WorldCat Identities

McGuire, Kelly R.

Overview
Works: 24 works in 52 publications in 1 language and 1,749 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author, Contributor
Classifications: E78.N4, 979.48
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Kelly R McGuire
The prehistory of Gold Butte : a virgin river hinterland, Clark County, Nevada by Kelly R McGuire( )

10 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 1,189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Prehistory of Gold Butte uses a theoretical perspective rooted in human behavior ecology and other foraging models to present the results of one of the largest and most comprehensive archaeological investigations ever undertaken in southern Nevada, involving the systematic survey of more than 31,000 acres, the documentation of more than 377 sites, and the excavation of nine prehistoric sites. Gold Butte--at the crossroads of the Mojave Desert, the Great Basin, and the Colorado Plateau in southern Nevada--has a 12,000-year record of human occupation with archaeological elements that can be traced to all three culture zones. Dramatic developments occurred in this area of the Desert West. Farmers suddenly appeared in the Virgin River basin about 1,600 years ago. At such iconic sites as Lost City, Main Ridge, and Mesa House, full village and agricultural life developed over the span of a few hundred years only to completely vanish by AD 1250 after a series of droughts and other cultural disruptions. The Patayan held sway for several hundred years, between AD 1100 and 1500, but didn't advance much beyond the Colorado River corridor. Finally, the Southern Paiute arrived and occupied not only the Virgin River basin and Gold Butte but much of the northwestern quadrant of the Southwest from at least the time of historic contact (AD 1500) to the present. This mix of cultures illustrates historical contingency, inplace development, and external relationships that should be expected along a boundary area such as Gold Butte. By looking at hinterlands adjoining the prehistoric settlements that clustered along the Virgin River corridor before, during, and after the Puebloan period, the authors suggest that changes in settlement- subsistence and lifeways at core settlements along the riverine corridor have corresponding effects on the character and intensity of hinterland occupation."--Page 4 of cover
Archaeological investigations in the southern Sierra Nevada : the Lamont Meadow and Morris Peak segments of the Pacific Crest Trail( Book )

