WorldCat Identities

MacDonald, Dennis Ronald 1946-

Overview
Works: 48 works in 199 publications in 3 languages and 8,757 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Conference papers and proceedings  Controversial literature 
Roles: Author, Editor, Author of introduction, Other, Translator
Classifications: BS2880.A372, 229.92
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Dennis Ronald MacDonald
Does the New Testament imitate Homer? : four cases from the Acts of the Apostles by Dennis R MacDonald( )

16 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 1,874 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Christianizing Homer : the Odyssey, Plato, and the Acts of Andrew by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( )

17 editions published between 1994 and 2011 in English and held by 1,758 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While traditional scholarship has looked to Jewish and Christian scriptures for the background of such writings, MacDonald turns instead to Greek classics for the literary inspirations of this story. He argues that the Acts represent an attempt to transform Greco-Roman myth into Christian legends that substitute Christian virtues for the vices of characters in classical Greek literature, in particular the Odyssey. Presenting a point-by-point comparison of the two works, he finds the resemblances so strong, numerous, and tendentious that they virtually compel the reader to consider the Acts a transformative "rewriting" of the epic. The author found justification for this transformation in Plato's denunciations of Homer - at the end of the work, Andrew plays the role of a Christianized Socrates
Two shipwrecked gospels : the logoi of Jesus and Papias's exposition of logia about the Lord by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( )

19 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 1,549 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With characteristic boldness and a creative look at long-neglected evidence, MacDonald offers an alternative reconstruction of Q and an alternative solution to the Synoptic Problem: the Q+/Papias Hypothesis. To do so, he reconstructs and interprets two lost books about Jesus: the earliest Gospel, which was used as a source by the authors of Mark, Matthew, and Luke; and the earliest commentary on the Gospels, by Papias of Hierapolis, who apparently knew Mark, Matthew, and the lost Gospel, which he considered to be an alternative Greek translation of a Semitic Matthew. MacDonald also explores how these two texts, well known into the fourth century, vanished in the shipwrecks of canonization and errant eschatology
The Homeric epics and the Gospel of Mark by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

11 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and held by 543 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this book, Dennis R. MacDonald offers a new view of the New Testament gospel of Mark. The author of the earliest gospel was not writing history, nor was he merely recording tradition, MacDonald argues. Close reading and careful analysis show that Mark borrowed extensively from the Odyssey and the Iliad and that he wanted his readers to recognize the Homeric antecedents in Mark's story of Jesus, Mark was composing a prose anti-epic, MacDonald says, presenting Jesus as a suffering hero modeled after but far superior to traditional Greek heroes."--Jacket
The legend and the Apostle : the battle for Paul in story and canon by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

8 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 504 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mythologizing Jesus : from Jewish teacher to epic hero by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 292 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dennis MacDonald shows how Gospel stories parallel many Greek and Roman epics from walking on water to visiting the land of the dead to compel first-century readers into life-changing decisions to follow Jesus. MacDonald doesn t call into question the existence of Jesus but rather asks readers to examine the Gospels through a new, mythological lens
Mimesis and intertextuality in antiquity and Christianity( Book )

7 editions published between 2001 and 2006 in English and held by 280 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Luke and Vergil : imitations of classical Greek literature by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( )

9 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 277 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These two volumes are the magnum opus of biblical scholar Dennis R. MacDonald, outlining the profound connections between the New Testament and classical Greek poetry. MacDonald argues that the Gospel writers borrowed from established literary sources to create stories about Jesus that readers of the day would find convincing
There is no male and female : the fate of a dominical saying in Paul and gnosticism by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

12 editions published between 1986 and 1987 in English and held by 271 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Acts of Andrew and the Acts of Andrew and Matthias in the city of the cannibals by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

7 editions published in 1990 in 3 languages and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Dionysian gospel : the fourth gospel and Euripides by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( )

4 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them." Dennis R. MacDonald offers a provocative explanation of those scandalous words of Christ from the Fourth Gospel--an explanation that he argues would hardly have surprised some of the Gospel's early readers. John sounds themes that would have instantly been recognized as proper to the Greek god Dionysos (the Roman Bacchus), not least as he was depicted in Euripides's play The Bacchae. A divine figure, the offspring of a divine father and human mother, takes on flesh to live among mortals, but is rejected by his own. He miraculously provides wine and offers it as a sacred gift to his devotees, women prominent among them, dies a violent death--and returns to life. Yet John takes his drama in a dramatically different direction: while Euripides's Dionysos exacts vengeance on the Theban throne, the Johannine Christ offers life to his followers. MacDonald employs mimesis criticism to argue that the earliest Evangelist not only imitated Euripides but expected his readers to recognize Jesus as greater than Dionysos
The gospels and Homer : imitations of Greek epic in Mark and Luke-Acts by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( Book )

