WorldCat Identities

Lategola, M. T.

Overview
Works: 41 works in 110 publications in 1 language and 3,839 library holdings
Genres: Technical reports 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by M. T Lategola
Aviation-related cardiorespiratory effects of blood donation in female private pilots( Book )

7 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ten healthy female pilots, 20-49 years old and weighing more than 110 pounds were tested for tolerances to hypoxia orthostatic stress, and physical work at 1 and 3 d after donating about 450 mL of blood on one occasion, and 6 mL (sham control) on a second separate occasion. Testing included consecutive 30-min seated exposures to each of four oxygen-nitrogen mixtures (equal to air breathing at 6,000, 8,000, 10,000 and 12,400 ft of altitude), 5 min of quiet standing, and seated pedal ergometry graded to produce a heart rate of 140 beats per min. The findings of this study indicated that, if the complete absence of adverse symptoms at ground level, a pilot may return to flying between 1 and 3 d after blood donation with the recommended initial precautions that: cabin altitude be limited to <6,000 during flight; and +Gz stress exceeding the equivalent of short-duration level turns at 30 deg of bank angle be avoided. Until complete restoration of the pilot's in-flight physiological tolerances has occurred, the presence of a copilot and on-board availability of supplemental oxygen are also recommended
A device and method for rapid indirect measurement of human systolic and diastolic blood pressures by M. T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An indirect blood pressure measuring device and method were evolved for human use. This system is capable of providing 30 measurements each of systolic and diastolic pressures per minute. The system utilizes two brachial blood pressure cuffs (one on each arm) and fully automatic cycling for each pressure measurement. The main advantages of this system are: (1) minimum circulatory impedance during each measurement; (2) the capability of measuring rapid blood pressure transients; and (3) the complete avoidance of all the inherent risks of intra-arterial catheterization. (Author)
Biodynamic evaluation of air traffic control students between 1960-1963 by M. T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 213 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Between 1960-1963, a large number of ATC students in training at the FAA Aeronautical Center in Oklahoma City underwent a broad spectrum of biomedical evaluations conducted by the Civil Aeromedical Research Institute (CARI). Approximately 1,270 of these students were evaluated for physical fitness. Included in this evaluation were measurements of height, weight, pulmonary vital capacity, maximum breathing capacity, maximum aerobic working capacity. Principal findings were: physical fitness levels comparable to general population norms of health and expected parameter decredments with age. The age-related decrements in the measured physical parameters generally paralleled the ATC training failure rate. These data will serve as baselines for future evaluations of career ATC personnel in relation to job performance and preventive maintenance of optimum cardiovascular health. (Author)
Comparison of status variables among accident and non-accident airmen from the active airman population( Book )

3 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Changes in cardiovascular health parameters over an eight-year interval in an ATC population segment by M. T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

During 1960-1963, the Civil Aeromedical Research Institute (CARI) conducted a broad spectrum of biomedical evaluations on a large number of air traffic control (ATC) students. Approximately 1270 of these students (20-50 years of age) underwent biodynamic evaluation of physical fitness. From these data, the relationships of maximum oxygen uptake (MVO2/Kg bw), resting SBP and DBP to age and the FRWI (an obesity indicator) were examined. General data trends indicated an increase in SBP and DBP with age and the FRWI. The MVO2/Kg bw showed a general trend of decrease as both age and the FRWI increased. In 1970, approximately 475 of the original 1270 ATC students possessed current airman medical certificates. An average age increase of 8.3 years had occurred. Relevant data from the current aeromedical certification files were examined. The average weight gain was approximately nine percent. The 1970 resting SBP and DBP also increased with both age and the FRWI. The percent incidence of the 400 pathology code, as well as resting exercise and recovery heart rates, increased with age and the FRWI. An overall pattern has emerged which indicates an advancing relative susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD) in those individuals with a combination of advanced age and obesity. (Author)
The aeromedical assessment of human systolic and diastolic blood-pressure transients without direct arterial puncture by M. T Lategola( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A system for virtually continuous measurement of both systolic and diatolic blood pressures without recourse to direct arterial puncture has been effected by the modification of already existing standard equipment. This system entails the measurement of systolic blood pressure with a digital pressure cuff on one arm simultaneously with the measurement of diastolic blood pressure from a bracial cuff mounted on the other arm. The systolic-pressure device was used virtually unmodified. The diastolic-pressure device was originally designed to measure both systolic and diastolic pressures automatically. The modification consisted mainly in the elimination of the systolic portion of the automatic cycle. The combined system is capable of routinely obtaining measurement frequencies in the order of 20 per minute for protracted time periods. The system functions well under all resting-subject conditions and under some 'body-movement' conditions. This system is currently in routine use in all our aeromedically oriented research involving the assessment of cardiopulmonary function
Amplitude/frequency differences in a supine resting single-lead electrocardiogram of normal versus coronary heart diseased males by M. T Lategola( Book )

