WorldCat Identities

Dray, Philip

Overview
Works: 20 works in 92 publications in 2 languages and 10,555 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Juvenile works 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV6464, B
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Philip Dray
We are not afraid : the story of Goodman, Schwerner, and Chaney and the civil rights campaign for Mississippi by Seth Cagin( Book )

19 editions published between 1988 and 2006 in English and held by 1,781 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Describes the events surrounding the slayings of the civil rights workers, the investigation and discovery of the killers, and the trial
At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black America by Philip Dray( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,616 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A history of lynching in America describes its common use, especially in the southern United States, and discusses the crusade by a handful of black and white citizens to eliminate the shameful practice
Capitol men : the epic story of Reconstruction through the lives of the first Black congressmen by Philip Dray( Book )

6 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 1,474 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pulitzer Prize finalist Philip Dray shines a light on a little known group of men: the nation's first black members of Congress. These men played a critical role in pushing for much-needed reforms in the wake of a traumatic civil war, including public education for all children, equal rights, and protection from Klan violence. But they have been either neglected or maligned by most historians--their "glorious failure" chalked up to corruption and "ill-preparedness."--Publisher description
Stealing God's thunder : Benjamin Franklin's lightning rod and the invention of America by Philip Dray( Book )

6 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 1,420 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A biography of Benjamin Franklin viewed through the lens of his scientific inquiry and its ramifications for American democracy. Today we think of Franklin as a founder of American independence who also dabbled in science. But in Franklin's day it was otherwise--long before he was an eminent statesman, he was famous for his revolutionary scientific work, especially his experiments with lightning and electricity. Pulitzer Prize finalist Dray uses the evolution of Franklin's scientific curiosity and empirical thinking as a metaphor for America's struggle to establish its fundamental values. Set against the backdrop of the Enlightenment and America's pursuit of political equality for all, the book recounts how Franklin unlocked one of the greatest natural mysteries of his day.--From publisher description
There is power in a union : the epic story of labor in America by Philip Dray( Book )

9 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 1,322 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book is a history of American labor from the dawn of the industrial age to the present day. From the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts, the first real factories in America, to the triumph of unions in the twentieth-century and their waning influence today, the contest between labor and capital for their share of American bounty has shaped our national experience. Here the author's ambition is to show the vital accomplishments of organized labor in that time and illuminate its central role in our social, political, economic, and cultural evolution. This is an epic character-driven narrative that locates this struggle for security and dignity in all its various settings on picket lines and in union halls, jails, assembly lines, corporate boardrooms, the courts, the halls of Congress, and the White House. Here the author demonstrates the urgency of the fight for fairness and ecnomic democracy in a struggle that remains expecially urgent today when oridinary Americans are so anxious and beset by economic woes
Hollywood films of the seventies : sex, drugs, violence, rock 'n' roll & politics by Seth Cagin( Book )

6 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 739 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Yours for justice, Ida B. Wells : the daring life of a crusading journalist by Philip Dray( Book )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 675 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biography of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, a journalist and teacher who wrote about and spoke against the injustices suffered by African-Americans
Between earth and sky : how CFCs changed our world and endangered the ozone layer by Seth Cagin( Book )

8 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 643 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By the turn of the twentieth century, the American search for new frontiers led not West but toward a golden age of technology. The invention of the telephone, the electric light bulb, the airplane, and numerous other achievements of science and engineering inspired a faith that technology would always improve the human condition. This same confidence would fuel the drive for "better living through chemistry" that produced chlorofluorocarbons - or CFCs. Spanning six decades, the story of CFCs vividly portrays the unintended consequences of technological progress and the ongoing struggle to contain the threat to the global environment. The invention of chlorofluorocarbons in 1928 by General Motors scientist Thomas Midgley, Jr., was celebrated as a boon to humanity: CFCs made possible both the mass proliferation of air conditioning and refrigeration. By the 1950s CFCs had found further applications: as propellants in aerosol spray cans, in the manufacture of Styrofoam, and as vital industrial solvents. Then, in 1974, after millions of tons of CFCs had been released into the Earth's atmosphere, two scientists at the University of California demonstrated that these same "safe" wonder substances had altered the fundamental chemistry of the atmosphere and had begun to erode the ozone layer - the protective shield of all life on earth. The battle to restrict CFCs was fought in laboratories, at international conferences, and in the halls of Congress, pitting environmentalists intent on remedying what had become a global crisis against industrialists and government officials opposed to regulation. Finally, in 1987, fifty-seven nations signed the first global environmental treaty - the Montreal Protocol, which regulated the further production of CFCs and ushered in a new era of international cooperation on the environment. In chronicling the rise and fall of one of the first synthetic chemicals, Cagin and Dray recreate the excitement of the age of invention that spawned CFCs, chart the growth of the environmental movement and the vital laws its activists succeeded in passing, and trace our dawning awareness of the fragility of the global environment. A richly detailed work of social and scientific history, Between Earth and Sky is ultimately the story of how we have come to understand the high cost of progress
At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black America by Philip Dray( Book )