3 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological investigations in the southern Sierra Nevada : the Bear Mountain segment of the Pacific Crest Trail by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prehistory of Nevada's Northern Tier : archaeological investigations along the Ruby Pipeline by William R Hildebrandt( Book )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ruby Pipeline originates in Opal, Wyoming, travels westward across Utah and Nevada, and terminates in Malin, Oregon. Almost 360 miles of the line is in Nevada, where it crosses through some of the most remote, sparsely populated land in the lower 48 states. Despite the remote nature of this corridor, it has produced a rich archaeological record reflecting a dynamic history of land-use pattern changes over a period of at least 13,000 years. Archaeological excavations were conducted at 578 prehistoric sites prior to construction of the pipeline. The sites were distributed across four ecological regions, including (from west to east): the High Rock Country, Upper Lahontan Basin, Upper Humboldt Plains, and Thousand Springs Valley. First evidence of human occupation dates to the Paleoindian (14,500-12,800 cal b.p.) and Paleoarchaic (12,800-7800 cal b.p.) periods, when people spent most of their time in the High Rock Country where important economic resources reached their highest densities. Paleoindian findings are limited to a series of Great Basin Concave Base projectile points and small obsidian flaked stone concentrations. Paleoarchaic sites are much more common, and tend to be represented by Great Basin Stemmed projectile points, bifaces, and a limited number of other flaked stone tools. Most of these assemblages reflect small groups of hunters refurbishing their tool kits as they traveled through the area. An important exception to this pattern was found at Five Mile Flat along the west end of pluvial Lake Parman where two significant habitation sites dating to 11,180 cal b.p. were discovered. One of these sites includes a house floor, which is the oldest ever found in the Great Basin. Despite the warm-dry conditions that characterized much of the middle Holocene, it appears that human populations nearly doubled during the Post-Mazama Period (7800-5700 cal b.p.). Most activity remained concentrated in the High Rock Country, but evidence for occupation begins to trickle out into the Upper Lahontan Basin and Upper Humboldt Plains regions as well. Most of the artifact assemblages remain rather narrow, often composed of Northern Side-notched and Humboldt Concave Base points, bifaces, and debitage, and reflect use of the region by mobile groups of hunters. Major changes took place with the arrival of the Early Archaic (5700-3800 cal b.p.) and continued forward into the Middle Archaic Period (3800-1300 cal b.p.). Early Archaic projectile points are largely represented by Humboldt and Gatecliff forms. It appears that population densities increased almost fourfold from the preceding interval, and all four regions experienced significant occupation for the first time. Simultaneous to this population increase and dispersal, a full complement of site types began to emerge, with large-scale residential areas becoming significant for the first time. This trend continued forward into the Middle Archaic Period where the relative frequency of residential sites almost doubled compared with the Early Archaic interval. Plant macrofossil and archaeofaunal assemblages also become more abundant and diversified at this time, probably marking a broadening of the diet breadth. This general trajectory extends into the Late Archaic (1300-600 cal b.p.) and Terminal Prehistoric periods, as people continued to expand into a wider range of habitats. This was particularly the case for the latter interval, as the habitat preferences that made sense for over 12,000 years were upended, with population densities highest in the Upper Humboldt Plains and Thousand Springs Valley. This reorientation corresponds to the arrival of Numic speaking populations, especially the Western Shoshone who appear to have reached northern Nevada much earlier than the Northern Paiute, and is probably linked to a greater emphasis on small-seeded plants that are abundantly present in their territory. Although low ranked compared to many other foods, with the proper technology and work organization, small seeds could support higher population densities than was the case earlier in time. Finally, the discovery of obsidian in multiple Terminal Prehistoric sites from sources located much farther away than any other time in the past may signal the earliest use of horses in northern Nevada
At the vanishing point : environment and prehistoric land use in the Black Rock Desert by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This volume presents the results of data recovery excavations directed at prehistoric archaeological deposits located near Sulphur Springs, along the southeastern margin of the Black Rock Desert, in Humboldt and Pershing counties, Nevada. Although 20 sites with prehistoric assemblages were identified during this project, intact spatio-temporal components were found at only seven of these sites, of which just five were the focus of intensive data recovery excavations: 26HU1830, 26HU1876, 26HU2871, 26HU3118, and 26HU5621. A total of 372 m³ of excavation by hand was directed at dateable components within these five sites. The results of this effort yielded a substantial artifact assemblage, including a variety of flaked and ground stone tools, shell and bone beads, as well as large quantities of faunal bone and debitage. Also documented were an assortment of features, including a number of small processing facilities and the remnants of several house floors. Key to this investigation was the isolation of a series of discrete temporal components. Eleven such components were identified representing six temporal intervals: Early Archaic (5700-3800 cal b.p.), Middle Archaic (ca. 3000 cal B.P.), mixed Middle/Late Archaic (3800-600 cal B.P.), Late Archaic A (1340-1165 cal B.P.), Late Archaic B (985-855 cal B.P.), as well as Late Archaic (1300-600 cal B.P.) deposits that could not be further separated into smaller units of time. It is particularly noteworthy that many of these components have very narrow time frames, in many cases smaller than the traditional Great Basin periods. The profile of projectwide time-sensitive projectile points and radiocarbon dates, coupled with a robust artifact and feature assemblage dated to narrow time frames, allows for an assessment of changes in habitation and land-use pattern with an unusual level of resolution. Prior to about 4500 years ago, occupations appear to have been sporadic, with people making brief visits to the area during periods of increased effective moisture and spring discharge associated with the Early Holocene, and largely avoiding it for more promising areas during times of drought during the Middle Holocene. Archaeological visibility increases significantly after 4500 cal B.P., including periods when substantial houses were constructed, and people supplemented the local resource base with foods and materials obtained from distant locations possessing richer concentrations of large game and obsidian toolstone. These more intensive habitations were not constant, however, and were abandoned during a major Late Holocene drought cycle that occurred between 2800 and 1500 cal B.P. Robust habitation returns during the initial Late Archaic period but is bimodal with a sudden break at about 1000 B.P., a spike at roughly 985 to 855 cal B.P., followed by another break. The settlement profile may have been in response to the drought-wet-drought cycle of the Medieval Climatic Anomaly. Along with the role of environmental change in trans-Holocene settlement structure, the large feature and artifact assemblages provide commentary on a variety of other research themes, including the rise of Middle Archaic residential stability and logistical hunting; Middle versus Late Archaic domestic/habitation patterns; local cryptocrystalline silicate (CCS) toolstone production and obsidian conveyance patterns; subsistence-settlement variation within the Late Archaic Period; and an assessment of the missing Terminal Prehistoric record within the project area and surrounding region"--
Boundary lands : archaeological investigations along the California-Great Basin interface( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological excavations at Pie Creek and Tule Valley shelters, Elko County, Nevada by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The archaeology of CA-INY-30 : prehistoric culture change in the southern Owens Valley, California by Mark Basgall( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stealing the sun by Kelly R McGuire( )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Test excavations at CA-FRE-61, Fresno County, California by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological investigations in the Southern Sierra Nevada : the Lamont Meadow and Morris Peak segments of the Pacific crest trail by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