5 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 208 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A resting 'normal' ECG can coexist with known angina pectoris, positive angiocardiography and previous myocardial infarction. In contemporary exercise ECG tests, a false positive/false negative total error of 10% is not unusual. Research aimed at improved screening detection of coronary heart disease (CHD) evaluated amplitude/frequency analysis of high fidelity ECG recordings. Thirty normal males and 30 with documented CHD were selected. The results from the CM5 lead recorded at supine rest are presented. Comparison of the normal versus CHD groups across the 30-subject average amplitude values for each of 200 harmonics per segment revealed significant differences at most of the 200 harmonics. Two criteria, based only on the maximum and minimum amplitude values for each of the 200 harmonics, succeeded in individual screening separation of the normal versus CHD males. The results compare favorably with those of seventeen clinical studies using exercise electrocardiography. (Modified author abstract)
The use of simple indicators for detecting potential coronary heart disease susceptibility in the third-class airman population by M. T Lategola( Book )

5 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An analysis was made of an eight-year interval change in several Framingham Heart Study (FHS) indicators of coronary heart disease (CHD) susceptibility as measured on 475 male air traffic control (ATC) personnel. The initial measurements were obtained from these personnel as ATC students in 1960- 1963 and the subsequent data were obtained eight years later from their current aeromedical certification records. This analysis revealed a general trend of advancing relative susceptibility to CHD with age and obesity. As a logical followup, analyses of similar data from 23,826 male ATC personnel and 424,333 male third-class airmen were accomplished. This report covers only the latter population segment. The data were obtained from current aeromedical certification records in January 1971. The distributions of resting blood pressure (BP), resting heart rate (HR) and the 400 pathology code prevalence were compiled in age versus Framingham relative weight index (FRWI) tables. In accordance with the FHS, obesity was defined as a minimum FRWI of 120.0%. Substantiating earlier findings all parameters generally increased with age and obesity
The use of simple indicators for detecting potential coronary heart disease susceptibility in the air traffic controller population by M. T Lategola( Book )

5 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An analysis was made of an eight-year interval change in several indicators of coronary heart disease (CHD) susceptibility as measured on 475 male air traffic control (ATC) personnel. The initial measurements were obtained from these personnel as ATC students in 1960-1963 and the subsequent data were obtained eight years later from their current aeromedical certification records. This analysis revealed a general trend of advancing relative susceptibility to CHD with age and obesity. Sample sizes (in age by abesity cells) were frequently too small to warrant any statement of significance for this general trend. As a logical followup, an analysis of similar data from 23,826 male ATC personnel was accomplished. The data were obtained from current aeromedical certification records in January 1971. The distributions of resting blood pressure (BP), resting heart rate (HR) and the 400 pathology code frequency were compiled in age versus Framingham relative weight index (FRWI) tables. Obesity was defined as a minimum FRWI of 120.0%. Substantiating earlier findings, all parameters generally increased with age and obesity. (Author)
Height and weight errors in aeromedical certification data by M. T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 204 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Framingham Relative Weight Index (FRWI) of obesity was described in previous reports as a screening aid for detecting susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD). FRWI calculation requires measured values of height and weight but the height and weight values on standard airman medical applications are usually stated estimates of the examinee. Because such stated (unmeasured) data are vulnerable to error, samples from aeromedical certification sources were examined for errors. In a separate study, the stated and measured weights of 206 ATC personnel were compared. The degree of stated-weight error was substantial and was directly proportional to the degree of underweight or overweight. Due to weight understatement by grossly overweight individuals, the 120.0% FRWI classification of obesity based on stated weight is quite conservative. (Modified author abstract)
Evaluation of the Sierra, hanging, quick-don, crew, pressure-breathing, oxygen mask by E. B McFadden( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clinical aviation medicine : a physical-conditioning program for cardiac patients : a progress report by John Naughton( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In vivo" measurement of total gas pressure in mammalian tissue by M. T Lategola( Book )

