WorldCat Identities

Levin, Nora

Overview
Works: 61 works in 166 publications in 3 languages and 3,826 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Exhibition catalogs  Biography  Personal narratives‡vJewish  Personal narratives  Personal narratives‡vAmerican 
Roles: Author, Creator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Nora Levin
The holocaust : the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945 by Nora Levin( Book )

27 editions published between 1967 and 1989 in English and German and held by 2,012 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A major comprehensive in depth study of the Holocaust beginning with the "racial myths" and continuing through the mass exterminations in Nazi gas Chambers. includes extensive notes. well indexed
The Jews in the Soviet Union since 1917 : paradox of survival by Nora Levin( Book )

43 editions published between 1987 and 1990 in English and Undetermined and held by 749 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While Messiah tarried : Jewish socialist movements, 1871-1917 by Nora Levin( Book )

10 editions published between 1977 and 1979 in 3 languages and held by 484 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jewish socialism was a formative factor of modern Jewish history. Levin recaptures the personalities, ideas, and events of the far-reaching socialist movements. In tracing the development of the ideologies of the differing socialist groups, she portrays the often bitter struggles they had with each other and with the non-Jewish socialist movements, especially in Russia
The Holocaust years : the Nazi destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945 by Nora Levin( Book )

11 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 305 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jewish socialist movements, 1871-1917 : while Messiah tarried by Nora Levin( Book )

13 editions published in 1978 in English and Undetermined and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The living witness : art in the concentration camps : Museum of American Jewish History, October 18-November 19, 1978 by 1st, Philadelphia, 1978 Internationaal Conference on the Lessons of the Holocaust( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kniga pami︠a︡ti( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in Russian and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The holocaust : the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-45 by Nora Levin( Recording )

3 editions published between 1977 and 1987 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gives an account of how six million Jews were slaughtered during World War II by premeditated official plan. The lectures are divided in two major sections, the first concerning the preparation for the holocaust, the second devoted to the deportations
The holocaust ; the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945. : the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945 by Nora Levin( Book )

2 editions published between 1973 and 1974 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jews in the Soviet Union : a history from 1917 to the present by Nora Levin( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mordechai Anielewicz : leader of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising by Nora Levin( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Holocaust : the destruction of European Jewry 1933-1945 (Course Outline) by Nora Levin( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Samuel Sherron memoir by Samuel Sherron( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What should we tell our children about the Holocaust and when by Nora Levin( Recording )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

by Nora Levin( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The papers of this prominent student of the Holocaust documents her ongoing interest in the survival of Judaism before, during, and after World War II and contains extensive correspondence, clippings, manuscripts, reprints, pamphlets, handbills, photographs, and audio tapes. Her scholarly studies of German and Soviet Jews and the birth of Israel account for her correspondence with publishers such as the New York University Press and with Gratz College and their Holocaust Oral History Archives
L.I. (Anonymous) memoir by L. I. (Anonymous)( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Holocaust testimony of Agnes Adachi : transcript of audiotaped interview by Agnes Adachi( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Agnes Adachi, nee Mandl, was born in Budapest in 1918 into a non-religious family. She attended a Reformed Church School where she received some Hebrew instruction. For safety, just before the Nazi invasion, she was baptised. She worked at the Hotel Ritz and first felt open antisemitism at the end of 1942. Her father was taken by the Hungarian Arrow Cross and his Christian partner in a textile store appropriated the business. She was given asylum by the Swedish Embassy, where Szent-Gyorgyi was also a refugee, and worked there (with 350 other refugees) under Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg had her stop wearing the yellow badge, succeeded in the return of her apartment, and issued many hundreds of "Schutzpasses." She describes Wallenberg's wit and daring in dealing with Arrow Cross and German officers. She credits the Swiss Red Cross as well as the Swedish Red Cross for their aid. In 1945, after the war, ended, she was in Sweden, where she worked with Count Bernadotte as a teacher of refugees. She wonders how and why Wallenberg disappeared and deplores the incredulity of some influential people to whom she tried to describe Wallenberg's rescue work
Holocaust testimony of D.S. (Anonymous) : transcript of audiotaped interview by D. S. (Anonymous)( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

