WorldCat Identities

Horowitz, Stanley A.

Overview
Works: 76 works in 107 publications in 1 language and 141 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: U408.3, 355.22360973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Stanley A Horowitz
Indicators of training readiness by Jesse Orlansky( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper is concerned with ways of improving the reliability and accuracy of SORTS, the Status of Readiness and Training System used to report the readiness of the Services for combat to senior officials in the Department of Defense. Although SORTS includes some subjective and potentially unreliable information, indicators of the amounts of training conducted, such as number of flying hours and steaming days, are robust and statistically valid predictors of such combat-related capabilities as bombing accuracy, battle deaths in war, and success in air-to-air combat in exercises and in war. The utility of SORTS for reporting Joint and Service readiness can be enhanced by including certain measures already being used by some of the Services, such as percent of crew qualified and percent of operational readiness inspections rated excellent or outstanding
Economic principles of liability and financial responsibility for oil pollution by Stanley A Horowitz( Book )

3 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The paper examines the economic issues involved in the imposition of liability for the damages caused by disasters in general and major oil spills in particular. The conclusions reached are the following: Unlimited liability with absolute fault is to be preferred to limited liability when one takes the welfare of society as a whole into account; It may be desirable to levy fines on polluters above payment of damages; Oil companies do not have a right to carry on polluting activities; and The government should make certain that financial responsibility is provided for. (Author)
Quantifying seapower readiness by Center for Naval Analyses( Book )

3 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the past two years, Congress has come to realize that it needs more precise data to better grasp the implications of its decisions on the funding of readiness-related accounts. Beginning with the 1978 Defense Authorization Act, Congress required the Department of Defense to include in its budget submission data that would indicate the effect of the requested appropriations on material readiness. The same act also requested DoD to compile a report detailing measurable materiel readiness requirements. While some observers have broadly defined readiness as the ability of a force, unit, weapon system, or equipment to achieve a specifically defined wartime objective, others, including members of the Department of Defense Readiness Management Steering Group, have defined it as the ability of a force, unit, ship, weapon system or equipment to perform the function for which it is organized or designed. Readiness includes material, personnel, training, and supply components. These determine the mission readiness of individual units. Achievement of the ultimate goal-force effectiveness-requires consideration of such additional factors as threat, force size, capability, and strategy. Whatever aspect is chosen, it must be appropriate to the situation and measurable, especially if an analysis is to reflect real-world rather than simulated data
Is the military budget out of balance? by Stanley A Horowitz( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Occasionally one reads or hears complaints about the status of manpower, logistics and support in the development of the Department of Defense budget. It is felt that the United States spends too much to buy fancy new equipment, and not enough to man and support it adequately. The analytic issue is whether it is cheaper to get additional defense capability by buying more forces or by spending more to keep smaller forces working. This paper addresses this issue by examining four case studies. The analyses behind the case studies were performed at the Center for Naval Analyses during the last twelve years. Thus, they all examine Navy systems. I see no reason to believe that Air Force or Army analyses would yield different results. Each of the analyses focuses on the production of weapons system availability by application of additional support resources. The case studies look at the value of spare parts and people in producing equipment readiness. Specifically, they address the payoff to additional spare parts to repair ships, fixed-wing aircraft, and helicopters, and to additional personnel aboard surface combatants. For each of these four examples I will describe the research being drawn on, display the quantitative between support expenditures and system availability it derived, and compare the cost of buying availability via support with the cost of availability implicit in the life-cycle cost of equipment
Crew characteristics and ship condition : maintenance personnel effectiveness study (MPES) by Stanley A Horowitz( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The productivity of enlisted personnel aboard ships is estimated as a function of their personal characteristics. Ship readiness is measured by the material condition of shipboard equipment. Up to now, little has been known about the relative value of different kinds of personnel. The goal of this study is to improve on the assumptions, underlying Navy personnel policies. Casualty reports from 91 cruisers, frigates, and destroyers are used to study how the productivity of enlisted personnel varies systematically with high school graduation, entry test scores, paygrade, experience, Navy training, race and marital status. Six occupations and three subsystems are examined separately. Equipment complexity, ship age, and overhaul frequency are accounted for. Implications are drawn for Navy policies regarding recruitment, retention, manning, rotation, and pay. (Author)
Defense-related spending in China : a preliminary analysis and comparison with American equivalents( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examining the draft debate by Christopher Jehn( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Topics include: Prejudices about the AVF concept; Costs; Socioeconomic factors; Quality of volunteers, Skilled manpower shortages; Race; Political problems; and International perceptions
Active-reserve integration in the Coast Guard by John R Brinkerhoff( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The US Coast Guard has a long history of successfully integrating disparate organizations into a unified military organization. In 1915 the Coast Guard was created by combining the Revenue-Cutter Service with the Lifesaving Service. Subsequent additions to the Coast Guard's functions were those of the Lighthouse Service in 1939 and of the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation in 1946. The Coast Guard Reserve grew out of a need for port security and ship crews during mobilization for World War II. After the war, the Coast Guard Reserve operated as a separate entity from the Active Coast Guard before drawing attention in the late 196Os and early 197Os for its lack of use. Since then, the Coast Guard has slowly and steadily undergone a process of augmentation, alignment, consolidation, and integration of its Active and Reserve Components. Today, Team Coast Guard represents a fully integrated service. The story of how the Coast Guard developed since its inception over 80 years ago can be instructional to the Department of Defense as it considers making better use of the Active and Reserve Components of the Army, Navy, and Air Force
The Relative Costs of Formal and On-the-Job Training for Navy Enlisted Occupations by Rodney Weiher( Book )

