WorldCat Identities

Cowles, Milly

Overview
Works: 30 works in 56 publications in 1 language and 1,356 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Academic theses  Conference papers and proceedings  History  Biography  Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: LC4091, 371.96
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about Milly Cowles
 
Most widely held works by Milly Cowles
Perspectives in the education of disadvantaged children; a multidisciplinary approach by Milly Cowles( Book )

15 editions published between 1967 and 1987 in English and held by 496 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of original papers presents an interdisciplinary approach to the education of disadvantaged children. The volume, prepared especially for preservice and inservice teachers, is divided into three sections--poverty and its effects, the children of poverty, and educational implications. The first two parts deal with such areas as anthropology, medicine, social work, sociology, and psychology. Part 3 is devoted to guidance practices, preschool programs, curriculum for early childhood and elementary levels, educational change, and research needs. (Nh)
Developmental discipline by Kevin Walsh( Book )

4 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Activity-oriented classrooms by Milly Cowles( Book )

4 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 324 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Taming the young savage by Kevin Walsh( Book )

2 editions published between 1980 and 1981 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The civilized child : a practical guide to discipline by Kevin Walsh( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

School begins with kindergarten : a resource book for principals( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quality early childhood education in the South by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Perspectives in the education of disadvantaged children( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A comparative study of certain social and emotional adjustments of homogeneously and heterogeneously grouped sixth grade children by Milly Cowles( )

2 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

They all learn : the story of a sequential progress, progressive educational programs in Williamsburg County, South Carolina( Visual )

