WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:12:04 2014 UTClccn-n831853720.00A tribute to Edwin S. Porter (lectures and a symposium)0.471.00Dawn of the eye. Episodes 1 and 249293478Edwin_S._Portern 831853721001998Porter, Ed 1870-1941Porter, Edward, 1870-1941Porter, Edwin 1870-1941Porter, Edwin Stanton, 1870-1941Porter, Edwin Stratton, 1870-1941lccn-n82047800Thomas A. Edison, Inclccn-n87878923Musser, Charlesprodrtedtlccn-n80126308Edison, Thomas A.(Thomas Alva)1847-1931proprfdrtlccn-n88041249Shepard, Davidlccn-n79083582Griffith, D. W.(David Wark)1875-1948cstprfdrtlccn-no2002027587Zecca, Ferdinand1864-1947prfdrtlccn-n85178097Lumière, Louis1864-1948prfdrtlccn-n85138076Kino International Corporationdstlccn-n94071247McCutcheon, Wallaceattdrtactnp-dawley, j searleDawley, J. SearleattdrtPorter, Edwin S.HistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcDramaGamesBiographySilent filmsTravelogues (Motion pictures)Motion picturesUnited StatesMotion picturesThomas A. Edison, IncMotion picture industryPorter, Edwin SMotion picture producers and directorsEdison, Thomas A.--(Thomas Alva),Edison Electric Light CompanyCinematographyKinetoscopeNew York (State)--New YorkNew York (State)--BuffaloExhibition catalogsPan-American ExpositionNew York (State)--East RiverMcKinley, William,Exhibition buildingsRiversEskimosTrain robberiesNazimova,KidnappingIndians--WarsCinematographersAssassinationRefuse and refuse disposalPresidents--AssassinationTowersWaterfrontsIslandsHarborsBridgesMotion picture film collectionsChristmasElectrocutionSanitation workersPrisonsNew York (State)New York (State)--New York--Brooklyn BridgeAuburn PrisonCzolgosz, Leon F.,IncineratorsGunboatsPresidents--InaugurationTableauxPolice patrol--Specialized unitsWaste disposal sitesBargesConstruction equipmentPiers187019411898190019011902190319041905190619071908190919131914192519311960197019721974197519761977197819791980198219831985198619871988198919901991199219941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120126993351572791.430973PN1993.5.A1ocn040858976ocn227209263ocn047278731ocn071824889ocn827293712ocn827293679ocn827293730ocn827293786ocn827294898ocn827294492ocn827293712ocn827293679ocn827295240ocn827294834ocn827293730ocn827294335ocn827293634ocn827294492ocn827294898ocn827295408ocn062902175ocn827295408ocn827294609ocn827294335ocn827293580ocn827294814ocn827295596ocn753590248ocn753590485ocn839317983ocn753620006ocn753633021ocn753234262ocn551222559ocn753593623ocn837637908ocn220148556ocn220124963ocn2201559426852ocn057182599visu20050.28Edison the invention of the moviesHistoryCommercial motion pictures were invented at the Edison Laboratory between 1888 and 1893. Perhaps none of the component parts were strictly new, but the ability of Edison and his staff to reorganize them for a specific purpose was an extraordinary cultural achievement. In 1894, Edison was the sole producer of motion pictures in the world. Many Edison films continue to be impressive as the company employed such accomplished early directors as John Collins and Alan Crosland4943ocn040858976visu19940.39Landmarks of early filmHistoryA compilation of the very earliest films from the first projections of moving images to the advent of the feature film, an area of film history often underseen, underappreciated and understudied33829ocn054358003visu19030.28The great train robberyHistoryDramaThis special edition contains two versions of this historically significant western the original silent archival version and a digitally enhanced version with new music, effects track and color sequences29414ocn227209263visu19820.50Before the Nickelodeon the early cinema of Edwin S. PorterHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcBiographyPublisher description: Between the years 1894 to 1908, Edwin S. Porter was the leading American filmmaker. Follows his movie career, from his first job installing Thomas Edison's Vitascope machines in New York, through his business as a film exhibitor, to his job as head of Edison's movie studio. There he created story films: Jack and the Beanstalk, The Life of an American Fireman, and The Great Train Robbery. By 1909, his film technique was old fashioned. Fired by Edison, he continued making films until 1915, but he had been left behind by new directors with new techniques2296ocn032175032visu19940.35The great train robbery & other primary worksHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcSilent filmsMotion picturesA collection of early motion picture films, including works by Eadweard Muybridge, Louis and Auguste Lumière, Georges Méliès' "Le voyage dans la lune", Edwin S. Porter's "The great train robbery" and Segundo