WorldCat Identities

Erdman, John W.

Overview
Works: 45 works in 87 publications in 3 languages and 1,015 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Other, Author
Classifications: TX353, 617.481044
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by John W Erdman
Nutrition and traumatic brain injury : improving acute and subacute health outcomes in military personnel by Institute of Medicine (U.S.)( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for up to one-third of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to some estimates. TBI is also a major problem among civilians, especially those who engage in certain sports. At the request of the Department of Defense, the IOM examined the potential role of nutrition in the treatment of and resilience against TBI."--Publisher's website
Present knowledge in nutrition by John W Erdman( Book )

13 editions published in 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 224 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 10th edition, provides comprehensive coverage of all aspects of human nutrition in a single volume, including micronutrients, systems biology, immunity, public health, international nutrition, and the role of diet in disease prevention. This definitive reference captures the current state of this vital and dynamic science from an international perspective. This 10th edition contains new chapters on topics such as epigenetics, metabolomics, and sports nutrition. The remaining chapters have been thoroughly updated to reflect recent developments. --from back cover
Nutrient interactions( Book )

11 editions published in 1988 in English and Undetermined and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Food science and nutritional health : an introduction by Theodore Peter Labuza( Book )

4 editions published between 1984 and 1987 in English and held by 183 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease : proceedings from a symposium held in Mesa, Arizona, on February 20-23, 1994 by International Symposium on the Role of Soy in Preventing and Treating Chronic Disease( Book )

4 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nutrición y dieta en la prevención de enfermedades( Book )

5 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in Spanish and English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chocolate : modern science investigates an ancient medicine : proceedings of the symposium held at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, February 19, 2000 in Washington, D.C. by American Society for the Advancement of Science( Book )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Present knowledge in nutrition( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1994 AIN symposium proceedings : American Institute of Nutrition annual meeting, April 24-28, 1994, Anaheim, California by American Institute of Nutrition( Book )

3 editions published between 1994 and 1995 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nutrición y dieta en la prevención de enfermedades (10a. ed.) by John W Erdman( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in Spanish and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Saishin eiyōgaku : Senmon ryōiki no saishin jōhō( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in Japanese and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Carotenoid metabolism in mice and prostate cancer risk by Nikki A Ford( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Protective potential of fruits against diabetes and its complications by Tristan F Kraft( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fruits have been increasingly studied for health-promoting properties and recent studies suggest that fruit compounds may provide protection against diabetes and its complications. Wild fruit species, Amelanchier alnifolia, Viburnum trilobum, Prunus virginiana, Shepherdia argentea, Vaccinium angustifolium, and Aristotelia chilensis, which have all been utilized by traditional cultures for sustenance and health, were evaluated for ability to protect against the development of diabetes and its complications. Fruits of these species were extracted and separated into fractions rich in different phytochemical classes
Enrichment of tomatoes and broccoli with specific bioactives for the reduction of prostate carcinogenesis by Ann G Liu( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Epidemiological studies have linked high consumption of tomatoes and cruciferous vegetables to decreased risk of prostate cancer. Several bioactive components isolated from cruciferous vegetables and tomatoes exhibit anti-cancer properties. Previous studies have evaluated the cancer preventive potential of these individual bioactives, but few have examined them within the context of a whole food. In a pilot study to evaluate bioactivity of different tomato and broccoli powders, male Copenhagen rats were fed diets containing 10% standard tomato powder, tomato enriched with lycopene or total carotenoids, standard broccoli floret, broccoli sprouts, or broccoli enriched with indole glucosinolates or selenium for 7 days. All broccoli diets increased activity of colon quinone reductase (NQO1). Indole glucosinolate-enriched broccoli and selenium-enriched broccoli increased hepatic NQO1 and cytochrome P450 1A activity (P <0.05). Different tomato diets resulted in altered hepatic accumulation of lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene. These results demonstrate that the bioactive content of vegetables affects both tissue content of bioactives and activity of detoxification enzymes. Enhancing bioactive content of tomatoes and broccoli may enhance efficacy in the prevention of prostate cancer. Based on the results of this pilot study, our next objective was to determine if standard broccoli or the indole glucosinolate-enriched (IG) broccoli, would impact prostate carcinogenesis in the aggressive TRAMP model. Male mice were randomized into 3 diet groups at 5-7 weeks of age: AIN-93G control, 10% control broccoli powder, or 10% IG broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age, with no differences in body weight or food intake observed between groups. There were no differences between groups in genitourinary tract weight, a surrogate marker of tumor volume, and no differences were found in cancer grade upon histopathologic evaluation indicating that broccoli feeding did not impact cancer aggressiveness. The horticultural manipulation of broccoli to alter phytochemical concentration is a feasible approach to optimizing the potential for cancer prevention, yet optimal patterns of phytochemicals remain to be characterized. To assess potential epigenetic effects of lycopene, we examined the effects of lycopene and its metabolite, apo-10⁰́₉-lycopenal, on methylation of the GSTP1 promoter in LNCaP cells. GSTP1 is hypermethylated in>90% of prostate cancers, which results in complete silencing of the gene. Neither lycopene nor apo-10⁰́₉-lycopenal altered mRNA expression or DNA methylation of GSTP1 indicating that lycopene is not an effective demethylating agent for this gene in this particular prostate cancer cell line. It remains to be seen if lycopene has epigenetic effects on other genes or in other cell lines. Overall we have demonstrated that the bioactive content of tomatoes and broccoli can be altered through agronomic means, but optimal profiles for cancer prevention remain to be determined. Much remains to be learned about how tomatoes and broccoli alter cancer progression at different stages and the mechanisms through which they exert their effects
Flavonoids and heart health : proceedings of the ILSI North America workshop, 2005( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Present knowledge in nutrition by Institut international des sciences de la vie( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 10th Edition provides comprehensive coverage of all aspects of human nutrition, including micronutrients, systems biology, immunity, public health, international nutrition, and diet and disease prevention. This definitive reference captures the current state of this vital and dynamic science from an international perspective, featuring nearly 140 expert authors from 14 countries around the world. Now condensed to a single volume, this 10th edition contains new chapters on topics such as epigenetics, metabolomics, and sp
Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories by Matthew P Thorpe( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

