WorldCat Identities

Espenshade, Thomas J.

Overview
Works: 97 works in 249 publications in 2 languages and 5,085 library holdings
Genres: History  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: HB3505, 330.973092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Thomas J Espenshade
No longer separate, not yet equal : race and class in elite college admission and campus life by Thomas J Espenshade( )

23 editions published between 2009 and 2013 in English and held by 1,929 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How do race and social class influence who gets into America's elite colleges? This important book takes a comprehensive look at how all aspects of the elite college experience--from application and admission to enrollment and student life--are affected by these factors. To determine whether elite colleges are admitting and educating a diverse student body, the authors investigate such areas as admission advantages for minorities, academic achievement gaps tied to race and class, unequal burdens in paying for tuition, and satisfaction with college experiences. Arguing that elite higher education affects both social mobility and inequality, the authors call on educational institutions to improve access for students of lower socioeconomic status. Annotation ♭2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
The economic consequences of slowing population growth by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

18 editions published between 1977 and 2013 in English and held by 714 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Economic Consequences of Slowing Population Growth is a collection of papers dealing with the economic implications of a sustained low fertility rate on an industrialized country. The book reviews the situation prevailing in the United States including the country's demographic trends and prospects. The text also presents the uncertainties, the unknown, and the known economic consequences of low fertility as analyzed from previous generations. One paper examines the lessons that can be learned from a zero population growth in Europe by comparing theory and reality. This paper expounds on t
The fourth wave : California's newest immigrants by Thomas Muller( Book )

8 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 524 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Investing in children : new estimates of parental expenditures by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

9 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 425 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The cost of children in urban United States by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

14 editions published between 1972 and 1976 in English and held by 333 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Keys to successful immigration : implications of the New Jersey experience by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

12 editions published between 1997 and 2020 in English and held by 309 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Technological prospects and population trends( Book )

7 editions published between 1987 and 1996 in English and held by 219 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The international migration of the highly skilled : demand, supply, and development consequences in sending and receiving countries( Book )

7 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A stone's throw from Ellis Island : economic implications of immigration to New Jersey( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abitare il pianeta : futuro demografico, migrazioni e tensioni etniche by Marcello Pacini( Book )

14 editions published in 1989 in Italian and Undetermined and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Technological prospects and population trends by THOMAS J. STOLNITZ, GEORGE J ESPENSHADE( )

3 editions published between 1987 and 2021 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The world's population is now estimated at over 5 billion, and projections call for a continued high growth rate, predominantly in the less-developed countries. Concern over the consequences of this situation has led to numerous public policy debates, and the complex interrelationships between population and technology have become an important new topic in demographic research. The papers in this book are based on a symposium entitled Technological Prospects and Population Trends arranged for the 150th National Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in New York City in May 1984. The book focuses on clarification of the impact that technological development and population change have on one another. For instance, how may population and related socioeconomic trends be conditioned by expected or foreseeable technological changes? What is the impact of population on technology in both the developed and newly industrializing areas of the world? Linking demography with developments in the major areas of agriculture, education, contraception, longevity, and health care, the distinguished contributors offer diverse yet integrated perspectives on what is fast becoming one of the major issues of our time
The H-1B visa debate in historical perspective : the evolution of U.S. policy toward foreign-born workers by Margaret L Usdansky( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Immigration Reform and Control Act and undocumented migration to the United States by Michael J White( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent immigrants to Los Angeles : characteristics and labor market impacts by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper summarizes the results of a study of the impact of immigration on California, particularly in Los Angeles County. Of the 1.7 million foreign-born persons in Los Angeles County in 1980, 950,000 (or 57 percent) came to the United States after 1970. Mexican immigrants comprise almost one-half of the total of recent arrivals. They tend to be below the native population in educational attainment and occupational status. In 1980 two-thirds of the adult Mexican immigrant population in Los Angeles had less than a ninth-grade education, and five out of six experienced workers held blue-collar jobs--mostly as operatives and laborers. One-half of recent Mexican immigrant workers in Los Angeles were employed in manufacturing, and Mexican immigrants accounted for between one-third and one-half of all employment in industries such as textiles, apparel, lumber and wood, and furniture and fixtures. The influx of Mexicans to southern California during the 1970s does not appear to have increased the aggregate level of unemployment among blacks. Some of the slower-than-average wage growth in low-wage manufacturing in Los Angeles during that time is attributable to the high proportions of Mexican immigrants in these industries, but the impact of Mexican immigrants on the wages paid to non-Hispanics in semi-skilled and skilled occupations appears to be negligible. A list of references and related titles is included. (Author/PS)
The value and cost of children by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This review of recent research on the actual and perceived benefits and costs of children to their parents discusses the significance of such information to population policy makers and to parents. Conducted in developing countries (in Southeast Asia) and in the United States (with data primarily from Hawaii), the research demonstrates that the perceived costs and values of children affect birth rate and family planning behavior and that perceived economic dimensions appear to be of greater importance than socio-psychological ones. Parents in rural areas of developing countries tend to overestimate the potential economic contribution of children to the family, and parents in all countries greatly underestimate actual costs involved. An economic approach to reducing population growth is suggested. In less developed societies, this might be accomplished by developing social security systems for the aged (weakening the motive to have many children for old-age security), by substituting mothers' labor for that of children, and by simply providing parents with information on actual costs involved in childrearing. Tabular illustrations throughout the text include data on average U.S. costs for supporting a child from birth through college, with accompanying calculations for "lost" earnings of the non-working mother. (Bf)
Mexican immigration to southern California : issues of job competition and worker mobility by Donald M Manson( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Characteristics that would tend to place Mexican immigrants in direct competition with native workers for jobs at the bottom of the wage and skill hierarchy are their numbers, their largely undocumented status, low education and skill levels, and poor English-speaking ability. Using regression analysis, 1980 Census data were analyzed to determine whether concentrations of Hispanics in the labor market increased unemployment in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Analyses found no evidence of an immigration-induced increase in unemployment, even with Los Angeles' high concentration of undocumented Mexican immigrants. Significantly, Black workers, who potentially may be the group most seriously affected by a surge of low-wage immigrants, showed a general upgrading in their occupational status. There were indications, however, that this immigration may have altered the pattern of internal migration to the region. Evidence suggested that the rate of low-wage workers migrating to California from other parts of the country had declined while the flow of immigrants from Mexico had increased; and the rate of out-migration had risen steadily. Mexican immigrants who came to California during the 1970s may have served as labor market complements to skilled internal in-migrants and as substitutes for less-skilled workers. (Jmm)
Why the United States needs immigrants by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

