WorldCat Identities

National Institute of Justice (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 4,263 works in 7,973 publications in 1 language and 388,968 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Conference papers and proceedings  Case studies 
Roles: Sponsor, Publisher, Funder, Other, Editor, Producer, isb
Classifications: HV7245, 364.97305
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about National Institute of Justice (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by National Institute of Justice (U.S.)
Aptitude for destruction by Brian A Jackson( )

16 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3,573 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Better ways are needed to understand how terrorist groups become more effective and dangerous. Learning is the link between what a group wants to do and its ability to actually do it; therefore, a better understanding of group learning might contribute to the design of better measures for combating terrorism. This study analyzes current understanding of group learning and the factors that influence it and outlines a framework that should be useful in present analytical efforts and for identifying areas requiring further study
Challenges and choices for crime-fighting technology : federal support of state and local law enforcement by William Schwabe( )

5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2,183 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Under the American federal system, most law is cast as state statutes and local ordinances; accordingly, most law enforcement is the responsibility of state and local agencies. Federal law and federal law enforcement come into play only where there is rationale for it, consistent with the Constitution. Within this framework, a clear role has been identified for federal support of state and local agencies. This report provides findings of a study of technology in use or needed by law enforcement agencies at the state and local level, for the purpose of informing federal policymakers as they consider technology-related support for these agencies. In addition, it seeks to characterize the obstacles that exist to technology adoption by law enforcement agencies and to characterize the perceived effects of federal assistance programs intended to facilitate the process. The study findings are based on a nationwide Law Enforcement Technology Survey and a similar Forensics Technology Survey (FTS) conducted in late spring and early summer2000, interviews conducted throughout the year, focus groups conducted in autumn 2000, and review of an extensive, largely nonacademic literature. Companion reports: Schwabe, William, Needs and Prospects for Crime-Fighting Technology: The Federal Role in Assisting State and Local Law Enforcement, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND, 1999. Davis, Lois M., William Schwabe, and Ronald Fricker, Challenges and Choices for Crime-Fighting Technology: Results from Two Nationwide Surveys, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND, 2001
Long-term effects of law enforcement's post-9/11 focus on counterterrorism and homeland security by Lois M Davis( )

5 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2,070 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the need for increased counterterrorism (CT) and homeland security (HS) efforts at the federal, state, and local levels has taken the spotlight in public safety efforts. In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, many law enforcement agencies (LEAs) shifted more resources toward developing CT and HS capabilities, and the federal government continues to support these efforts with grants provided through the Department of Homeland Security. This monograph examines the long-term adjustments that large urban LEAs have made to accommodate the focus on CT and HS, as well as the advantages and challenges associated with it. The study relies primarily on in-depth case studies of five large urban LEAs, as well as a review of federal HS grant programs and a quantitative analysis of the potential costs associated with shifting law enforcement personnel from traditional policing to focus on HS and CT functions. Major trends among the five case study LEAs include the creation of specialized departments and units, as well as an increased emphasis on information-sharing, which, nationwide, has led to the creation of fusion centers that serve as formal hubs for regional information-sharing networks. LEAs' HS and CT efforts are also greatly influenced by the restrictions and requirements associated with federal HS grant funding. Finally, using cost-of-crime estimates, it is possible to partially quantify the costs associated with LEAs' shifting of personnel away from traditional crime prevention toward CT and HS -- there are also clear benefits associated with law enforcement's focus on CT and HS, but they are difficult to quantify, and this is posing a challenge for LEAs as the economic downturn puts pressure on public budgets
What's changing in prosecution? : report of a workshop by Philip B Heymann( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,396 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fostering innovation in community and institutional corrections : identifying high-priority technology and other needs for the U.S. corrections sector by Brian A Jackson( )

7 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 1,334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The agencies of the U.S. corrections enterprise manage offenders confined in prisons and jails and those who have been released into the community on probation and parole. The enterprise is one of the three central pillars of the criminal justice system, along with police and the courts. Corrections agencies face major challenges from declining budgets, increasing populations under supervision, problems of equity and fairness in administrating justice, and other concerns. To better achieve its objectives and play its role within the criminal justice enterprise, the sector needs innovation in corrections technology, policy, and practice. This report draws on published literature and new structured deliberations of a practitioner Corrections Advisory Panel to frame an innovation agenda. It identifies and prioritizes potential improvements in technology, policy, and practice in both community and institutional corrections. Some of the top-tier needs identified by the panel and researchers include adapting transcription and translation tools for the corrections environment, developing training for officers on best practices for managing offenders with mental health needs, and changing visitation policies (for example, using video visitation) to reduce opportunities for visitors to bring contraband into jails and prisons. Such high-priority needs provide a menu of innovation options for addressing key problems or capitalizing on emerging opportunities in the corrections sector. This report is part of a larger effort to assess and prioritize technology and related needs across the criminal justice community for the National Institute of Justice{u2019}s National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center system
Crime and justice. a review of research. by Michael H Tonry( Book )