de Chomon's "The golden beetle."2071ocn050778665visu20020.33The great train robbery and other primary works a treasury of early cinema, 1894-1913HistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcThe genesis of the motion picture medium is recreated in this collection of films from cinema's formative period. More than crucial historical artifacts, these films reveal the foundation from which the styles and stories of the contemporary cinema would later arise1232ocn048798726visu20010.24A Christmas past vintage holiday films, 1901-1925Silent vignettes of the Christmas holiday season, digitally remastered1094ocn701797954visu19030.63Sorting refuse at incinerating plant, New York CityThe subject is a group of about thirty men and boys who are sorting combustible refuse, mostly paper, and stuffing it into large sacks. In the background a man in a hat with an emblem on it can be seen unloading trash from a large wagon. Location may be the New York City Sanitation Department's East 17th Street facility, or possibly the incinerator at West 47th Street on the Hudson River1094ocn701798011visu19010.63President McKinley and escort going to the CapitolFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PRESIDENT McKINLEY AND ESCORT GOING TO THE CAPITOL. This most excellent picture was secured at the junction of Pennsylvania Avenue and Fifteenth Street. The parade is headed by a platoon of mounted police; next comes the Grand Marshal, Major- General Francis V. Green, and staff, as follows: A. Noel Blakeman, Lieut. Col. John S. Johnson, Major-General N.E. Thompson, U.S.A., Brigadier-General U.S.W. Day, U.S.V., Lieut. Winfield S. Overton, U.S.A., all mounted on splendid horses. Next come the famous Troop A, of Cleveland, Ohio, who act as the personal escort of the President. They present a most striking appearance as they go down the incline on Fifteenth Street, Washington. Next comes President McKinley in his carriage drawn by four of his own horses, the pair of blacks in the lead and the favorite bays on the wheel. The President is seated in the right of the carriage with Senator Hanna on the left beside him, and facing them, with their backs to the driver, are seated Representatives Cannon and McRae. Owing to special permits granted us by the United States Government, we were able to have our camera within twenty feet of the President's carriage when it passed, and an absolutely perfect photograph was secured. The President's carriage is followed by Secretaries Hay and Gage. The third carriage contains Secretary Root, Attorney-General Griggs and the President's Private Secretary Cortelyou. The fourth carriage contains Secretaries Long, Wilson, Hitchcock and Postmaster-General Smith. The fifth carriage contains Lieutenant-General Miles and Admiral Dewey. We also present excellent pictures of the Admiral of the Navy and the General commanding the United States Army as they pass. This picture closes up by showing a detachment of Veterans of the Twenty-third Ohio Volunteers, followed closely by the West Point Cadets, who present a remarkable spectacle as they execute left wheel turning from Fifteenth Street into Pennsylvania Avenue1095ocn701797914visu19030.66New York Harbor Police boat Patrol capturing piratesSilent filmsThis was probably filmed in the southern part of the Upper New York Bay looking towards the Narrows, with Fort Lafayette partly visible in the far background. The subject is a simulated capture by the police gunboat "Patrol" of three "pirates" in a rowboat. Puffs of smoke appear as the gunboat fires several rounds from the bow cannon, which can be clearly seen later in a side view of the boat. The "Patrol" was a steel, twin screw, 135 foot, 118 ton police boat, built in 1893 at Sparrow's Point, Maryland1095ocn701797936visu19030.66Panorama water front and Brooklyn Bridge from East RiverThis film depicts the East River shoreline and the piers of lower Manhattan starting at about Pier 5 (the New York Central Pier) opposite Broad Street, and extending to the Mallory Line steamship piers just south of Fulton Street and the Brooklyn Bridge. The film begins with shots of canal boats or barges (from the Erie Canal via the Hudson River) docked at and around Coenties Slip. As the film progresses, the New York Produce Exchange located at Bowling Green, Manhattan, with its distinct tower, comes into view in the background. Between here and the Wall Street ferry, there follows in order of appearance: steam tugs, a wooden hull barkentine with box barges alongside, a docked iron hull sailing ship, probably British, an ocean steamer with yards on the foremast, a derrick lighter laden with