WorldCat Identities

Brantlinger, Patrick 1941-

Overview
Works: 43 works in 278 publications in 3 languages and 18,500 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Fiction  Essays  Handbooks and manuals  Biography  Action and adventure fiction 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: HM258, 823.809
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Patrick Brantlinger
 
Most widely held works by Patrick Brantlinger
Bread & circuses : theories of mass culture as social decay by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

33 editions published between 1983 and 2016 in 3 languages and held by 1,042 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Rule of darkness : British literature and imperialism, 1830-1914 by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

29 editions published between 1988 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 939 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A major contribution to the cultural and literary history of the Victorian age, Rule of Darkness maps the complex relationship between Victorian literary forms, genres, and theories and imperialist, racist ideology. Critics and cultural historians have usually regarded the Empire as being of marginal importance to early and mid-Victorian writers. Patrick Brantlinger asserts that the Empire was central to British culture as a source of ideological and artistic energy, both supported by and lending support to widespread belief in racial superiority, the need to transform "savagery" into "civilization," and the urgency of promoting emigration.Rule of Darkness brings together material from public records, memoirs, popular culture, and canonical literature. Brantlinger explores the influence of the novels of Captain Frederick Marryat, pioneer of British adolescent adventure fiction, and shows the importance of William Makepeace Thackeray's experience of India to his novels. He treats a number of Victorian best sellers previously ignored by literary historians, including the Anglo-Indian writer Philip Meadows Taylor's Confessions of a Thug and Seeta. Brantlinger situates explorers' narratives and travelogues by such famous author-adventurers as David Livingstone and Sir Richard Burton in relation to other forms of Victorian and Edwardian prose. Through readings of works by Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, H. Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, John Hobson, and many others, he considers representations of Africa, India, and other non-British parts of the world in both fiction and nonfiction.The most comprehensive study yet of literature and imperialism in the early and mid-Victorian years, Rule of Darkness offers, in addition, a revisionary interpretation of imperialism as a significant factor in later British cultural history, from the 1880s to World War I. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with Victorian culture and society and, more generally, with the relationship between Victorian writers and imperialism, 'and between racist ideology and patterns of domination in modern history
The reading lesson : the threat of mass literacy in nineteenth-century British fiction by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

9 editions published in 1998 in English and Undetermined and held by 740 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A companion to the Victorian novel by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

38 editions published between 2002 and 2013 in English and held by 728 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this comprehensive and accessible critical overview of the Victorian novel, a number of writers explore the religious, social, political and other contexts of the period and study the various genres or subgenres of the Victorian novel
Modernity and mass culture( Book )

11 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 717 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The spirit of reform : British literature and politics, 1832-1867 by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

15 editions published between 1976 and 1977 in English and German and held by 685 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crusoe's footprints : cultural studies in Britain and America by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

16 editions published between 1990 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 611 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

""Cultural Studies"" has emerged in British and American higher education as a movement that challenges the traditional humanities and social science disciplines. Influenced by the New Left, feminism, and poststructualist literary theory, cultural studies seeks to analyze everyday life and the social construction of ""subjectivities."" Crusoe's Footprints encompasses the movement of many colleges and universities in the 1960s towards such interdisciplinary and ""radical"" programs as American Studies, Women's Studies, and Afro-American Studies. Brantli
Dark vanishings : discourse on the extinction of primitive races, 1800-1930 by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

16 editions published between 2003 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 528 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Patrick Brantlinger here examines the commonly held nineteenth-century view that all "primitive" or "savage" races around the world were doomed sooner or later to extinction. Warlike propensities and presumed cannibalism were regarded as simultaneously noble and suicidal, accelerants of the downfall of other races after contact with white civilization. Brantlinger finds at the heart of this belief the stereotype of the self-exterminating savage, or the view that "savagery" is a sufficient explanation for the ultimate disappearance of "savages" from the grand theater of world history.Humanitarians, according to Brantlinger, saw the problem in the same terms of inevitability (or doom) as did scientists such as Charles Darwin and Thomas Henry Huxley as well as propagandists for empire such as Charles Wentworth Dilke and James Anthony Froude. Brantlinger analyzes the Irish Famine in the context of ideas and theories about primitive races in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and elsewhere. He shows that by the end of the nineteenth century, especially through the influence of the eugenics movement, extinction discourse was ironically applied to "the great white race" in various apocalyptic formulations. With the rise of fascism and Nazism, and with the gradual renewal of aboriginal populations in some parts of the world, by the 1930s the stereotypic idea of "fatal impact" began to unravel, as did also various more general forms of race-based thinking and of social Darwinism
Fictions of state : culture and credit in Britain, 1694-1994 by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