9 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 177 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In The Gospels and Homer MacDonald leads readers through Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, highlighting models that the authors of the Gospel of Mark and Luke-Acts may have imitated for their portrayals of Jesus and his earliest followers such as Paul. The book applies mimesis criticism to show the popularity of the targets being imitated, the distinctiveness in the Gospels, and evidence that ancient readers recognized these similarities. Using side-by-side comparisons, the book provides English translations of Byzantine poetry that shows how Christian writers used lines from Homer to retell the life of Jesus. The potential imitations include adventures and shipwrecks, savages living in cages, meals for thousands, transfigurations, visits from the dead, blind seers, and more. MacDonald makes a compelling case that the Gospel writers successfully imitated the epics to provide their readers with heroes and an authoritative foundation for Christianity."--
Delightful Acts : new essays on canonical and non-canonical Acts by Harold W Attridge( Book )

8 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Publisher's description: The primary impetus of this collection of essays on canonical and non-canonical Acts is to honor the scholarly achievements of Richard I. Pervo. Pervo pioneered the view that canonical Acts is comparable to ancient fiction, insofar as the various episodes about Peter, Paul and the other apostles were composed to entertain, even as they inform. In the spirit of this work, contributors to this volume do not sit idly by. Prodding and provoking readers, these new and often exploratory essays travel at di;erent speeds and with notable variation from center within the broad orbit of canonical Acts. The hope is that this volume will foster serious conversation of the things discussed, with no small measure of delight along the way
The Apocryphal Acts of Apostles( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The intertextuality of the Epistles : explorations of theory and practice( Book )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Acts of Andrew( Book )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Five major apocryphal Acts survive from the early period of the Christian church, the so-called Acts of Andrew, of Paul, Peter, John, and Thomas. In the canonical New Testament, the apostle Andrew, brother of Peter is mentioned only a dozen times. In The Acts of Andrew, his post-resurrection mission and heroic martyrdom are closely detailed in a series of acts of episodes. This study edition of The Acts of Andrew presents a fresh, new translation of the text with cross-references, notes, and commentary. An extensive introduction also sets out the challenge of recovering and reconstructing the original text."--Jacket
The Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles in intertextual perspectives( Book )

6 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jesus in Q : the Sabbath and theology of the Bible and extracanonical texts by Ky-Chun So( Book )

4 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"'Jesus in Q' is about the Sabbath and the theology of Jesus. There are several books about the Sabbath with regard to the Gospel of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, but nothing regarding Q. This book is designed to address the relation to the Sabbath in Q which makes it remarkable amongst other Sabbath related books with reference to the Synoptic Gospels. Considering the rabbinic writers and the early fathers, who have used, generally in a free way, the sayings of Jesus drawn from the Gospels and/or oral tradition, this book examines the apologists and the extracanonical writers, whose writings constitute a well-defined literary genre and witness a progressively more bookish use of the sayings of Jesus. This book understands the extracanonical documents in early Judaism as a prerequisite for understanding the appearances of Jesus." --
Luke and the politics of Homeric imitation : Luke-Acts as rival to the Aeneid by Dennis Ronald MacDonald( )

4 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Luke and the Politics of Homeric Imitation: Luke-Acts as Rival to the Aeneid argues that the author of Luke-Acts composed not a history but a foundation mythology to rival Vergil's Aeneid by adopting and ethically emulating the cultural capital of classical Greek poetry, especially Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Euripides's Bacchae. For example, Vergil and, more than a century later, Luke both imitated Homer's account of Zeus's lying dream to Agamemnon, Priam's escape from Achilles, and Odysseus's shipwreck and visit to the netherworld. Both Vergil and Luke, as well as many other intellectuals in the Roman Empire, engaged the great poetry of the Greeks to root new social or political realities in the soil of ancient Hellas, but they also rivaled Homer's gods and heroes to create new ones that were more moral, powerful, or compassionate. One might say that the genre of Luke-Acts is an oxymoron: a prose epic. If this assessment is correct, it holds enormous importance for understanding Christian origins, in part because one may no longer appeal to the Acts of the Apostles for reliable historical information. Luke was not a historian any more than Vergil was, and, as the Latin bard had done for the Augustine age, he wrote a fictional portrayal of the kingdom of God and its heroes, especially Jesus and Paul, who were more powerful, more ethical, and more compassionate than the gods and heroes of Homer and Euripides or those of Vergil's Aeneid
Christian origins and the New Testament in the Greco-Roman context : essays in honor of Dennis R. MacDonald( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Christianizing Homer : the Odyssey, Plato, and the Acts of Andrew
Covers
The Homeric epics and the Gospel of MarkThe legend and the Apostle : the battle for Paul in story and canonMimesis and intertextuality in antiquity and ChristianityThe Acts of Andrew and the Acts of Andrew and Matthias in the city of the cannibalsThe intertextuality of the Epistles : explorations of theory and practiceActs of Andrew
Alternative Names
Dennis MacDonald American theologian

Dennis MacDonald Amerikaans theoloog

Mac Donald, Dennis Ronald

Mac Donald Dennis Ronald 1946-....

MacDonald, Dennis

MacDonald, Dennis R.

MacDonald Dennis R. 1946-....

MacDonald, Dennis R. 1948-

Mc Donald, Dennis Ronald

Mc Donald Dennis Ronald 1946-....

McDonald, Dennis R. 1946-

McDonald, Dennis Ronald

McDonald Dennis Ronald 1946-....

Languages
English (155)

Latin (1)

Armenian (1)