3 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of the study of Navy enlisted personnel specialized training is to determine, in as many ratings as possible: Which major skills can be learned on the job; The learning curves for non-A-school grads and for A- school grads; and The relative costs of training third-class petty officers via formal training and on job training
Conference on force integration : seeking better reserve component capability and credibility by Charles F Hawkins( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Commission on Roles and Missions of the Armed Forces has suggested that integration and cooperation between the Active Components (AC) and the Reserve Components (RC) of the military would yield more effective support from the Reserve Component. A group of representatives from the DoD, the Army, the Army National Guard, and IDA met in November of 1995 to explore how to bring more capability and credibility to the RC. This document presents background information on the conference's two main topics: Army RC combat unit training and ACIRC integration in the Army before summarizing activities during and outcomes of the conference. The conference consisted of opening presentations and discussion, followed by working group sessions. The presentations were on (1) the development of the enhanced brigade training strategy and (2) an IDA-developed model for estimating the post-mobilization/pre-deployment training time necessary for RC combat brigades and battalions. One of the working groups addressed heavy and infantry brigade pre-deployment training and the time required to train for certain roles and missions. The other group looked at how integration affects the capability and credibility of RC combat units. Though participants drew no formal conclusions, consensus was reached on several issues about training, readiness, and integration
Alternative approaches to organizing, training and assessing Army and Marine Corps units( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An analysis of commercial commodity acquisition by Bruce N Angier( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are potential cost savings available to the military through increased purchase of commercial, as opposed to designed-to-specification, equipment and material. This study differs from previous work in that it tries to develop low-cost, survey information on potential savings, and it is designed to be preliminary to a field test of candidate equipment. The equipment studied is that assigned to and used by a Marine 105mm howitzer battery. The method used to gather the commercial cost estimates was to survey commercial manufacturers to obtain cost data on possible substitutes. This method uncovered several items with significant cost-saving potential. (Author)
Flying hours and aircrew performance by Colin P Hammon( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This work addresses the development of quantitative relationships between how much aircrews have flown and how well they perform important aspects of their missions. It is determined that additional flying enhances proficiency in two ways: through the short-run honing of skills and through the long-run development of mastery. Estimates of the strength of the links between flying experience and three measures of performance are developed. The measures are: bombing accuracy, the quality of landings aboard aircraft carriers, and kills in air combat maneuvering exercises. In general, it is found that while both short- run experience are important, career experience has a stronger relationship than recent experience to performance
The effect of unemployment insurance laws and administration on unemployment rates by Arlene Holen( Book )

2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A production function for trained recruits by Rodney Weiher( Book )

