WorldCat Identities

Champion, K. S. W.

Overview
Works: 48 works in 108 publications in 1 language and 583 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Observations 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by K. S. W Champion
The Terrestrial upper atmosphere : proceedings of workshop II of the COSPAR twenty-fourth plenary meeting held in Ottawa, Canada, 16 May-2nd June 1982 by COSPAR( Book )

8 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ARDC model atmosphere, 1959 by R. A Minzner( Book )

6 editions published between 1956 and 1959 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tides in the thermosphere : a review by J. M Forbes( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A comprehensive review of recent theoretical and observational accomplishments relating to diurnal and semidiurnal tidal oscillations of neutral winds, temperature, density, and composition above 100 km is presented. Topics emphasized include: Recent theoretical studies; Solar cycle, seasonal, and latitudinal variations in tidal oscillations of temperature and winds as inferred from Thomson scatter measurements; Tidal variations in total mass density and composition as inferred from satellite accelerometer and mass spectrometer measurements; Comparison of recent theoretical models with the above observations; The relative influence of in situ and propagating tides in determining the total semidiurnal thermospheric tide; and Propagating tides of lower atmosphere origin as a source of mean momentum and heat in the lower thermosphere
Early years of Air Force geophysics research contributing to internationally recognized standard and reference atmospheres by K. S. W Champion( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ionization gauge measurements of atmospheric density from a low altitude satellite by J. P McIsaac( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Results obtained from an Air Force Satellite launched in the fourth quarter of 1974 are presented. Ionization gauge measurements of atmospheric density were performed, and the values obtained from these measurements are presented in two appendices in the form of density vs altitude and time plots. The method of data reduction its application is developed and discussed. The reduction technique differs from previously used techniques in that it is more suitable for the processing of large data files such as those obtained from satellite flights, as well as featuring a lessened dependence upon attitude determination. The experiment is also described and the theory of operation is given. (Author)
Falling sphere measurements of atmospheric density, temperature, and pressure, up to 115 km. by K. S. W Champion( Book )

3 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Newly developed airborne instrumentation has made it posssible to extend the measurements of atmospheric density, temperature and pressure from the previous upper limit of 90 km to 115 km by means of the 7-inch rigid sphere method. A brief description of the instrumentation is given. Results of four rocket-borne experiments launched at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, in November 1963 and February 1964 are presented and compared with the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962, and a winter atmosphere for 30 degrees latitude. (Author)
Variations with season and latitude of density, temperature, and composition in the lower thermosphere by K. S. W Champion( Book )

4 editions published in 1967 in English and Undetermined and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of neutral density data has made it possible to extend curves of mean density as a function of latitude and season from 90 to 120 km. There is an approximate isopycnic point at 91 km. Above this point the density variations are reversed from what they are at 80 km. In other words, at 120 km the density in summer and at the tropics is lower than that in CIRA 1965 and in winter the density is higher. The density curves have been idealized near 120 km to join at one of three points. These correspond to typical summer and tropical conditions, winter conditions, and spring/autumn conditions. The summer density is 20 percent below that of the U.S. Standard, the winter density is 50 percent above the Standard and the spring/autumn density is 1 percent above the Standard. By application of appropriate theory the corresponding variations in temperature and mean molecular weight have been calculated. An unexpected result of the theory is the prediction of a seasonal variation of the mean molecular weight. Some of the data presented in the paper have been analyzed since the models were derived. These data have been found to be acceptably close to the models. (Author)
Dynamics and structure of the quiet thermosphere by K. S. W Champion( Book )

5 editions published in 1974 in English and Undetermined and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The COSPAR International Reference Atmospheres (CIRA) 1972 provides both a Mean International Reference Atmosphere of the thermosphere and a parametric set of models for the region. The models are based on knowledge of the thermosphere as of mid 1971. The differences in the diurnal variations of atmospheric density scale height obtained from satellite drag studies and temperatures obtained from incoherent radar scatter observations are probably due to different diurnal variations of density and temperature and not due to systematic discrepancies in the measurements. The answer to this question should be provided by data obtained from recently launched satellites ESRO IV, AEROS, and AE-C. The second major area of interest involves the absolute number densities and variations with time of day, latitude, and season of the major and minor constituents of the thermosphere. Recent data obtained with mass spectrometers and optical instruments are reviewed in addition to the results of theoretical composition calculations, which include turbulence and other transport effects
U.S. supplementary atmospheres by K. S. W Champion( Book )

4 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A radical new set of model atmospheres was prepared which represent typical atmospheric conditions for summer and winter at various latitudes up to 60 deg and which above 120 km are also functions of time of day and solar flux. These atmospheres connect at 80 km with Cole and Kantor's winter atmospheres for 30, 45, and 60 deg latitude, with their tropical atmosphere for 15 deg latitude and with their summer atmospheres for 30, 45, and 60 deg latitude. The three winter atmospheres merge at a common point at 120 km, with a density 50 percent above U.S. Standard 1962. The three summer atmospheres, plus the tropical atmosphere, merge at 120 km, with a density 20 percent below the U.S. Standard. In addition, a mean atmosphere has been prepared between 80 and 120 km which, in effect, constitutes a revision of the Standard. This atmosphere represents an average over all conditions, but also can be used for spring and fall at latitudes of 30 deg and higher. Each atmosphere has been calculated with a value of the acceleration due to gravity appropriate to the latitude. Starting from the three common points at 120 km are three sets of atmospheres. Each set consists of a number of atmospheres corresponding to exospheric temperatures lying between 600 and 2100K. At the higher altitudes, the seasonal dependence disappears and the variation is diurnal and with solar flux. These atmospheres are calculated using the acceleration due to gravity for a latitude of 45 deg. (Author)
New model atmospheres giving latitudinal and seasonal variations in the thermosphere by K. S. W Champion( Book )

