WorldCat Identities

Grimmett, Richard F.

Overview
Works: 152 works in 462 publications in 1 language and 8,416 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1108, 335.7091822
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Richard F Grimmett
War powers resolution : presidential compliance by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

53 editions published between 1995 and 2011 in English and held by 346 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two separate but closely related issues confront Congress each time the President introduces armed forces into a situation abroad that conceivably could lead to their involvement in hostilities. One issue concerns the division of war powers between the President and Congress, whether the use of armed forces falls within the purview of the congressional power to declare war and the War Powers Resolution. The other issue is whether or not Congress concurs in the wisdom of the action. This report does not deal with the substantive merits of using armed forces in specific cases, but rather with the congressional authorization for the action and the application and effectiveness of the War Powers Resolution. The purpose of the War Powers Resolution (P.L. 93-148, passed over President Nixon s veto on November 7, 1973) is to ensure that Congress and the President share in making decisions that may get the United States involved in hostilities. Compliance becomes an issue whenever the President introduces U.S. forces abroad in situations that might be construed as hostilities or imminent hostilities. Criteria for compliance include prior consultation with Congress, fulfillment of the reporting requirements, and congressional authorization. If the President has not complied fully, the issue becomes what action Congress should take to bring about compliance or to influence U.S. policy. A related issue has been congressional authorization of U.N. peacekeeping or other U.N.-sponsored actions
U.S. military installations in NATO's southern region : report by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

3 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Executive-legislative consultation on U.S. arms sales by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

4 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 149 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

United States military installations and objectives in the Mediterranean : report by Library of Congress( Book )

5 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The War Powers Resolution after thirty years by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

18 editions published between 1999 and 2012 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report discusses and assesses the War Powers Resolution, its application since enactment in 1973, providing detailed background on a variety of cases where it was utilized, or issues of its applicability were raised. It will be revised biannually. In the post-Cold War world, Presidents have continued to commit U.S. Armed Forces into potential hostilities, sometimes without a specific authorization from Congress. Thus the War Powers Resolution and its purposes continues to be a potential subject of controversy. The War Powers Resolution (P.L. 93-148) was passed over the veto of President Nixon on November 7, 1973, to provide procedures for Congress and the President to participate in decisions to send U.S. Armed Forces into hostilities. Section 4(a)(1) requires the President to report to Congress any introduction of U.S. forces into hostilities or imminent hostilities. When such a report is submitted, or is required to be submitted, section 5(b) requires that the use of forces must be terminated within 60 to 90 days unless Congress authorizes such use or extends the time period. Section 3 requires that the President in every possible instance shall consult with Congress before introducing U.S. Armed Forces into hostilities or imminent hostilities
United Nations peacekeeping by Marjorie Ann Browne( Book )

5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The War Powers Resolution( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conventional arms transfers to developing nations, 1994-2001 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

6 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report is prepared annually to provide unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding 8 calendar years. Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world. Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1994-2001, the value of arms transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 68.3% of all such agreements worldwide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations constituted 65.8% of all such agreements globally from 1998-2001, and 60.5% of these agreements in 2001. The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2001 was nearly $16 billion. This was the lowest total, in real terms, for the entire period from 1994-2001. In 2001, the value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was $14.4 billion, the lowest total in deliveries values for the entire period from 1994-2001 (in constant 2001 dollars). Recently, from 1998-2001, the United States and Russia have dominated the arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first each of the last 4 years in the value of arms transfer agreements. From 1998-2001, the United States made $35.7 billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, in constant 2001 dollars, 40.8% of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period, made over $19.8 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 22.6.%. France, the third leading supplier from 1998-2001, made $6.3 billion or 7.2% of all such agreements with developing nations during these years
U.S. use of preemptive military force by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

9 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report reviews the historical record regarding the uses of U.S. military force in a "preemptive" manner, an issue that emerged during public debates prior to the use of U.S. military force against Iraq in 2003. It examines and comments on military actions taken by the United States that could be reasonably interpreted as preemptive in nature. For the purposes of this analysis, a preemptive use of military force is considered to be the taking of military action by the United States against another nation so as to prevent or mitigate a presumed imminent military attack or use of force by that nation against the United States. The deployment of U.S. military forces in support of U.S. foreign policy, without their engaging in combat, is not deemed to be a preemptive use of military force. This review includes all noteworthy uses of military force by the United States since the establishment of the Republic. A listing of such instances can be found in CRS Report RL30172, "Instances of Use of United States Armed Forces Abroad, 1798-2001." For an analysis of international law and preemptive force, see CRS Report RS21314, "International Law and the Preemptive Use of Force Against Iraq." This report will be updated if significant events warrant
U.S. Army School of the Americas : background and congressional concerns by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