barrels docked at the end of a pier, and a fruit steamer. In the Wall Street Ferry slip (between Piers 15 and 16) there is a Wall St., Manhattan-to-Montague St., Brooklyn, double-ended steam commuter boat. The ferry is visible immediately before a shot of the large advertising billboards on Pier 16. The film next shows the Ward Line piers (J.E. Ward & Co., New York and Cuba Steamship Co.), a Pennsylvania Railroad tug, a derrick lighter, and the Mallory Line piers. A Mallory Line steamer can be seen on the south side of one of the Mallory Piers. The camera begins panning out into the East River after passing pier 20, catching the fog bell at the end of pier 21. A car float is visible passing under the Brooklyn Bridge. The pan follows the line of the Brooklyn Bridge eastward to Brooklyn Heights, where the Hotel Margaret (tall building in background) is visible just before the end of the film. This film continues the view begun in the film Sky Scrapers of New York City From the North River. Together they comprise a sweep around the southern tip of Manhattan, from Fulton Street on the Hudson to the Brooklyn Bridge1084ocn701797991visu19010.63Esquimaux villageGamesFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: THE ESQUIMAUX VILLAGE. One of the principal features at the Pan-American Exposition is the Alaskan or Esquimaux Village. In this most interesting exhibit, scenes are enacted just as they take place in the far away frozen North. In this subject we depict a large number of Esquimaux clothed in their native costumes and seated on their sleds, which are drawn by spans of four Esquimaux dogs. They are engaged in a race and are to be seen running over the ice and snow at a high rate of speed. There is a pond in the foreground of the picture on the shores of which the home stretch of the race takes place. The picture is perfect photographically, and the figures stand out clear and sharp, throwing a most perfect reflection on the pond1084ocn701798000visu19010.63The martyred presidentsFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: THE MARTYRED PRESIDENTS--LINCOLN, GARFIELD, McKINLEY. Ungueltig. [code for telegraphic orders]. We have just finished and now offer to exhibitors a picture which we consider most valuable as an ending to the series of McKinley funeral pictures. The scene opens with a beautiful woman who represents Columbia seated at the altar of Justice. As if from out of space there slowly appears a perfect and lifelike picture of Abraham Lincoln. The forming of the picture is first noticed by the appearance of what seems to be a mere spot on the front of the altar. This spot slowly enlarges and is focused into shape, until, to the amazement of the audience, the face of the great emancipator is clearly shown. President Lincoln's likeness is allowed to remain upon the altar just long enough for recognition, when, in the same mysterious manner that it appeared, it slowly fades and in its place their grows the picture of President Garfield. This in a like manner fades away, and again as out of the dim distance comes the picture of our great martyred President, William McKinley. The tableau is then dissolved into a picture of an assassin kneeling before the throne of Justice. Here the tableau ends, leaving an impression of mingled sorrow and sublimity upon the audience. We predict for this picture a remarkable success, and particularly where it is shown in connection with the funeral ceremonies of the illustrious McKinley. Class B 75 ft. $11.251084ocn701797990visu19010.63Esquimaux leap-frogGamesThe film, photographed from a single camera position, shows buildings resembling igloos on ice floes, in front of which persons clothed as Eskimos play a game of leapfrog1084ocn701798007visu19010.63Panorama of esplanade by nightFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE ESPLANADE BY NIGHT. Unhairing. [code for telegraphic orders] A most perfect picture of the Pan-American Exposition buildings, including the Electric Tower and Temple of Music, as they appear at night. Class B 50 ft. $6.001084ocn701798009visu19010.63Panoramic view of Electric Tower from a balloonFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE ELECTRIC TOWER FROM A BALLOON. Here we have recorded a very novel scene, the camera having been placed in the basket of the captive balloon at the Pan-American Exposition. It was then slowly elevated to the top of the Tower, a distance of 465 feet, and slowly lowered until it reached the ground, keeping the Tower in view all the time during the ascent and descent, ending with a very interesting view of the base of the Tower, with crowds of people passing