WorldCat Identities

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Idaho Operations Office

Overview
Works: 540 works in 831 publications in 1 language and 4,156 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: QE75,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by U.S. Atomic Energy Commission
Hydrologic conditions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho : 1979-1981 update by Barney D Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final report of SL-1 recovery operation by General Electric Company( )

2 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In May, 1961, it waa determined no renewed nuclear reaction in the SL-1 pressure vessel was possible as long as water was excluded. It was therefore possible to proceed with the final phase of the SL-1 recovery. This work consisted of moving the pressure vessel and core to the Hot Shop at the north end of the National Reactor Testing Station, dissecting and analyzing the reactor and its components, cutting up and burying the reactor building, and decontaminating the rest of the SL-1 area. These things were accomplished by the General Electric Company between May 1961 and July 1962. It was determined that the central control rod was bound in its shroud at a position corresponding to 20- inch withdrawal. Analysis of the pertinent data showed that the amount of reactivity associated with this rod position, inserted at a rate compatihie with manual withdrawal of the rod, can explain the significant evidence which was coliected. No other means of withdrawing the rod was found to be in accordance with the evidence. It was found that the relatively low yield (130 Mw-sec) nuclear excursion produced a water hammer with pressures up to 10,000 psi, which, in turn, caused the pressure vessel to rise some 9 feet in the air. (auth)
A summary report on ML-1 fuel element development in-pile test history by George L Vivian( )

2 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Laboratory development of a process for separating barium-140 from MTR fuel by Edward L Anderson( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

S>The results of all laboratory research and development on the process for separation of barium-140 from MTR fuel elements are presented. The steps include caustic dissolution separation of barium and strontium with fuming nitric acid and removal of strontium by the chromate-acetate method. The results of laboratory and pilot plant corrosion investigations and high radiation level flowsheet tests in the Multicurie Cell are also included. (auth)
Chemical processing technology quarterly progress report( )

in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary x-ray investigations of the hydrates of zirconium tetrafluoride by R. L Wells( )

2 editions published in 1958 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the studies of the dissolution of uranium -zirconium
A gelatin-filtration headend for fuel reprocessing solutions from silicon-containing aluminum alloys by B. J Newby( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A laboratory study of a gelatin headend process for feed from silicon- containing aluminum fuels and plant salvage solutions is described. The optimum conditions for the gelatin treatment of fuel solutions were to boil a 0.1 to 0.5N nitric acid solution with 100 milligrams of gelatin per liter for 30 minutes. This treatment improved filtration rates and decreased the surface activity of the filtrate for TBP extraction. A number of possible flowsheets for fuel solutions are presented using gelatin treatment and filtration. An adequate treatment was not found for salvage solutions of unknown composition because a gelatin dosage which was satisfactory for all solutions could not be selected. The optimum treatment for a salvage solution which was grossly contaminated with zirconium, soluble and colloidal silica, and dibutyl phosphate was to boil a 1N acid deficient solution with 600 milligrams of gelatin per liter, filter, and use a Hexone extraction system. A silicic colloid in fuel processing solutions was characterized as a surface active material by this study. (auth)
Analytical program for processing stainless steel uranium dioxide reactor fuel elements by George A Huff( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analytical programs have been described for uranium recovery processes for aluminum-uranium and zirconiumuranium reactor fuel elements. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the analytical program for the uranium recovery process involving stainless steel-uranium reactor fuel elements. The recovery process consists of a two step dissolution and the regular liquid-liquid solvent extraction using TBP in kerosene. Sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the stainless steel. As a result of the sulfuric acid dissolution the uranium is converted to a slurry. The uranium slurry is then dlssolved in nitric acid. After the nitric acid dissolution the feed material is compatible with the extraction columns used at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant for other type fuel elements previously described. In order to analyze samples of dissolver solutions for constituents necessary for plant operation, three new analytical methods were developed. These methods are a rapid method for determining uranium, one for nitrate and one for sulfate. Methods are described for urarium, acidity, specific gravity, nitrate, and sulfate in the dissolver solution; also for small amounts of uranium in the extraction column raffinates. Samples of dissolver solution and first cycle aqueous raffinate contain large amounts of fission products. These samples require shielded facilities for analytical work. The remote analytical facility described by Dykes and his co-workers was used for this work. Precision and accuracy data are given for the analytical methods described. (auth)
Mechanism of electroreduction of chromic ion at the mercury cathode by Milton E McLain( )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The mechanism of reduction for chromium(III) ion to chromium(II) at the mercury cathode was studied in 0.1M KNO/sub 3/. Data obtained at varying temperature and solution composition from polarograms gave values for DELTA H*, DELTA S*, and DELTA F* which indicated that two mechanisms were involved. At potentials more positive than the polarographic half-wave potential, the mechanism appeared to be simple electron transfer from the electrode to the chromium(III) ion in solution. When the potential was more negative than the half-wave, potential electron exchange between the reduced chromium ion near the electrode surface and a chromium(III) ion in solution became appreciable. Values for the heat of activation for the reduction of chromium(III) to chromium(II) in 0.1M KNO/sub 3/ for the electron transfer and exchange reaction mechanisms were determined to be 34.7 and 27.0 kcal mole/sup -1/, respectively. (auth)
Characterization of surfactants in aluminum-uranium fuel reprocessing solutions by R. D Cannon( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Surface active materials in aluminum nitrate-nitric acid fuel reprocessing solutions were characterized. Polymerized silica, zirconium- modified silica and soluble dibutyl phosphate species were found to contribute to stable emulsion formation. These surfactants were reduced in effectiveness by added acid. (auth)
The effect of silicon in the reprocessing of a uranium aluminum alloy by K. L Rohde( )

