WorldCat Identities

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Coastal Ecology Group

Overview
Works: 119 works in 530 publications in 1 language and 23,070 library holdings
Classifications: SK361, 597.0973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest) : Pacific oyster by Gilbert B Pauley( Book )

136 editions published between 1983 and 1989 in English and held by 5,977 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, ecological role, fishery (when appropriate), and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist coastal managers, engineers, and biologists in the gathering of information pertinent to costal development activities. The Pacific razor clam has a long history of human consumption on the west coast. Turn-of-the-century commercial canning operations have given way to today's extensive recreational fishery. Razor clams spawn in late spring and early summer in the Pacific Northwest and recruit to flat, sandy beaches in late summer. Greatest densities of large clams occur in the lower intertidal zone. Razor clams grow and mature faster but attain a lower maximum size and age in the southern part of their range. They are noted for their unusual ability to dig very rapidly through the subsurface sand. Silt-generating activities should be avoided in the vicinity of razor clam beaches, as juveniles are susceptible to suffocation. Keywords: Life cycles; Exposed beaches; Intertidal zone; Fisheries; Growth physiology; Feeding habits; Predators; Sediments; Siltation; Clams; Aquaculture; Pacific razor clam; Siliqua patula; Environmental requirements; Temperature requirements; Reproduction physiology
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic) : alewife/blueback herring by Jon G Stanley( Book )

66 editions published between 1983 and 1986 in English and held by 1,873 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are intended to assist in environmental impact assessment. Atlantic salmon are a highly prized sport fish and their flesh is gourmet table fare. Once abundant in New England's coastal rivers, they are only now being restored to portions of their original habitat. Populatons declined following development of industries along rivers and commercial fisheries in estuaries. Atlantic salmon are anadromous. Spawning, embryo development and growth of young fish occur in freshwater streams and rivers. Juvenile survival is highest in clear, cool (<27 C), well oxygenated (dissolved oxygen> 5 mg/l) streams. Flowing smoltification, a physiological change enabling entry into salt water, fish migrate downstream and then to oceanic feeding grounds near Greenland, where they grow rapidly. Sexually mature fish return to their natural rivers to spawn. Migration into estuaries and lower reaches of river begins 7 months before the October-November spawning period. Migrating adults require dissolved oxygen concentrations greater than 6 mg/l for successful upstream movement. Because juveniles migrate through the coastal zone in spring and adults in summer and fall the species is especially vulnerable to the consequences of coastal development
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic and mid-Atlantic) : tautog and cunner by Peter J Auster( Book )

14 editions published between 1986 and 1989 in English and held by 801 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries on taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal finfishes and shellfishes. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The systematic classification of the sand lances Ammodytes americanus and Ammodytes dubius is confusing because of overlapping meristic values. In this report, all sand lances in the North Atlantic area off the coast of the United States are treated as a combined group (Ammodytes spp.). Sand lances occur in estuarine, open coast, and offshore habitats. They are important prey to many commercially and recreationally valuable fish and marine mammals. Spawning occurs principally inshore between November and March. Larvae are found along the coasts to the edge of the Continental Shelf. Sand lances occur in schools of from tens of thousands of individuals. They are planktivorous predators; copepods are their major prey item. To rest and to take refuge from predators, sand lances burrow into sand substrates. One ot three-year-old fish dominate populations. Growth rate probably increases from the New York Bight to the Nova Scotia banks. Exploitation of sand lances off the Northeast coast of the United States is presently only for baitfish
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico) : sea catfish and gafftopsail catfish by Robert J Muncy( Book )

11 editions published between 1983 and 1985 in English and held by 425 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic) : white shrimp by Robert J Muncy( Book )

9 editions published between 1983 and 1984 in English and held by 295 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida) : long-spined black sea urchin by John C Ogden( Book )

5 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 223 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history and environmental impact assessment. The long-spined black sea urchin, Diadema antillarum, is one of the most common marine invertebrates in the South Florida and Caribbean regions. Diadema is gregarious and is found in large groups on hard bottom in shallow waters. Spawning is year-round, concentrated in late winter to early summer, and the larvae spend in maximum size of about 10 cm in 3 to 4 years. Diadema is a grazer, feeding on small algal filaments and on seagrass, and tends to be active at night. Grazing activities can produce grazed halos around patch reefs in the vicinity of seagrass beds. Many experiments have indicated the importance of this grazing in the coexistence of species on the reef and in maintaining high biological productivity. In 1983-84, Diadema suffered an unprecedented mass mortality and its populations were reduced by up to 98% throughout its range. The elimination of Diadema has affected algal biomass, reef productivity, and fish populations. Diadema populations are slowly beginning to increase, but complete recovery may take years. Keywords: Feeding habits, Life cycles, Reproduction(Biology), Marine biology, Ecosystems, Competition
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fish and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest) : Pacific geoduck clam by C. Lynn Goodwin( Book )