to and fro1084ocn701797934visu19030.63Panorama of Riker's Island, N.YThe film was photographed from a boat going around Riker's Island. Located on the East River north of Hell Gate between the Bronx and Queens, Riker's Island was the site of a massive New York City landfill operation at the time of the filming (originally eighty-seven acres, by 1939 the size of the island had increased to four hundred acres). The film includes scenes of heavy equipment at work, including pile drivers constructing the seawall and steam shovels unloading rubbish from barges. On one of the steam shovels, a sign reading "Water Front Improvement Co., 220 Broadway, New York" can be distinguished [Frame: 3502]. Near the end of the film, a narrow-gauge steam engine with five open cars loaded with landfill, comes into view [3826]. The island is currently the site of a New York City penitentiary1084ocn701797930visu19030.63Panorama of Blackwell's Island, N.YSilent filmsTravelogues (Motion pictures)This film was photographed from a boat heading south along the eastern shore of Blackwell's Island (known today as Roosevelt Island). The island lies in the East River, between Manhattan (which can be seen in the background) and Long Island City, Queens. It is approximately one and three-quarters of a mile long, extending from 51st Street to 88th, and at the time of the filming was the location for a number of New York City's charitable and penal institutions. The film opens showing the lighthouse at the north end of the island (Hallet's Cove). As the boat enters the east channel of the river, the stacks of a large brewery on Manhattan are visible in the distance. The camera pans along the island's granite seawall (built by inmates of the Penitentiary and Workhouse) and the following buildings, in order of appearance, are shown: the New York City Lunatic Asylum; the Workhouse; the Almshouse; piers for the Queensborough (or 59th Street) Bridge, which upon completion in 1908 will span 135 feet above the island; the Almshouse Keeper's House (originally the home of the Blackwell family, who had once owned the island); the Penitentiary; Charity Hospital. The film ends before reaching the southern tip of the island1084ocn701797992visu19010.66Execution of Czolgosz, with panorama of Auburn PrisonDramaFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: ELECTROCUTION OF CZOLGOSZ. . A detailed reproduction of the execution of the assassin of President McKinley faithfully carried out from the description of an eye witness. The picture is in three scenes. First: Panoramic view of Auburn Prison taken the morning of the electrocution. The picture then dissolves into the corridor of murderer's row. The keepers are seen taking Czolgosz from his cell to the death chamber, and shows State Electrician, Wardens and Doctors making final test of the chair. Czolgosz is then brought in by the guard and is quickly strapped into the chair. The current is turned on at a signal from the Warden, and the assassin heaves heavily as though the straps would break. He drops prone after the current is turned off. The doctors examine the body and report to the Warden that he is dead, and he in turn officially announces the death to the witness1024ocn701797988visu19010.63Esquimaux game of snap-the-whipGamesFrom a contemporary Edison film company catalog: SCENE IN THE ESQUIMAUX VILLAGE. Ungulado. [code for telegraphic orders]. The picture [shows] a number of Esquimaux picking nickels from cracks in a board with their dog whips, in which sport they are very expert. In the background will be seen one of their "Topeks," a sealskin tent in which they live during their short summer. Class B 75 ft. $9.009667ocn021560893book19860.53Musser, CharlesBefore the nickelodeon : Edwin S. Porter and the Edison Manufacturing CompanyHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etc2601ocn002118512book19770.56Spears, JackThe Civil War on the screen, and other essays467ocn015059804visu19820.50Before the Nickelodeon the early cinema of Edwin S. PorterHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcBiographyA portrait of film producer Edwin S. Porter. Spotlights the years 1894 to 1908, as onetime silent film star Blanche Sweet narrates. Includes hand-tinted stills and segments from Porter's movies and those of other filmmakers111ocn056572274visu20030.47Dawn of the eyeHistoryBiographyTraces the history of the filmed-news industry from the development of the movie camera in 1895 which led quickly to the newsreels shown in vaudeville and then in movie theaters twice a week. In reality, much of what was shown was staged by pre-Hollywood film studios. Film shows