2 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Naval training operations resources are used to turn raw recruits into trained personnel. The resources used to produce these trained personnel include labor, primarily in the form of enlisted instructors, and capital, largely composed of barracks, but also including classrooms and other buildings, as well as training equipment. The purpose of the study is to determine the output capability, or capacity, of the Navy's initial entry training bases under current and alternative operating policies, as well as under various output requirements associated with alternative force levels
Case studies in reserve component volunteerism : a composite battalion task force for the U.S. Army element of the Multinational Force and Observers mission, Sinai by John R Brinkerhoff( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This is one of a series of case studies prepared to illustrate how volunteerism has been used to gain access to National Guard and Reserve capabilities in support of recent military operations. The case studies have been prepared by reference to official documents and reports and interviews with unit members and other persons involved in the operation. This study tells about the special composite battalion task force the U.S. Army formed as part of the Multinational Force and Observers mission in the Sinai Desert. The battalion is comprised of active Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve personnel. Thus far, no major problems have been encountered and it is likely that a well-trained, fairly cohesive unit will result from the long and costly process. This case study serves as an example of how volunteer reservists can be used to accomplish an Army mission in situations where time is available for deliberate planning and lengthy preparations. This case study is a background paper for a report on the role of volunteerism in Reserve accession policy being prepared for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs
Simulators and enhanced training by Stanley A Horowitz( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this paper we discuss simulators and training devices in the overall context of training and show how their cost-effectiveness might be quantified. The paper discusses current DoD policies on training and simulation and briefly describes existing practice. The paper summarizes selected cost- effectiveness analyses from research literature comparing simulators and training devices with actual equipment and operations, reinterprets some of the data behind these analyses, and collects additional cost information. The results of this examination suggest that all major existing training options have value and that large changes in the simulator mix should not be made suddenly. However, on the margin, additional simulators and training devices are affordable, and in many situations appear to be cost-effective relative to actual equipment and operations. The analyses are not conclusive due to incomplete data. Recommendations are made on how to develop additional information
Case studies in reserve component volunteerism : the 175th Fighter Group, Maryland National Guard, over Bosnia by John R Brinkerhoff( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This is one of a series of case studies prepared to illustrate how volunteerism has been used to gain access to National Guard and Reserve capabilities in suppon of recent military operations. The case studies have been prepared by reference to official documents and repons and interviews with unit members and other persons involved in the operation. For two months in 1994, the 175th Fighter Group, Maryland Air National Guard, formed a Rainbow Detachment based at Aviano Air Base, Italy, as part of Operation Deny Flight, a NATO mission to monitor compliance with the UN ban on flights over Bosnia-Herzegovina. The 175th Rainbow Detachment's mission was to fly A- 10 missions in support of NATO's peacekeeping operations. The most noteworthy mission was a real attack on a Bosnian Serb tank. The report recounts the attack and makes observations about the course of the otherwise routine operation. This case study is a background paper for a report on the role of volunteerism in Reserve accession policy being prepared for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs
Case Studies in Reserve Component Volunteerism: The 258th Quartermaster Supply Company( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is one of a series of case studies prepared to illustrate how volunteerism has been used to gain access to National Guard and Reserve capabilities in support of recent military operations. The case studies have been prepared by reference to official documents and reports and interviews with unit members and other persons involved in the operation. This case study tells about the participation of the 258th Quartermaster Supply Company, Illinois Army National Guard, in the Humanitarian Support Unit Program of Operation Standard Bearer. The concept calls for company members to voluntary serve in active-duty status to provide 45 days of humanitarian assistance overseas. Whether the members voluntarily go on active duty when the need arises is crucial to the success of this program. The paper reviews the company's readiness for deployment in terms of personnel strength and composition and willingness to volunteer. It also explores the problems created by the need for the volunteers to sign agreements that they will volunteer and the importance of unit integrity and recognition. This case study is a background paper for a report on the role of volunteerism in Reserve accession policy being prepared for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs
Combat risk and pay : theory and some evidence by Simon Curtis( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Because U.S. military personnel currently receive $225 Hostile Fire Pay/Imminent Danger Pay (HFP/IDP) per month for serving in a combat zone, independent of the level of combat risk, servicemembers who face low levels of risk may be overcompensated. However, because overall compensation must be sufficient to attract volunteers who undertake high levels of risk, it is appropriate to examine the relationship between combat risk and total cash compensation. Using data on enlisted personnel for the period 2003-2009, we estimated that an increase in risk of death of one per thousand personnel was associated with an additional $551 per person in annual compensation. Quadratic estimates reveal that compensation increases in combat risk at a decreasing rate, even when the model is estimated separately for individuals who should have similar preferences toward combat risk. However, when the relationship between compensation and risk was estimated using data only on combat zone observations, the relationship was smaller, statistically less precise, and often negative."
 
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