WorldCat Identities

Frazier, O. Howard

Overview
Works: 105 works in 124 publications in 1 language and 1,223 library holdings
Genres: Scientific atlases 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about O. Howard Frazier
 
Most widely held works by O. Howard Frazier
Techniques in cardiac surgery by Denton A Cooley( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 179 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mechanical circulatory support for advanced heart failure : a Texas Heart Institute/Baylor College of Medicine approach by Jeffrey A Morgan( )

7 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 151 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book provides the most up to date information on every aspect of clinical care relating to patients with advanced heart failure who require mechanical circulatory support as a treatment strategy. The book begins with an extensive description of the preoperative patient selection process as well as preoperative medical optimization, including bridge to bridge strategies with short-term devices. The book then transitions into a description of a variety of surgical implantation techniques with special considerations for reoperative surgery. A chapter on intraoperative anesthesia management is specifically focused on intraoperative issues relating to MCS patients. Subsequent chapters focus on perioperative management as well as long-term management of patients on MCS, including optimization of a patient’s LVAD speed. A dedicated chapter on the diagnosis of device thrombosis as well as surgical techniques and outcomes associated with device exchanges is also included. The book also summarizes the national and international outcomes data for using MCS as a bridge to transplant and destination therapy. There is also a chapter on the utility of stem cells as an adjunct technique for inducing myocardial recovery. Finally, the book has chapters on complications of MCS, management of right ventricular failure, and the future of MCS
Ischemic heart disease : surgical management( Book )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Support and replacement of the failing heart( Book )

5 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Minimally invasive esophageal surgery( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mechanical circulatory support( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clinical orthotopic cardiac transplantation( Visual )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Producer) Opening with a brief historical perspective of heart transplantation, this program depicts the current surgical technique with information on recipient and donor selection criteria and postoperative care
Surgical therapy for severe heart failure by O. Howard Frazier( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) : a bridge to life( Visual )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Producer) Describes the left ventricular assist device, demonstrates implantation, and identifies appropriate candidates
Innovations in the treatment of end-stage heart disease : partial-left ventriculectomy & the use of LVADs( Visual )

2 editions published between 2002 and 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program is designed for cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons involved in the care of patients with end-stage heart disease. This program features leading cardiologists and surgeons who will explore innovative approaches for dealing with patients with severe heart disease. The tape also includes footage from actual surgical procedures with step by step narration
Heart failure : pathogenesis and treatment( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clinical implantation of the "Heartmate" ventricular assist device( Visual )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Producer) The Heartmate, a totally implantable ventricular assist device, represents the latest development in the evolution of mechanical assist devices for use as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. This program presents the Texas Heart Institute's clinical experience with the device in long-term applications. Implantation times have ranged from 30 days to more than 200 days, with no episodes of thromboembolic events
Cardiac transplantation( Visual )