2 editions published between 1975 and 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shows the transformation of twelve rural schools in South Carolina into a successful open program. Emphasizes the combined effort to improve achievement levels of the children in an individualized, continuous progress program
Early childhood education : issues and problems by Milly Cowles( Recording )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Selections from Organic education : teaching without failure by Marietta Johnson( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Effects of Individualized Instruction on Head Start Pupils'Achievement by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fourteen students at the university of south carolina, most of them experienced teachers, enrolled in an experimental training program in early childhood education attempting to determine whether or not short periods of individualized training over a period of 5 weeks would be reflected in pupils' readiness as measured by the metropolitan readiness test. Fourteen head start classes were assigned randomly to the experimental teacher-students and 14 head start classes to the control teacher-students. One male and one female were selected randomly from each of the experimental and control classes. On form a, the pretest, the t-ratio did not approach significance. On form b, the post-test, the t-ratio approached significance at the 10 percent level of confidence. Data showed that pupils who received special instruction gained during the pre- to post-testing periods and that most pupils in the control group either lost or remained at about the same level. The study recommended that a similar experiment be conducted for various time periods. It is recommended that teachers learn more about diagnosing pupils' instructional levels and about strategies for appropriate treatments. This paper was presented at the american educational research association conference (chicago, february 6-10, 1968). (jm)
Perspectives in the education of disadvantaged children. A multidisciplinary approach. Milly Cowles, Editor by Milly Cowles( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arts in education, frolic or fundamental : a monograph of the symposium on Arts in Education( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Psycholinguistic Behaviors of Black, Disadvantaged Rural Children by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study was designed to compare the psycholinguistic abilities of a randomly selected sample of 32 kindergarten children and 32 first grade children (with no kindergarten experience) and to analyze any discrepancy existing between psycholinguistic age (pla) and chronological age (ca). Each of the kindergarten classrooms from which children were selected was staffed by a teacher and teacher assistant who had received a 6-week intensive training session emphasizing language development. Instruction was largely informal, although perception, language, and concept development were emphasized. A wide variety of materials was available for self-selection by children. Each of the eight first grade classrooms was staffed by one teacher who had received no special training. Instruction was highly structured for total group participation in a teacher dominated atmosphere. The rooms were usually void of materials that could be self-selected by students. Both groups were given the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (itpa) at the end of 5 months of school. Analysis of variance of the data indicated that the kindergarten children scored significantly higher than the first graders on seven of the 10 subtests of the itpa and that the discrepancy between ca and pla was significantly less for kindergarten subjects than first grade subjects. (Mg)
Comparative Study of Certain Social and School Adjustments of Childrenin Two Grouping Plans by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper reviews previous research into ability grouping and describes a study of the relationship of heterogeneous and homogeneous grouping plans on children's concepts of their interpersonal relationships with other students and their academic success. Most studies on the emotional impact of ability grouping indicated that being placed in the low group carries a certain social stigma, although findings in one study suggested that students of low ability levels have higher feelings of self-worth in homogeneous settings. Studies concerned with self-image and social relationships found that children were aware of grouping, even in heterogeneous classes, and that peer acceptance was greater in heterogeneous classes. Studies of attitude and self-concept of children in homogeneous grouping programs showed that these programs seemed to be most beneficial for children in the high status groups. In the study reported here 713 sixth grade students (356 homogeneously grouped, 357 heterogeneously grouped) from six elementary schools were administered a questionnaire devised to test the students' concepts of their interpersonal acceptance and academic success. Results indicated that homogeneously grouped children indicated more favorable adjustment to other children and schoolwork than heterogeneously grouped children, though there appeared to be as much, if not more, difference from class to class in each organizational plan than between the two large organizational plans. Some sex differences were found. Results were sufficiently varied to suggest that the entire grouping question should be studied in depth. (Sb)
Psycholinguistic Behaviors of Rural Children by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes an attempt to break the socioeconomic educational poverty cycle of rural black children in Williamsburg County, South Carolina. Early childhood education was identified as the area for the greatest concentration of effort. Training and retraining of instructional staff was mandated. Twenty-two kindergarten classes were placed in the eight high priority elementary schools in the 1968-1969 year. Instruction was largely informal, but there were short periods when the emphasis was on language development. From these elementary schools, a sample of kindergarten children and a sample of first grade children were administered the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (itpa) at the end of five months of school. The first grade children in the sample had no kindergarten experience. Kindergarten subjects scored significantly higher on seven of the ten subtests of the itpa. It is concluded that kindergarten experience and instruction can lay the foundation for continued growth in achievement for rural, disadvantaged children. (Author/MC)
Psycholinguistic Behaviors of Isolated, Rural Children with and without Kindergarten by Milly Cowles( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper reports part of a longitudinal study to assess the psycholinguistic abilities of rural children given various educational opportunities. Twenty-two kindergartens were established, each with a teacher and a teacher aide. Prior to the opening of school, the staff was exposed to a six-week intensive training session. An inservice training program stressed personal and professional preparation throughout the year. The kindergarten program was informal but emphasized language development activities. Evaluation was based on the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (itpa) administered to randomly selected samples of 32 no-kindergarten and 31 kindergarten children at the end of five months in their "enriched" first grades in high priority (low economic status) schools. Data processed through both multivariate analysis of variance and analysis of variance revealed that subjects with kindergarten experience scored significantly higher than those without kindergarten on six of the ten subtests. While the need for more carefully controlled research was indicated, early education did appear to be important for this population. (Wy)
Social Consciousness and Discipline by Kevin Walsh( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The act of disciplining children cannot be based upon merely "putting a stop" to negative actions by means of reactionary techniques of control. If educators begin to consider discipline as a major aspect of the educational aim of socialization of children, significant contributions toward their moral and social development will take place. Socialization must be a major element in a total education for students. Discipline within this social education must be preventative as well as corrective and based on the Trinity of Discipline--structure, intervention, and consistency. It must guide children in the development of a social consciousness and not merely be seen as a means of repentant melancholy. Discipline must be a process constructed and enacted in harmony with moral educational theory, whereby children experience social consequences consistent with the next-higher moral stage in their development. Discipline as an aspect of the social life of the school must contribute to the cognitive moral development of children and not merely restrict or shape them, for social consciousness is a product conceived in thought and interaction rather than blind obedience. (Author/DCS)
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.34 (from 0.21 for Quality ea ... to 0.84 for Psycholing ...)

Languages
English (48)