (from 0.36 for Teaching w ... to 0.84 for A study of ...)

Alternative Names
University of California, Berkeley. Bay Area Writing Project

University of California, Berkeley. School of Education. Bay Area Writing Project

Languages
English (54)