D.S., son of a Jewish baNker and a Protestant mother, was born in Berlin, Germany in 1928. He stayed in Berlin until 1948. He discusses his family's history, his education and how their life as Jews changed and became increasingly restricted after 1935. Non-Jewish relatives broke off contact until after the war ended. He briefly describes Kristallnacht. His father's business and property were confiscated. D.S. and his father were arrested and detained at Rosenstrasse for one week and saw the Rosenstrasse Action by non-Jewish spouses of the prisoners. His family was forced to move into rooms shared with two other families. After the Jewish schools were closed, D.S. worked for the Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Deutschland for several months until the entire staff was deported in vans. He was spared because of his non-Jewish mother and believes that this is why his father survived. He became bar mitzvah in 1941. D.S. and his father were assigned to a labor camp in Berlin in 1942. D.S. resisted the Germans through sabotage while in the labor unit and as a member of a small resistance group composed of young men from mixed marriages. He describes life during the Battle of Berlin and postwar under Russian occupation. D.S. completed his education in a German high school. He could no longer endure life in Germany and came to the United States in 1948, helped by HIAS. His parents remained in Germany, but his mother joined him after his father's death. D.S. cites personal encounters to prove Germans knew what happened to Jews in the camps as well as a few incidents of help from non-Jews. He talks about his feelings about Germans and his determination to fight antisemitism
Holocaust testimony of Arnold Miller : transcript of audiotaped interview by Arnold Miller( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Arnold Miller served in the 245th Combat Engineers of the United States Third Army in Austria. He went to Ebensee concentration camp, on his own, one day after it was liberated. A Jewish physician, who had served as a camp doctor, showed him the camp and told him about the brutal treatment of the prisoners. Mr. Miller vividly describes what he saw: prisoners who looked like walking skeletons, mass graves, and crematoria. Once the survivors realized he was Jewish, they told him their experiences. Later, he briefly stopped at a work camp for women and relates the testimony of a Russian soldier who had seen atrocities in Dachau and Auschwitz. Mr. Miller mentions his experiences while stationed in the Army of Occupation in Bavaria in 1945. Because he spoke their language, he had several interesting encounters with German citizens
Holocaust testimony of Ruth Kapp Hartz : transcript of audiotaped interview by Ruth Kapp Hartz( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ruth Hartz, nee Ruth Kapp, born in Palestine of German-Jewish parents in 1937, moved with her family to Paris in 1938. Although the family had affidavits for the U.S., their immigration was was disrupted by the American consulate. After the invasion of France 1940, they were sent with other non-French to Colombes, a sports stadium outside of Paris. Her father avoided deportation by joining the French Foreign Legion in Morocco. With the help of the resistance, Ruth and her mother fled to Normandy with false papers, hiding on a farm, then to Toulouse and Arthes near Albi in the French Free Zone, where her father joined them in 1942. She describes the kindness of people in the small towns toward the persecuted, their decency and political thinking but also the willingness of the French police and beauracracy to collaborate with the Nazis. She describes flight, hunger, and painful separation from her parents when she was hidden in a convent in Soréze. After one year, the family reunited and was helped with food and hiding by two generations of a Catholic family, with whom they remain in contact. After the war, the family moved to Paris. Ruth experienced antisemitism in school and later at the Sorbonne and found protection hiding her Jewishness as she had during the war. Joining the Jewish scouts (Les Éclaireurs) and WIZO reinforced her Jewish identity. She immigrated to the U.S. in 1958. Her biography, "Your name is Renee" by Stacy Cretzmeyer, was published in 1994 by Biddle Publishing Co
 
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The Jews in the Soviet Union since 1917 : paradox of survival
Alternative Names
Nora Levin Amerikaans schrijfster (1916-1989)

Nora Levin historiadora estadounidense

Nora Levin historienne américaine

לוין, נורה

לוין, נורה היסטוריונית אמריקאית

Languages
English (116)

Russian (2)

German (2)

Covers