38 editions published between 1988 and 2010 in English and held by 1,087 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume covers a range of criminal justice issues, from the effects of parental imprisonment on children to economists and crime
National Institute of Justice journal( )

in English and held by 977 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preventing gang- and drug-related witness intimidation by Peter Finn( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 788 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Perspectives on crime and justice : lecture series( )

in English and held by 773 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strategies for disrupting illegal firearms markets : a case study of Los Angeles by Greg Ridgeway( )

6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 757 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Could a data-driven, problem-solving approach yield new interventions to disrupt local, illegal gun markets serving criminals, gang members, and juveniles in Los Angeles? Law enforcement can analyze patterns in crime-gun data to trace illicit firearm acquisition, use community-based interventions to stem the illegal flow, and use retail ammunition-purchase records in identifying prohibited firearm possessors
Legal interventions in family violence : research findings and policy implications( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 749 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Topics covered include children's testimony, prosecution of child abuse and neglect cases, sentencing, elder abuse, civil protection orders, arrest, prosecution and defense, treatment
When the victim is a child by Debra Whitcomb( Book )

4 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 732 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Forensic sciences : review of status and needs( )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 725 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The armed criminal in America : a survey of incarcerated felons by James D Wright( )

4 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 691 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Local prosecution of environmental crime by Theodore M Hammett( Book )

6 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 687 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Broken windows and police discretion by George L Kelling( Book )

4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 650 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road ahead : unanalyzed evidence in sexual assault cases by Nancy Ritter( )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 649 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Violent encounters : a study of felonious assaults on our nation's law enforcement officers by Anthony J Pinizzotto( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 642 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Visions of law enforcement technology in the period 2024-2034 : report of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop by R. S Silberglitt( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 630 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report describes the results of the Law Enforcement Futuring Workshop, which was held at RAND's Washington Office in Arlington, Virginia, from July 22 to 25, 2014. The objective of this workshop was to identify high-priority technology needs for law enforcement based on consideration of current and future trends in society, technology, and law enforcement over a ten- to 20-year time period. During the workshop, participants developed sets of future scenarios, constructed pathways from the present to alternative futures, and considered how law enforcement use of technology might affect these pathways. They then identified technology needs (including training and changes in policies or practice) that, if addressed, could enable pathways to desirable futures or prevent or mitigate the effects of pathways to undesirable futures. On the final days of the workshop, the technology needs were prioritized using a Delphi method. The output of this workshop described in the report included ten future scenarios and 30 technology needs. The technology needs fell into three general categories--technology-related knowledge and practice, information sharing and use, and technology research and development--and were placed into three priority tiers"--Back cover
Implementing telemedicine in correctional facilities by Peter L Nacci( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 629 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Challenges and choices for crime-fighting technology : federal support of state and local law enforcement
Covers
Challenges and choices for crime-fighting technology : federal support of state and local law enforcementLong-term effects of law enforcement's post-9/11 focus on counterterrorism and homeland securityWhat's changing in prosecution? : report of a workshopCrime and justice. a review of research.Strategies for disrupting illegal firearms markets : a case study of Los Angeles
Alternative Names

controlled identityNational Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice

controlled identityUnited States. Department of Justice

controlled identityUnited States. Office of Justice Programs

Amerikas Savienotās Valstis. Dept. of Justice. National Institute of Justice

Amerikas Savienotās Valstis. National Institute of Justice

Amerikas Savienotās Valstis. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice

Etats-Unis Department of justice National institute of justice

Förenta staterna. Department of Justice.‏ ‎ National Institute of Justice

Förenta staterna. Department of Justice.‏ ‎ Office of Justice Programs.‏ ‎ National Institute of Justice

Förenta staterna. Office of Justice Programs.‏ ‎ National Institute of Justice

Institute of Justice Washington, DC

N.I.J.

N.I.J. (National Institute of Justice (U.S.))

National Institute of Justice

National Institute of Justice (U.S.)

Nat︠s︡ionalʹnyĭ instytut i︠u︡styt︠s︡iï Departamentu i︠u︡styt︠s︡iï SShA

NIJ

NIJ (National Institute of Justice (U.S.))

NIJ規格

U.S. Department of Justice National Institute of Justice

United States.‏ ‎ Department of Justice.‏ ‎ National Institute of Justice

United States.‏ ‎ Department of Justice.‏ ‎ Office of Justice Programs.‏ ‎ National Institute of Justice

United States Dept. of Justice National Institute of Justice

United States National Institute of Justice

United States. Office of Communication and Research Utilization. National Institute of Justice

United States. Office of Development, Testing and Dissemination. National Institute of Justice

United States Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice

國家司法研究院

Languages
English (190)