4 editions published in 1967 in English and Undetermined and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A set of model atmospheres was prepared which constitutes a major advance in the representation of systematic variations in atmospheric properties between 120 and 250 km. The new models have three sets of boundary conditions at 120 km, which represent idealized variations with season and latitude, and connect with the new low altitude models which are a function of season and latitude. The three sets of high altitude models merge into one set above about 250 km. This set is identical with Jacchia's latest models and is a function of the usual parameters, including time of day, solar flux and geomagnetic index. The new models appear to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The theory predicts variations in the number densities of the individual constituents. An unexpected result is the prediction that the ratios of the constituents (such as O to O2) also vary, even at the boundary altitude
Space research IX; proceedings of Open Meetings of Working Groups of the Eleventh Plenary Meeting of COSPAR, Tokyo, 9-21 May 1968 by COSPAR( Book )

9 editions published in 1969 in English and Undetermined and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mean atmospheric properties in the range 30 to 300 km by K. S. W Champion( Book )

2 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Atmospheric structure in the lower thermosphere by K. S. W Champion( Book )

2 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This review constitutes a revision and up-dating of the report, Atmospheric Structure and its Variations in the Lower Thermosphere (AD-417 201). It has been prepared for inclusion as an appendix in the proposed new edition of the COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). New density data presented and discussed include the results of four falling-sphere density measurements made at White Sands, New Mexico, and densities deduced from drag effects on Explorer XVII and other satellites. The satellite density data is compared with the predictions of several models of Jacchia and Harris and Priester. Temperature data include revised values deduced by Blamont from Doppler broadening of sodium and potassium resonance lines. The new values are in better agreement with theoretical models than the earlier results. Recent composition results include number densities of O2, N2 and O calculated from ultraviolet absorption measurements by Hinteregger, and values of mean molecular mass from Explorer XVII and the rocket measurements of Nier and Schaefer. (Author)
Atmospheric structure and its variations in the lower thermosphere by K. S. W Champion( Book )

2 editions published in 1963 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Satellite density measurements with the rotatable calibration accelerometer (ROCA) by Frank A Marcos( Book )

3 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Satellite accelerometer measurements of atmospheric density have provided significant improvement in our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the lower thermosphere. Derivation of accurate data with this technique requires removal of instrument bias from the total sensor output. The ROCA (Rotatable Calibration Accelerometer) experiment was flown to provide and orbital calibration capability on the three-axis stabilized S3-4 satellite. The ROCA sensitive axis could be operated in either of two orientations selectable by ground command. For density measurement (normal operating mode) the sensitive axis was aligned with the satellite velocity vector. For direct measurement of bias, the sensitive axis was aligned perpendicular to the velocity vector. Utilization of the inflight calibration technique showed a dependence of the bias upon the instrument operating temperature. Removal of the bias-temperature component from the total acceleration signal obtained in the normal operating mode permits derivation of accurate density data. Measurements of atmospheric density were obtained during approximately 600 orbits over a five month period. The resulting ROCA data will be utilized for improved satellite ephemeris computations and for detailed studies of the lower thermosphere, particularly those related to energy inputs at high latitudes. (Author)
A new mean reference atmosphere for 25 to 500 km by K. S. W Champion( Book )

2 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The model was prepared as part of the activities of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) panel on new reference atmospheres. It will be published as 'The Mean COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere 1972.' The reference atmospheres aid in the design of aircraft, missiles and satellites. The Mean Atmosphere, provided for the altitude range 25 to 500 km, contains tables of temperature, density, and pressure for the whole range. Composition (major constituents and some minor constituents) is given for the range 75 to 500 km. The model represents mean annual and solar cycle conditions for latitudes near 30 degrees. (Author)
Atmospheric density variations in the Southern Hemisphere at low satellite altitudes by F. A Marcos( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Accurate density measurements are required to develop predictive atmospheric models. Of particular concern is the altitude region below 250 km. Few measurements are presently available in this region and data are urgently required by the Air Force for accurate ephemeris, trajectory, and reentry predictions. Profiles of neutral atmospheric density obtained at low satellite altitudes in the southern hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet conditions are described in this report
Densities from satellites OV1-15 and OV1-16 by K. S. W Champion( Book )

4 editions published in 1969 in English and Undetermined and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objectives of satellites OV1-16 (Cannon Ball I) and OV1-15 (SPADES) were to measure atmospheric density and related properties in the lower thermosphere with particular emphasis on the altitude region 120 to 150 km. This region is where least data are available and where data are urgently required for Air Force Systems vehicles and for accurate calculations of the re- entry locations of satellites. To achieve an orbit at the lowest possible altitude the mass-to-area ratio of Cannon Ball I was maximized and a spherical shape chosen to optimize the accuracy of the drag density measurements. Both satellites were launched into a polar orbit on 11 July 1968. The initial perigee of Cannon Ball I was 148 km and the apogee 575 km. The initial perigee for SPADES was 158 km and the apogee 1850 km. A considerable amount of density data was obtained from orbital drag and from an onboard triaxial accelerometer on Cannon Ball I and from orbital drag, accelerometer, and ionization gauges on SPADES
Densities from satellites 0V1-15 and 0V1-16 by K. S. W Champion( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Champion, Kenneth S.W.

Languages
English (68)