9 editions published between 2002 and 2007 in English and held by 401 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is easy to shrink from our country?s brutal history of lynching. Lynching is called the last great skeleton in our nation?s closet: It terrorized all of black America, claimed thousands upon thousands of victims in the decades between the 1880s and the Second World War, and leaves invisible but deep scars to this day. The cost of pushing lynching into the shadows, however?misremembering it as isolated acts perpetrated by bigots on society?s fringes?is insupportably high: Until we understand how pervasive and socially accepted the practice was?and, more important, why this was so?it will haunt all efforts at racial reconciliation."I could not suppress the thought," James Baldwin once recalled of seeing the red clay hills of Georgia on his first trip to the South, "that this earth had acquired its color from the blood that had dripped down from these trees." Throughout America, not just in the South, blacks accused of a crime?or merely of violating social or racial customs?were hunted by mobs, abducted from jails, and given summary "justice" in blatant defiance of all guarantees of due process under law. Men and women were shot, hanged, tortured, and burned, often in sadistic, picnic-like "spectacle lynchings" involving thousands of witnesses. "At the hands of persons unknown" was the official verdict rendered on most of these atrocities. The celebrated historian Philip Dray shines a clear, bright light on this dark history?its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. He also tells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and W.E.B. Du Bois. If lynching is emblematic of what is worst about America, their fight may stand for what is best: the love of justice and fairness and the conviction that one individual?s sense of right can suffice to defy the gravest of wrongs. This landmark book follows the trajectory of both forces over American history?and makes the history of lynching belong to us all. From the Hardcover edition
Born to be wild : Hollywood and the sixties generation by Seth Cagin( Book )

6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stealing God's thunder by Philip Dray( Recording )

6 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Franklin, more often viewed as a statesman and founding father, was also a man of science. Among his many inventions, it was the lightning rod--Franlkin's attempt to control the electricity of the heavens--that caused the greatest controversy. In a time where everything from weather to illness was blamed on sin, his device brought questions: "Did humanity have the right to defend itself ...? If so, how was such a new insight ... to be assimilated [with] faith?"
Yours for justice, Ida B. Wells the darling life of crusading journalist by Philip Dray( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This eloquent biography of anti-lynching crusader and journalist Ida B. Wells
Daughter of freedom : the life and times of Ida B. Wells by Philip Dray( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

<> by Philip Dray( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in Thai and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The brightest light : God, thunder, and Benjamin Franklin by Philip Dray( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Death and the newly-married lady by Philip Dray( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the vault subject series( Recording )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pacifica Radio has been chronicling 20th century political, cultural and artistic movements for over 60 years. The Pacifica Radio Archive is one of the oldest and deepest audio collections in the world, including documentaries, performances, discussions, debates, drama, poetry readings, commentaries and radio arts
Stealing God's thunder : Benjamin Franklin's lightning rod and the invention of America by Philip Dray( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black America by Philip Dray( Recording )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This ... account of lynching in America ... shines a ... light on American history's darkest stain - illuminating its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. [The author] also retells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and W.E.B. Du Bois. If lynching is emblematic of what is worst about America, their fight may stand for what is best: the commitment to justice and fairness and the conviction that one individual's sense of right can suffice to defy the gravest of wrongs.-Back cover
At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black America( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author discusses his book of the same title. The book chronicles the systematic lynching of African Americans from 1882 to 1952. The author argues that the white population used lynching as a means to maintain power over the black population
 
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At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black America
Alternative Names
Philip Dray American writer

드레이, 필립

Languages
English (89)

Thai (2)

Covers
At the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black AmericaCapitol men : the epic story of Reconstruction through the lives of the first Black congressmenStealing God's thunder : Benjamin Franklin's lightning rod and the invention of AmericaThere is power in a union : the epic story of labor in AmericaYours for justice, Ida B. Wells : the daring life of a crusading journalistAt the hands of persons unknown : the lynching of Black AmericaBorn to be wild : Hollywood and the sixties generationYours for justice, Ida B. Wells the darling life of crusading journalist