3 editions published in 1963 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cardiorespiratory assessment of decongestant-antihistamine effects on altitude, +Gz, and fatigue tolerances by M. T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Decongestants and antihistamines are known to produce effects capable of adversely modifying physiological function and psychomotor task performance. Because of relevance to safe pilot performance, the effects of single doses of two decongestant-antihistamine preparations (Compound A and Compound B), or a placebo on cardiorespiratory responses to two equally spaced +2Gz tests during separate 2-hour exposures at ground level (GL) (1,274 ft MSL) and 12,500 ft chamber altitude were assessed. Postaltitude fatigue was assessed by cardiorespiratory responses to submaximal bicycle ergometry. Compound A and Compound B appeared to exert no significant detrimental effects on short-duration postaltitude ergometric fatigability. With two exceptions, all combinations of medication, altitude, and +Gz were well tolerated. Two subjects were clearly incapacitated during the first +2Gz test under Compound A at 12,500 ft altitude. It is felt that the +Gz intolerance resulted mainly from an adverse interactive effect of Compound A and altitude on vasomotor and/or chronotropic mechanisms
Cardiorespiratory assessment of 24-hour crash-diet effects on altitude, +Gz, and fatigue tolerances by M. T Lategola( Book )

6 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 131 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Eleven male surrogates of general aviation pilots, 25-40 years old, were tested for altitude, +Gz, and fatigue tolerances with and without previous fasting for 24 h. Testing included 2 min of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -40 torr (equivalent to +2Gz) after 118 min at 3,810 m chamber altitude and, after returning to ground level pressure, ergometry of 50 watts (W) for 6 min. The fast had no statistically significant effect on altitude and fatigue tolerances. One subject, who tolerated 2 min of LBNP in the nonfasting condition, lost useful consciousness during this test in the fasting condition. Although the remaining 10 subjects tolerated 2 min of LBNP in both fasting and nonfasting conditions without statistically significant differences in quantitated parameters, 2 of them during fasting manifested symptoms usually associated with impending syncope. Pilots should be informed that a 24-h fast may reduce the margin for safe tolerance of> or = +2Gz flight maneuvers. (Author)
Altitude tolerance of general aviation pilots with normal or partially impaired spirometric function by M. T Lategola( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of prior physical exertion on tolerance to hypoxia, orthostatic stress, and physical fatigue by M. T Lategola( Book )

6 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ten healthy men, 20-35 years old, were tested for tolerance to hypoxia, orthostatic stress, and physical fatigue after a period of rest, and, on another occasion, after a period of physical exertion. Exertion consisted of four 10-min periods of pedal ergometry; each period consisted of a 30-watt (W) load imposed for 2 min, 60 W for 4 min, and 100 W for 4 min. Testing included a 100-min exposure to an oxygen/nitrogen gas mixture equivalent to 3658 m of altitude, 2 min of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at -40 torr differential pressure, and 6 min of 50 W pedal ergometry. Psychomotor testing was conducted during hypoxic exposure. Although some statistically significant (p <or = 0.05) physiological decrements were associated with prior physical exertion, psychomotor performance and mentation were not significantly affected. In this study, prior physical exertion produced no adverse effects on physiological tolerances, mentation, or psychomotor performance
A lower body negative pressure box for +Gz simulation in the upright seated position by Michael T Lategola( Book )

4 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The cost of purchasing and operating a human centrifuge is substantial. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) is considered an acceptable experimental substitute for the +Gz stress of the centrifuge. Since civil aviation pilots are usually subjected to +Gz stress in an upright seated position, an upright seated version of the supine LBNP box was developed. In this version, a negative pressure of -40 mm Hg is considered the equivalent of a +2 Gz stress. This box has successfully withstood a test pressre of -120 mm Hg. Pedal ergometry within the box is easily accomplished. The box was anthropometrically engineered to accommodate a human height range of 160-195 cm. Locating the box within an altitude chamber allows the application of LBNP at any level of chamber altitude. The total cost of fabrication is approximately $500
Three reports relevant to stress in aviation personnel by E. A Higgins( Book )

3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of cardiopulmonary factors critical to successful emergency perinatal air transport by M. T Lategola( Book )

5 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regionalization of specialized perinatal care is a fully viable and progressing concept. The two major components of regionalized care are the level III care facility and the air transport service. In descending importance, the medical transport team, the pilot and aircraft, and related technology and equipment are the three most important components of the transport service. Although significant reductions in perinatal morbidity and mortality have already resulted from development of regional care, additional progress is possible and desirable. Areas of possible improvement are: earlier precrisis diagnosis of maternal and/or fetal risk at level I care; supplementary training of medical transport personnel in perinatal aspects of Aviation Medicine, Physiology, and Safety; technology or preflight stabilization of the pregnant mother or the neonate; adjunct medical training of transport pilots; exclusive use of multiengine, fixed-wing, all-weather aircraft; and technology of in-flight life support and monitoring equipment and methods
 
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Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.47 for Evaluation ... to 0.62 for Cardioresp ...)

Alternative Names
Lategola, Michael T.

Languages
English (80)