4 editions published between 1979 and 1980 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sacramento River bank protection, Unit 36 : intensive resources survey by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

2 editions published between 1979 and 1980 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fort Sage uplands and Spanish Springs Valley by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Place of many soldiers" : archaeological investigations at Crooks Canyon by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report on an Archaeological Survey in Tiefort Basin, Fort Irwin, San Bernardino County, California by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A 36 square kilometer cultural resource survey was made of Tiefort Basin, located at Fort Irwin, California. Tiefort Basin is used by the National Training Center (NTC) as a central staging area for monthly force on force engagements of opposing mechanized units which necessarily results in the disturbance of large tracts of land and adverse impacts to cultural resources. This study was undertaken as part of a multi-phase program of inventory, site evaluation, and mitigation developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, in consultation with the NTC, to manage the cultural resources contained at Fort Irwin. The survey resulted in the identification and recordation of 12 prehistoric sites and 74 isolated artifact/feature locations. These archeological locations, as well as those recorded during previous investigations, are differentially distributed across five broad geomorphic units, each with a differing constellation of hydrological, biological and depositional features. Prehistoric subsistence-settlement activity during the approximate 10,000 years of human occupation of Tiefort Basin was focused primarily on the bottom-lands and dune areas on and adjacent to Tiefort Wash northwest of Bitter Spring. In contrast, basin piedmonts to the north and east of Tiefort Wash appear never to have been significantly used. These findings, combined with the results of previous archaeological investigations in the area, may have relevance in terms of several proposed models of prehistoric culture in the Mojave Desert
Archaeological investigations in the El Paso Mountains of the western Mojave Desert : the Bickel and Last Chance sites (CA-Ker-250 and -261) by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secret Valley by Kelly R McGuire( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological investigations along the California-Great Basin interface : the Alturas transmission line project( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Pavement quarries, Gypsum period residential stability, and trans-Holocene settlement systems of the Mojave Desert : a case study at Fort Irwin by Brian F Byrd( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Archaelogical investigations in the Southern Sierra Nevada, the Lamont Meadow and Morris Peak segments of the Pacific Crest Trail( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.25 (from 0.09 for The prehis ... to 0.99 for Archaelogi ...)

Alternative Names
MacGuire, Kelly R.

Mc Guire, Kelly R.

McGuire, Kelly.

McGuire, Kelly (Kelly R.)

Languages
English (48)