8 editions published between 1998 and 2001 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The School of the Americas was a U.S. Army training facility founded in 1946 largely for Spanish-speaking cadets and officers from Latin American nations. The School was located at Fort Benning, Georgia. Controversies developed in recent years concerning human rights abuses committed by School graduates, and there were several legislative attempts since 1993 to cut funding for the School. The School was charged by P.L. 100-180 (10 USC 4415) with the mission of developing and conducting instruction for the armed forces of Latin America. The law stipulated that the School would promote military professionalism, foster cooperation among the multinational military forces in Latin America, and expand Latin American armed forces' knowledge of U.S. customs and traditions. According to critics, the School had abusive graduates who violated human rights. They maintained that soldiers who were chosen to attend were not properly screened, with the result that some students and instructors attended the School even after being implicated in human rights violations. In September 1996, concerns over the School intensified when DOD made available excerpts from seven Spanish language training manuals used at the School from 1982 until 1991. The manuals discussed forms of coercion against insurgents, including execution and torture
Conventional arms transfers to the Third World, 1986-1993 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The selections included herein begin with a discussion of major research findings regarding the dollar value of both arms transfer agreements and arms deliveries to the Third World from 1986 through 1993. These findings are all cross-referenced to comparative data tables which are presented following the textual material. Special attention is given to the roles of the United States, the former Soviet Union, and China as arms suppliers, to arms trade with Iran and Iraq, and to identification of the leading Third World arms recipient nations. The report concludes with a listing of the type and quantity of weapons delivered to the Third World by major arms suppliers in the 1986-1993 time period. Copies
Conventional arms transfers to the third world, 1984-1991 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

5 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The major political transition wrought by the end of the Cold War continued in 1991, accelerating the changes under way in 1990 which have had a significant impact on the Third World arms marketplace. The dramatic political and economic evolution in the Soviet Union contributed to a substantial decline in its arms transfer agreements with the Third World in 1991. The United States, meanwhile, remained the leader in arms sales to the Third World. Reductions in domestic defense spending in many nations became a matter of acute concern to their weapons exporting industries. The United Nations embargo against Iraq has removed it from its previous position as one of the largest Third World arms purchasers, leading to intense competition among former suppliers for new arms deals elsewhere. Finally, in 1991, in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, a number of initiatives have been launched to control destabilizing conventional arms transfers, especially to the Near East region. The collaboration of the United States, the Soviet Union and other nations in opposing the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait led to the denial of new arms transfers to Iraq under the aegis of a United Nations embargo. Subsequently, in early 1991, much of Iraq's military arsenal was destroyed during Operation Desert Storm. These events had the effect of removing Iraq, historically one of the Third World's largest arms purchasers, from the arms marketplace. The loss of Iraq as a weapons purchaser had an especially significant effect on the former Soviet Union, as Iraq for years had been its largest weapons customer, and one that had the ability to pay for its weapons in hard currency or its equivalent
Arms sales : congressional review process by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

9 editions published between 1992 and 2012 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report reviews the process and procedures that currently apply to congressional consideration of foreign arms sales proposed by the President. This includes consideration of proposals to sell major defense equipment, defense articles and services, or the re-transfer to third party nations of such military items. Under Section 36(b) of the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), Congress must be formally notified 30 calendar days before the Administration can take the final steps to conclude a government-to-government foreign military sale of major defense equipment valued at $14 million or more, defense articles or services valued at $50 million or more, or design and construction services valued at $200 million or more. In the case of such sales to NATO member states, NATO, Japan, Australia, or New Zealand, Congress must be formally notified 15 calendar days before the Administration can proceed with the sale. However, the prior notice threshold values are higher for sales to NATO members, Australia, Japan, or New Zealand. Commercially licensed arms sales also must be formally notified to Congress 30 calendar days before the export license is issued if they involve the sale of major defense equipment valued at $14 million or more, or defense articles or services valued at $50 million or more (Section 36(c) AECA). In the case of such sales to NATO member states, NATO, Japan, Australia, or New Zealand, Congress must be formally notified 15 calendar days before the Administration is authorized to proceed with a given sale. As with government-to-government sales, the prior notice threshold values are higher for sales to NATO members, Australia, Japan, or New Zealand
Conventional arms transfers to developing nations, 1988-1995 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