6 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The geoduck clam (Panope abrupta Conrad) is one of the largest burrowing clams in the world and ranges along the west coast of North American from Alaska to Baja California and along coastal Japan. It lives at depths extending from the lower intertidal zone to 110 m and is very abundant in Puget Sound, Washington, and British Columbia, where it supports important commercial fisheries. Geoduck clams are commercially fished by divers, who wash them from the substrate with hand-operated water jets. Significant portions of the catch are exported to Japan. Geoduck clams are long-lived, reaching ages of at least 146 years. Growth is rapid, but recruitment rates are low. Because of their high value, large size, and rapid early growth but low recruitment rates, they are being artificially stocked in Washington waters. Keywords: Taxonomy, Tange, Morphology, Life stages, Spawning cycle, Fisheries, Population dynamics, Growth rate, Predators, Environmental requirements, Pollution, Food habits. (SDW)
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest) : brown rock crab, red rock crab, and yellow crab by Jay C Carroll( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, habitats, and environmental requirements of coastal species of fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. Rock crab is the common name designating three similar species of edible crabs: brown rock crab (Cancer antennarius), red rock crab (C. productus), and yellow crab (C. anthonyl). The three species co-occur in shallow coastal waters throughout the Pacific Southwest region. The yellow crab is most common in southern California on sand substrate, and the red rock crab in northernmost areas on rock or gravel substrates; the brown rock crab occurs on rock or sand substrates in all areas. Rock crabs are sought commercially to fill an increasing market demand for whole crabs that approached 2 million pounds annually in 1986. Most of the catch comes from the region of Morro Bay south to Los Angeles, including the Channel Islands. Egg-bearing females are commonly found during winter, although they may occur throughout the year. Rock crabs go through five zoeal stags and one megalopal stage during a larval period that generally requires 90-120 days. Metamorphosis and settlement of the first crab stage is on either sand rock, and crabs may reach maturity within 1-2 years. All three species are predators on a variety of shelled mollusks, but are also considered scavengers. They are a major food for many commercially and recreationally important fishes, as well as for the threatened southern sea otter, Enhydra lutris. (SDW)
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest) : olympia oyster by David Couch( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic Bight) : Atlantic and shortnose sturgeons by Carter Rowell Gilbert( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest) : ghost shrimp and blue mud shrimp by Susanna Hornig( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This species profile is one of a series on coastal aquatic organisms, principally fish, of sport, commercial, or ecological importance. The profiles are designed to provide coastal managers, engineers, and biologists with a brief comprehensive sketch of the biological characteristics and environmental requirements of the species and to describe how populations of the species may be expected to react to environmental changes caused by coastal development. Each profile has sections on taxonomy, life history, ecological role, environment requirements, and economic importance, if applicable. The ghost shrimp is found in intertidal areas along the west coast of North America from Mutiny Bay, Alaska, to the mouth of the Tijuana River, San Diego County, California; and Ricketts and Calvin (1968) reported finding specimens as far south as El Estuario de Punto Banda, Baja California Norte, Mexico. The blue mud shrimp is found from southeastern Alaska to San Quentin Bay (Bahia de San Quentin) in Baja California Norte. The general distribution of the two species in the Pacific Northwest is identical. Keywords: Morphology biology, Crustacea, Callianassa, Californiensis dana, Upogebia pugettensis(Dana), Eggs, Larvae, Habitats, Growth physiology, Fisheries, Food, Feeding
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida) : reef-building tube worm by Alexander V Zale( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic) : sandworm and bloodworm by W. Herbert Wilson( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic) : Atlantic tomcod by Lance L Stewart( Book )

4 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Life history and environmental requirements of loggerhead turtles by David A Nelson( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North and Mid-Atlantic) : blue mussel by Roger I. E Newell( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida) : reef-building corals by James W Porter( Book )

3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. Four species of reef-building corals are considered: elkhorn coral, staghorn coral, common star coral, and large star coral. All four species spawn annually in the fall during hurricane season. Juvenile recruitment is low in all four species. Rapid growth rates of species in the genus Acropora (10-20 cm/yr) contrast with slower growth rates of species in the genus Montastraea (1.0-2.0 cm/yr), but both species of Montastraea are also important in reef development due to their massive form and great longevity. Shallow-water colonies of Montastraea survive hurricanes; shallow colonies of Acropora do not. Because of their dependence on photosynthesis for all of their carbon acquisition, the Acropora species reviewed here have a more restricted depth distribution (0-30 m) than do the Montastraea species considered (0-70 m)
Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fish and invertebrates (North Atlantic) : softshell clam by Carter R Newell( Book )

6 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Blue crab by Jennifer Hill( Book )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Species profiles : life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Florida) : black, red, and Nassau groupers by Darryl E Jory( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Black, red, and Nassau groupers (Mycteroperca bonaci, Epinephelus morio, and E. striatus, respectively) are widely distributed on rocky bottoms and reefs along the south Florida coast. They are the most valuable marine finfish group in Florida, comprising about 25% of the total value of landings in 1984. The three species can be distinguished by morphometric, meristic, and body color characteristics. Younger fish are typically found in shallow, inshore grass beds, and larger, older fish are generally restricted to deep waters. The three species are protogynous hermaphrodites. Sexual transition can occur at any length over about 300 mm SL. An offshore movement apparently coincides with the onset of sexual maturity. Spawning aggregations have been observed throughout the year, but occur mostly between late spring and early summer. Fecundity estimates range from about 800,000 to over 5,000,000 eggs per female. Both the eggs and the larvae are planktonic. Growth rates range from about 2 to 10 mm/ month. The three species are unspecialized carnivores, feeding on a variety of fishes, crustaceans, and mollusks. Interspecific competition for food and shelter may be common because of the overlap in distribution, habitat, size, and food habits. For the three species, a number of predators and parasites have been reported. Both the black and red groupers have been implicated in ciguatera poisonings in south Florida
 
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Languages
English (290)