No clear consensus on the role of higher protein intakes has emerged, in spite of many decades of research. Protein unambiguously increases urinary calcium losses, which is completely attributable to the dietary acid load imposed by metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids into acid equivalents. Although alternate dietary sources of fixed acid cause demineralization of bone and apparent osteoporosis, this effect has not been consistently observed for protein, suggesting opposing, beneficial effects on bone. Specifically, protein may improve bone health through improving calcium absorption, increasing total circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 or by improving lean body mass which in turn increases bone growth. Although the notion of competing positive and negative pathways has been articulated theoretically, statistical mediation models of this ⁰́dual pathways⁰́₊ relationship have not been employed to quantify these relationships. In a cross-sectional investigation of postmenopausal women, protein intake is positively related to bone mineral density of the lumbar spine following adjustment for an accompanying negative effect mediated by the sulfur containing fraction of protein. In growing rats, an analogous and complementary pattern emerged: A negative association of protein intake with bone strength was suppressed by an opposing, positive effect of protein mediated by insulin-like growth factor 1. A second animal study assessed the influence of protein source on bone strength and bone mineral content of growing rats consuming isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diets. The influence of protein source was completely mediated by the corresponding changes in lean body mass. A randomized, controlled trial indicated a higher protein diet preserved bone density during weight loss compared to a conventional, MyPyramid based diet; however the protein diet also contained more calcium. A mathematical model of calcium availability in this trial suggested that this additional dietary calcium was not sufficient to explain differences in calcium accrual between groups unless calcium availability was also improved in the higher protein diet. Also, within this study, urine calcium (a surrogate of the diet acid load) exhibited a negative association with bone density change, in spite of its positive association with protein intake. The striking consistency of a dual pathway model across populations and experimental models lends credence to the notion that dietary protein may hold a positive or negative effect on bone health, depending on other factors in the diet. Specifically, we find support that the sulfur containing amino acid induced dietary acid load holds negative effects that may be opposed by positive influences of insulin-like growth factor 1, calcium availability or lean body mass. On average, this effect is probably null or too small to be of clinical importance. The effect may be of public health relevance, however, if the diet can be manipulated in order to uncouple positive and negative pathways. If correct, the dual pathway model predicts higher protein intakes will have modest benefits on bone health in the context of adequate calcium intake, selection of protein sources lower in sulfur amino acids or ample intake of fruits and vegetables to buffer the dietary acid load
 
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Nutrition and traumatic brain injury : improving acute and subacute health outcomes in military personnel
Covers
Nutrient interactions
Alternative Names
Erdman Jr., John W.

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