2 editions published between 1988 and 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Heterotopic ("piggyback") heart transplantation( Visual )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Producer) For the patient with end-stage cardiac failure who is unsuitable for orthotopic cardiac transplantation (primarily because of elevated pulmonary vascular resistance), this approach serves as a reliable treatment option. The surgical technique is also advantageous in situations wherein immediate treatment is necessary, but available allografts are undersized or hemodynamically suboptimal at the time of surgery
Assessment of arterial blood pressure during support with an axial flow left ventricular assist device( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background Axial-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have a number of advantages over pulsatile LVADs, including their small size and better durability. Although the design of axial-flow pumps should result in fewer serious complications during support, some adverse events persist. Thus, optimizing patient treatment may minimize complications, allowing broader acceptance of these devices. In this study, we analyzed standard blood pressure measurements obtained by cuff and arterial lines and used these values to help establish guidelines for the safe operation of axial-flow LVADs. Methods The study included 35 heart failure patients who had received a Jarvik 2000 (Jarvik Heart Inc, New York, NY) axial-flow LVAD as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. Blood pressure and echocardiographic data were collected during speed-change studies. Results Systolic blood pressure did not change, but diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure values changed significantly with changes in pump speed (p < 0.0001). When blood pressure values obtained from an arterial line were compared with those from an automated cuff machine, the systolic, diastolic, and mean values did not correlate (p < 0.05), but the calculated pulse pressures did (p = 0.33). A pulse pressure calculation of < 15 mm Hg resulted in aortic valve opening 24% of the time, and a pulse pressure > 15 mm Hg was predictive of aortic valve opening 65% of the time. Conclusions Because aortic valve opening minimizes the risk of complications, a safe zone for most patients is a pulse pressure > 15 mm Hg. Arterial blood pressure changes during axial-flow LVAD support can be predicted and may be used as a guide for the proper management of pump speed settings. A calculated pulse pressure from an arterial line or automated cuff may be used to determine a safe zone of Jarvik 2000 operation, leading to fewer complications
Orthotopic retransplantation in heterotopic transplant recipients : 3 case reports( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We report 3 patients who initially underwent heterotopic transplantation due to a size mismatch but then later underwent orthotopic retransplantation because of heart failure. In each case, the heterotopic graft was left in place, the native heart was removed, and the new allograft was placed orthotopically. This technique resulted in reduced postoperative morbidity andexcellent long-term outcomes
Initial clinical experience with the Jarvik 2000 implantable axial-flow left ventricular assist system( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVASs) are used for bridging to transplantation, bridging to myocardial improvement, and for permanent circulatory support. Conventional implantable systems have inherent limitations that increase morbidity during support. In contrast, small, efficient, axial-flow pumps, which have been under development for the past decade, have the potential to improve the length and quality of life in patients with severe heart failure. Methods and Results- To assess the safetyand clinical utility of the Jarvik 2000, we implanted this device in 10 transplant candidates (mean age 51.3 years) in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV. Implantation was achieved through a left thoracotomy during partial cardiopulmonary bypass. The mean support period was 84 days. Within 48hours postoperatively, the cardiac index increased 43%, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased 52%, systemic vascular resistance decreased significantly, and inotropic support became unnecessary. Eight patients underwent physical rehabilitation and returned to NYHA class I. Their left ventricular dimensions, cardiothoracic ratios, and pressure-volume loop analyses showed good left ventricular unloading. Seven patients underwent transplantation and 3 died during support. No device thrombosis was observed at explantation. Conclusions: The Jarvik 2000 functions as a true assist device by partially unloading the left ventricle, thereby optimizing the patient's hemodynamics. Our preliminary results indicate that this LVAS may safely provide circulatory assistance for heart transplant candidates
Salvage of infected left ventricular assist device with antibiotic beads( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: The use of left ventricular assist devices has become common for the treatment of end-stage heart failure, both as a bridge to transplantation and as destination therapy. The nature of these devices and the comorbid conditions of the patients in whom the devices are implanted lead to high rates of device infection that are related directly to mortality. Methods: Over 2 years, the senior author (S.A.I.) treated 26 patients with left ventricular assist device infections, ranging from superficial driveline infections to deeper pocket infections and device infections. An algorithm involving the use of repeated débridement and placement of antibiotic beads was used in treatment of these infections. Once cleared of infection, patients were treated with definitive closure or flap coverage of the formerly infected device component. Results: Seventeen of 26 patients with left ventricular assist device%related infections were cleared of their infection using this method. Ten of these patients underwent flap coverage of the device after their infection was cleared. In patients that were cleared of infection, mortality was 29 percent, whereas patients with recalcitrant infections had a mortality of 67 percent over the course of the study. Conclusions: A systematic approach to treating left ventricular assist device% related infections has the potential to treat and clear these infections, with promising overall survival rates. This proposed algorithm led to high infection clearance rates compared with previously published literature. Infection clearance in patients on left ventricular assist device destination therapy may result in mortality rates approaching those of their uninfected peers
Pulmonary microthrombi during left ventricular assist device implantation( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Critically ill heart failure patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation have alterations in their coagulation profiles; as a result, hemorrhagic complications during the postoperative period are the mostcommon and serious problems during device support of these patients. The use of aprotinin therapy is generally accepted for reducing bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting procedures, heart transplantation, and insertion of a left ventricular assist device. We describe the case of a patient who had a suprasystemic increase in pulmonary artery pressure, caused by thromboembolic occlusion of the pulmonary arterioles after urgent implantation of a left ventricular assist device. The complications developed after the patient was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and heparinization was reversed with protamine. Although the thrombosis was successfully reversedwith intraoperative administration of tissue plasminogen activator directly to the pulmonary artery, the patient died of massive hemorrhage 6 hours later. To our knowledge, the direct application of tissue plasminogen activator into the pulmonary artery in such a catastrophic situation has not been used elsewhere
Significance of anaemia in patients with advanced heart failure receiving long-term mechanical circulatory support( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Aims The aim of this study was to analyse the prognostic impact of anaemia in patients receiving long-term left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support. Methods and results We reviewed the data of 65 consecutive patients who underwent LVAD support for at least 6 months. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin levels <12.0 g/dL. Follow-up was performed 15 months after implantation. Anaemia was present in 30/65 patients (46%) after 6 months of LVAD support. Anaemic patients had higher levels of pre-implant creatinine (1.8 % 0.8 vs. 1.4 % 0.5 mg/dL; P = 0.04). The presence of anaemia after 6 months correlated with higher levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen and lower levels of albumin. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that levels of haemoglobin <12 g/dL [risk ratio (RR), 8.94; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09%73.01; P = 0.04], creatinine>1.4 mg/dL (RR, 5.39; 95% CI, 1.78%16.30; P = 0.003), and albumin <1.5 g/L (RR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.10%9.51; P = 0.03) were associated with all-cause mortality at 15 months. Long-term survival evaluated by Kaplan%Meier analysis was two times higher in non-anaemic patients after 6 months of LVAD support than in anaemic patients (P = 0.01). Conclusion Anaemia is related to adverse outcomes in patients receiving prolonged LVAD support
 
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Ischemic heart disease : surgical management
Covers
Heart failure : pathogenesis and treatment
Alternative Names
Frazier, Bud

Frazier, O. H.

Frazier, O. H. (Oscar Howard)

Frazier, Oscar Howard

Languages
English (43)