5 editions published between 1986 and 1987 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report aims to improve the quality of the policy-making process by using a broad distribution of research findings on the consequences of immigration to California. All major immigrant groups to California are included. Using the information collected, this report discusses economic and fiscal issues associated with immigration, character and tempo of assimilation processes, and impact on California of proposals for immigrant reform. The report begins with a review of current knowledge about population dynamics in populations subject to immigration and/or emigration. Then, in the context of fertility below replacement and consistent annual immigration, two questions are explored: (1) starting from any arbitrary point, what temporal path does a population follow on its way to a long-run equilibrium stationary population; and (2) how long does it take for that stationary situation to materialize? Finally some of the policy implications surrounding the twin features of non-replacement fertility and immigration are considered, along with a possible solution to the demographic dilemma confronting industrial democracies today. Barriers to more rapid immigrant adjustment must be removed and additional facilitators to immigrant adaptation must be found to speed the process of incorporating immigrants and their children into the mainstream of society. (Ps)
A Short history of U.S. policy towards illegal migration by Thomas J Espenshade( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. immigration policy, immigrants' ages, and U.S. population size by W. Brian Arthur( Book )

3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

If U.S. birthrates remain below the replacement level and are relatively constant, and if immigration is constant both in total numbers and age-sex composition, population size will eventually become stationary, according to this policy discussion paper. Moverover, varying the constant annual number of immigrants produces an equal proportionate change in the size of the resulting stationary population. A third, often overlooked factor that can affect stationary population size is changes in immigrants' ages. Projections of the 1980 population that assume the admission of 560,000 U.S. immigrants each year show that the ultimate stationary population contains 14.4 million people if immigrants are admitted only at ages 50 to 54. But when all immigrants are admitted at ages 10-14, the resulting stationary population is 328.3 million. Thus, age at admission makes a large demographic difference--in this case, a size difference of almost 23 to 1. The intuitive reason for the large difference is that 50-year-old migrants are too old to contribute descendants born in their new country. Teenage migrants, on the other hand, contribute not only themselves but also descendants, and their descendants will in turn further reproduce. To the degree that national policy wants to use immigration to build up population size or allow it to decrease, policy could take more account of immigrants' ages. Data are presented in the text and on tables and graphs. List of references and related titles are appended. (Author/KH)
Foreign and undocumented workers in Caliornia agriculture by J. Edward Taylor( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 contains controversial provisions to allow temporary "replenishment" farmworkers to enter the United States to harvest perishable crops. This paper describes the role of legal and illegal foreign workers in California agriculture in relation to these provisions and the assumptions on which they rest. A 1983 survey of 1286 farmworkers in 37 California counties showed that 73% of all farmworkers were foreign. Citrus and other tree fruits had higher than average concentrations of foreign farmworkers (93% and 84%), while grapes had a below average concentration (67%). The relative concentration of illegal workers was (1) significantly above average for citrus, other tree fruits, and grapes, and significantly below average for field fruits and vegetables; (2) significantly above average for harvesting, tree thinning, and irrigating, and significantly below average for hoeing, crop sorting, operating machines, and serving as a foreman; and (3) significantly above average for southern San Joaquin valley and significantly below average for coastal and inland southern California. Compared to other regions, the San Joaquin valley had the highest unemployment rate and among the lowest hourly earnings for legal workers, suggesting that undocumented aliens may be displacing low skilled legal workers and depressing wage rates. This is contrary to growers' contentions, as is the lack of evidence that perishable crops depend more heavily on undocumented workers than other crops. The report contains 7 statistical tables, 13 references, and 21 related titles from the Urban Institute. (Sv)
 
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No longer separate, not yet equal : race and class in elite college admission and campus life
Covers
Keys to successful immigration : implications of the New Jersey experienceThe international migration of the highly skilled : demand, supply, and development consequences in sending and receiving countriesTechnological prospects and population trends
Languages
English (127)

Italian (10)