2 editions published in 1958 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The insoluble residues produced during the reprocessing of certain nuclear fuel elements containing aluminum, silicon, and uranium were investigated with respect to particle size, shape and distribution, composition, and surface- active tendencies. The fuel material samples studied contained from 0.4 to 7.0% silicon by weight (the high analysis represents a cast base AlSi alloy). The fuel materials were dissolved in mercury-catalyzed nitric acid. Two types of solid residue were produced by actual fuel dissolution. One was a finely divided material, brown in color and the other was black, crystalline material relatively large in size. Only the black crystalline material was obtained when cast AlSi was dissolved in nitric acid. Spectrographic analysis of the residues showed that silicon and alumimum were the major constituents. X-ray diffraction analysis of each type indicated the presence of elemental silicon only. The x- ray pattern obtained with the brown material showed lower intensities indicating the presence of amorphous material. Under a magnification of 970 diametems, the crystals observed appeared to be non-uniform, shallow platelets of irregular shape. The bulk of the residue is remmed by a 10-micron filter: however, the resulting filtration rates are very low. (2.0 gallons per hour per square foot). Sedimentation data of typical dissolver solution showed that about 20% of the silicon particles have equivalent diameters of 20 mu or greater, that 25% have equivalent dismeters between 10 and 20 mu and the remaining have equivalent diameters of less than 10 mu . Dispersioncoalescence data disclosed minor surface active tendencies which appear to be insufficient to cause unusual extraction column operation. The particle size, distribution and surface-active tendenciess were not affected by aging. (auth)
Quarterly technical report, STEP Project( )

in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The determination of excessive emulsification by coalescence behavior measurements by O. W Parrett( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The development of a remotely operated device for determining the coalescence times of plant process streams suspected of containing surfactants such as silicic compounds and fission product zirconium compounds is described
Isotopic analysis of boron as trimethyl borate by R. M Abernathey( )

2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Boron-impregnated polyethylene tape was irradiated in the Engineering Test Reactor Critical Facility to study the effect of boron as a burnable poison in reactor fuel. Isotopic analysis of the boron was performed with a conventional CEC Model 21-103 mass spectrometer. The tape was distilled off and the residual boron was converted to trimethyl borate. The reaction mixture was analyzed without separation. Good precision was obtained with samples containing less than 0.5 mg. boron. Features of the mass spectrum of trimethyl borate are discussed. Other applications of the method are suggested. (auth)
The solubility of zirconium tetrafluoride in nitric acid from 0 to 80° C by A. G Chapman( )

2 editions published in 1958 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corrosion of alloys in various ICPP decontamination solutions by T. L Hoffman( )

2 editions published in 1961 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corrosion studies were conducted on stainless steel types 347 and Carpenter-20, Monel, titanium 55A, and tsntalum in decontamination solutions. These solutions are: 10% nitric acid, 10% citric acid, 10% sodium hydroxide--2.5% tartaric acid, 10% oxalic acid, 0.003M periodic acid in 0.05M nitric acid, 3% sodium fluoride --20% nitric acid, Turco 4501 and Turco 4502, and 0.25M phosphoric acid. Boron stainless steel type 304L was studied in 10% sodium hydroxide--2.5% tartaric acid, 10 and 60% nitric acids, Turco 4501 and Turco 4502. The two austenitic stainless steels were found to be acceptable construction materials for handling each of the decontamination solutions except 3% sodium fluoride--20% nitric acid. Special limitations are defined for Monel, titanium 55A, and tantalum when exposed to decontamination reagents. (auth)
Determination of aluminum in presence of fluoride, zirconium, and uranium by Bernice E Paige( )

2 editions published in 1955 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Controlled environmental radioiodine tests at the National Reactor Testing Station( )

2 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Experimental investigations of reactor transients( )

2 editions published in 1956 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Salt-phase chlorination of reactor fuels by H. T Hahn( )

2 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.75 (from 0.54 for Hydrologic ... to 0.95 for MTR techni ...)

Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States. Energy Research and Development Administration. Idaho Operations Office

United States. Atomic Energy Commission. Idaho Operations Office

Languages
English (64)