the competitiveness and tricks used as news reporting got its start and includes rare footage of very early newsreel films and some of the first images ever recorded on film91ocn079432726visu20050.73Dawn of the eyeHistoryBiographyTraces the history of the filmed-news industry from the development of the movie camera in 1895 which led quickly to the newsreels shown in vaudeville and then in movie theaters twice a week. In reality, much of what was shown was staged by pre-Hollywood film studios. Film shows the competitiveness and tricks used as news reporting got its start and includes rare footage of very early newsreel films and some of the first images ever recorded on film31ocn298564113visu0.47The Art of filmHistoryCriticism, interpretation, etcShows scenes from Edwin S. Porter's The Great train robbery and Streets of New York, D. W. Griffith's Way down East and A girl and her trust, a Mack Sennett chase and other films in order to trace the development of the chase scene as an exciting and/or comic element in filmmaking since its earliest days21ocn074344185book19800.47Gaudreault, AndréFilmographie partielle de l'oeuvre d'Edwin S. Porter à la Compagnie Edison entre 1903 et 1909Catalogs21ocn234145929visu20051.00Dawn of the eye. Episodes 1 and 2HistoryBiographyEyes of the world: A history of the news camera from 1919 to 1945. Shows how Hollywood took over motion picture news and produced newsreels for entertainment purposes only. The images of the depression with mass unemployment and social and political unrest were kept off movie screens - with just a few exceptions. Shows how the importance of newsreels as propaganda emerged first in Germany but spread to the United States and Canada with the outbreak of the war. Explains the impact of newsreel camermen reporting21ocn064557895visu20030.47History through a lensHistoryBiographyDocumentary that traces the history of the filmed-news industry from the development of the movie camera in 1895 which led quickly to the newsreels shown in vaudeville and then in movie theaters twice a week. In reality, much of what was shown was staged by pre-Hollywood film studios. Shows the competitiveness and tricks used as news reporting got its start and includes rare footage of very early newsreel films and some of the first images ever recorded on film11ocn084049408rcrd1978Gartenberg, JonA tribute to Edwin S. Porter, the Edison yearsHistory11ocn024819342book19910.47Weisner, Janice BethTurn-of-the century city sketches of Edwin Porter and Theodore DreiserCriticism, interpretation, etc11ocn057252239rcrd19740.47Brakhage, StanBrakhage lectures Jonas Mekas11ocn079100944rcrd1978A tribute to Edwin S. Porter (lectures and a symposium)History11ocn057252301rcrd19740.47Brakhage, StanBrakhage lectures Charlie Chaplin, Edwin S. Porter, D.W. Griffith, Ladislaw Starewicz, Dziga Vertov, Sergei Eisenstein11ocn060375903art1999Porter, Edwin StantonBiography11ocn057256254rcrd19760.47Brakhage, StanBrakhage lectures Gunvor Nelson11ocn825094998visu19970.47Born among clownsHistoryA history of the news camera from 1894 to 1919. Follows the development of the newsreel from the invention of motion pictures by the Lumiere brothers and its beginnings in vaudeville, to its becoming an important means of bringing the world's news to the public, with the coverage of important events such as the coronation of Czar Nicholas II, the Spanish-American war, the Boer War, and the First World War. Shows the development of such trends as government censorship, news as propaganda, and the importance of business interests. Illustrates how many of the most popular and effective newsreels of the time were in fact fictional creations11ocn078680636visu19851.00The Chase in the evolution of the moviesCriticism, interpretation, etcShows scenes from Edwin S. Porter's The Great train robbery and Streets of New York, D. W. Griffith's Way down East and A girl and her trust, a Mack Sennett chase and other films in order to trace the development of the chase scene as an exciting and/or comic element in filmmaking since its earliest days11ocn215052584visu19971.00Dawn of the eyeHistoryBiographyTraces the history of the filmed-news industry from the development of the movie camera in 1895 which quickly led to newsreels shown in vaudeville and then in movie theaters twice a week. In reality, much of what was shown was staged by pre-Hollywood film studios. Film shows the competitiveness and tricks used as news reporting got its start and includes rare footage of very early newsreel films11ocn531901764art19950.10Quigley, MartinPorter, Edwin S.: DirectorBiography DictionariesFri Mar 21 15:28:37 EDT 2014batch41746