7 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 425 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this ambitious book, Patrick Brantlinger offers a cultural history of Great Britain focused on the concept of "public credit," from the 1694 founding of the Bank of England to the present. He draws on literary texts ranging from Augustan satire such as Gulliver's Travels to postmodern satire such as Martin Amis's Money: A Suicide Note, all of which critique the misrecognition of public credit as wealth
Who killed Shakespeare? : what's happened to English since the radical sixties by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 390 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Taming cannibals : race and the Victorians by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

14 editions published between 2011 and 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 348 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the dust jacket. In Taming Cannibals, Patrick Brantlinger unravels contradictions embedded in the racist and imperial ideology of the British Empire. For many Victorians, the idea of taming cannibals or civilizing savages was oxymoronic: civilization was a goal that the nonwhite peoples of the world could not attain or, at best, could only approximate, yet the "civilizing mission" was viewed as the ultimate justification for imperialism. Similarly, the supposedly unshakeable certainty of Anglo-Saxon racial superiority was routinely undercut by widespread fears about racial degeneration through contact with "lesser" races or concerns that Anglo-Saxons might be superseded by something superior -- an even "fitter" or "higher" race or species. Brantlinger traces the development of those fears through close readings of a wide range of texts -- including Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Fiji and the Fijians by Thomas Williams, Daily Life and Origin of the Tasmanians by James Bonwick, The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Culture and Anarchy by Matthew Arnold, She by H. Rider Haggard, and The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells. Throughout the wide-ranging, capacious, and rich Taming Cannibals, Brantlinger combines the study of literature with sociopolitical history and postcolonial theory in novel ways
Energy & entropy : science and culture in Victorian Britain : essays from Victorian studies( Book )

12 editions published between 1988 and 1989 in English and held by 342 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Victorian literature and postcolonial studies by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

14 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book examines the relationship between the British Empire and Victorian literature. It explains how Victorian literature both gave expression to pro-imperialist themes, and engaged with forms of opposition to the empire like abolitionism and early Indian nationalism. Victorian literature is analyzed in relation to key debates in postcolonial studies about Orientalism, race, gender, Marxism, subalterneity, imperial historiography, mimicry and representation. And there are in-depth examinations of works by major Victorian authors in an imperial context, notably those of Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Disraeli, Tennyson, Yeats, Kipling and Conrad."--Jacket
She : a history of adventure by H. Rider Haggard( Book )

10 editions published between 2001 and 2004 in English and held by 226 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

'She' is Ayesha, the mysterious white queen of a Central African tribe. She is also the goal of a quest bequeathed to three English gentlemen who travel through shipwreck, fever, and cannibals to find her hidden realm
Confessions of a Thug by Meadows Taylor( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A historical novel on crime and retribution set in 1832 in India
States of emergency : essays on culture and politics by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

9 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some articles have appeared previously
The Reverend Pearl May Patrick, an Indiana Progressive (1875-1962) : one of America's first ordained women by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Who killed Shakespeare? : what's happened to English since the radical sixties by Patrick Brantlinger( Book )

6 editions published between 2001 and 2013 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company
Harriet Martineau's writing on the British Empire by Harriet Martineau( Book )

2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The literary presence of Harriet Martineau pervades 19th-century English and American culture. This edition makes her work available, and focuses on her writings on imperialism. It should be of interest to scholars of colonialism, women's writing, Victorian studies, sociology and journalism
Harriet Martineau's Writing on the British Empire by Antoinette M Burton( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The literary presence of Harriet Martineau pervades 19th-century English and American culture. This edition makes her work available, and focuses on her writings on imperialism. It should be of interest to scholars of colonialism, women's writing, Victorian studies, sociology and journalism
 
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The reading lesson : the threat of mass literacy in nineteenth-century British fiction
Alternative Names
Brantlinger, Patrick

Brantlinger, Patrick Morgan 1941-

ブラントリンガー, P

Languages
English (238)

Japanese (2)

German (1)

Covers
Rule of darkness : British literature and imperialism, 1830-1914The reading lesson : the threat of mass literacy in nineteenth-century British fictionA companion to the Victorian novelModernity and mass cultureCrusoe's footprints : cultural studies in Britain and AmericaDark vanishings : discourse on the extinction of primitive races, 1800-1930Fictions of state : culture and credit in Britain, 1694-1994Who killed Shakespeare? : what's happened to English since the radical sixties