6 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following are extracts from an unclassified report of conventional arms transfers to developing nations (and developed nations as well) as published under the above title by the Library of Congress on 15 August 1996. The selections included herein begin with a discussion of major research findings regarding the dollar value of both arms transfer agreements and arms deliveries to the developing countries from 1988 through 1995. These findings are all cross-referenced to comparative data tables which are presented following the textual material. Special attention is given to the roles of the United States, the former Soviet Union, and China as arms suppliers, and to identification of the leading Third World arms recipient nations. The report concludes with a listing of the type and quantity of weapons delivered to developing nations by major arms suppliers in the 1988-1995 time period
U.S. armed forces abroad, 1798-2007 by Lisa Mages( Book )

7 editions published in 2009 in English and Undetermined and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report lists relevant congressional roll call votes for several major instances in which U.S. Armed Forces have been sent abroad in potentially hostile situations. These votes are representative of those that have a direct correlation to issues affecting policy and funding of troops abroad, often in the context of the War Powers Resolution, continued presence or withdrawal, or "use of force". The cases of Lebanon (1982-1983), Grenada (1983), Panama (1989), the Persian Gulf War (1990-1991), Somalia (1992-1995), Haiti (1993-1996), Bosnia (1992-1998), Kosovo (1999), the terrorist attack against America (2001) (including the use of U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan), and the use of U.S. Armed Forces against Iraq (2002-present) are examined. Those roll call votes that are available online (since 1990 in the House and 1989 in the Senate) are linked. This report will be updated as events or legislation warrant
Conventional arms transfers : President Clinton's policy directive by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Military technology and conventional weapons export controls : the Wassenaar arrangement by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

6 editions published between 1996 and 2006 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report provides background on the Wassenaar Arrangement, which was formally established in July 1996 as a multilateral arrangement aimed at controlling exports of conventional weapons and related dual-use goods and military technology. It is the successor to the expired Coordinating Committee for Multilateral Export Controls (COCOM). This report focuses on the current status, features, and issues raised by the establishment and functioning of the Wassenaar Arrangement. It will be updated only if warranted by notable events related to the Arrangement
Declarations of war and authorizations for military forces by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

7 editions published in 2009 in English and Undetermined and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trends in conventional arms transfers to the third world by major supplier, 1981-1988 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. arms sales : agreements with and deliveries to major clients, 1996-2003 by Richard F Grimmett( Book )

7 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report provides background data on United States arms sales agreements with and deliveries to its major purchasers during calendar years 1998-2005. In a series of data tables, it lists the total dollar values of U.S. arms sales agreements with its top five purchasers in five specific regions of the world for three specific periods: 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and 2005 alone, and the total dollar values of U.S. arms deliveries to its top five purchasers in those same regions for the periods 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and for 2005 alone. In addition, the report provides data tables listing the total dollar values of U.S. arms agreements with and deliveries to its top 10 purchasers worldwide for the periods 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and for 2005 alone. This report is prepared in conjunction with the annual CRS report for Congress entitled: Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1998-2005 (CRS Report RL33696), by Richard Grimmett. That report details both U.S. and foreign arms transfer activities globally, and provides analysis of arms trade trends. The intent here is to complement that elaborate worldwide treatment of the international arms trade by providing only the dollar values of United States arms sales agreements with and delivery values to its leading customers, by geographic region, for the calendar years 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and 2005. Unlike CRS Report RL33696, this report focuses exclusively on U.S. arms sales, provides the specific names of the major U.S. arms customers, by region, together with the total dollar values of their arms purchases or deliveries. This report will not be updated
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.56 (from 0.01 for U.S. armed ... to 0.69 for War powers ...)

United Nations peacekeeping
Languages
English (171)

Covers
United Nations peacekeepingThe War Powers ResolutionConventional arms transfers to developing nations, 1994-2001U.S. armed forces abroad, 1798-2007Declarations of war and authorizations for military forces