WorldCat Identities

Burnett, Anne Pippin 1925-

Overview
Works: 17 works in 151 publications in 4 languages and 6,426 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Drama  Tragedies (Drama)  Poetry  Tragicomedies 
Roles: Author, Editor, Translator
Classifications: PA3975.I6, 882.01
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Anne Pippin Burnett
Revenge in Attic and later tragedy by Anne Pippin Burnett( )

14 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 2,244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Moderns tend to view the drama of ancient Athens as a presentation of social or moral problems, as if ancient drama showed the same realism seen on the present-day stage. Because it was a state theater, the Attic stage is also supposed to have offered lessons in the peaceable virtues that the city required. Such views are belied by the plays themselves, in which supremely violent actions occur in a legendary time and place distinct both from reality and from the ethics of ordinary life." "We who live among tired and demystified political institutions are afraid that individuals unrestrained by the influence of the community may resort to crime and violence. Yet in an Attic vengeance play, a treacherous "criminal" triumphs over a victim. How could the city of Athens show its citizens Medea's murder of her children? Orestes' killing of his mother? Anne Burnett reveals a larger reality in these ancient plays, comparing them to later drama and finding in them forgotten and powerful meaning."--Jacket
Catastrophe survived: Euripides' plays of mixed reversal by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

30 editions published between 1971 and 1985 in English and Undetermined and held by 869 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pindar's songs for young athletes of Aigina by Anne Pippin Burnett( )

20 editions published between 2005 and 2012 in English and Greek, Ancient and held by 784 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Of the forty-six surviving victory odes of Pindar, eleven give praise to athletes from the island of Aigina in the Saronic Gulf. This book offers studies of those eleven songs, preceded by a brief survey of the island's history, a sketch of its peculiar aristocracy, and a description of the sculptural programme of its early fifth-century temple of Aphaia--because the author's concentration is always upon effects produced within the immediate audience when the odes were performed. As hosts or guests, members of a small commercial elite watched while dancers celebrated the athletic success of one of their own number, and the conditions of performance remained essentially unchanged from the 490s through the 460s BC, in spite of Aigina's gradual loss of power. The songs that Pindar supplied for these occasions invite a close consideration of the epinician mode, for all are ample in scale and complex in design, while at the same time all share a local awareness of the pediments of the Aphaia Temple and all (so it is argued) salute victors who are under 18 years of age. In addition, each performance displays a mythic marvel, and Anne Pippin Burnett argues that these segments of narrative are meant to bring a touch of performance to a worldly celebration, offering to the gathered masculine auditors imperishable proofs of their common identity. Burnett's overall concern is with Pindar's techniques for leading spectators into a shared experience of inspired success, but she is also alert to the historical realities of Greek athletic contest.--Book jacket
Three archaic poets : Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

32 editions published between 1983 and 2015 in 3 languages and held by 716 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studie over het werk van de Griekse dichters Archilochus (Parius ; 7e E. v. Chr.), Alcaeus (ca 620-ca 580 v.C.) en Sappho
Ion by Euripides( Book )

11 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 640 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

One of Euripides' late plays, Ion tells the story of Kreousa, queen of Athens, and her son by the god Apollo. Apollo raped Kreousa; she secretly abandoned their child, assuming thereafter that the god had allowed him to die. Ion, however, is saved to become a ward of Apollo's temple at Delphi. In the play, Kreousa and her husband Xouthos go to Delphi to seek a remedy for their childlessness; Apollo, speaking through his oracle, gives Ion to Xouthos as a son, enraging the apparently still childless Kreousa. Mother tries to kill son, son traps mother at an altar and is about to do her violence; just then, Apollo's priestess appears to reveal the birth tokens that permit Kreousa to recognize and embrace the child she thought she had lost forever. Ion must accept Apollo's duplicity along with his benevolence toward his son. Disturbing riptides of thought and feeling run just below the often shimmering surface of this masterpiece of Euripidean melodrama. Despite Ion's "happy ending," the concatenation of mistaken identities, failed intrigues, and misdirected violence enacts a gripping and serious drama. Euripides leaves the audience to come to terms with the shifting relations of god and mortals in his complex and equivocal interpretation of myth
Pindar by Anne Pippin Burnett( )

14 editions published between 2007 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 486 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Of all the lyric poets of ancient Greece, Pindar is the one whose work has been best preserved. His odes to victorious Greek athletes were entertainments designed for performance in a hospitable atmosphere of drinking, dining and jokes. The victor has known the favour of the god whose contest he entered, and has brought back pan-Hellenic fame to his family, friends and city. To extend this glory and make it permanent, he has commissioned a song of praise, had dancers trained to sing it, and summoned an audience of kinsmen, neighbours and friends to enjoy it." "Pindar's odes contain invocations and prayers, but their most characteristic effects are achieved through the depiction of fragments of myth. Anne Pippin Burnett argues that these passages were meant neither as mere decoration nor as moral instruction, but served rather as a dramatic mechanism by which dancers brough an experience of another world to guests gathered in the banqueting suite of the victor."--BOOK JACKET
The art of Bacchylides by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

12 editions published in 1985 in English and Greek, Modern and held by 477 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Odes for victorious athletes by Pindar( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Ancient Greece, the great poet Pindar composed many odes for victorious athletes. The typical Pindaric ode reflects three separate moments: the instant of success in contest, the victory night with its disorderly revels, and the actual banquet of family and friends where the commissioned poem is being offered as entertainment. In their essential effect, these songs transform a physical triumph, as experienced by one man, into a sense of elation shared by his peers -- men who have gathered to dine and to drink. Athletic odes were presented by small bands of dancing singers, influencing the audience with music and dance as well as by words. These translations respect the form of the originals, keeping the stanzas that shaped repeating melodies and danced figures and using rhythms meant to suggest performers in motion. Pindar's songs were meant to entertain and exalt groups of drinking men. These translations revive the confident excitement of their original performances
A catafalque for David Hill by Pasdeloup Press( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Odes for victorious athletes by Pindarus( Book )

6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

You've just won the gold medal, what are you going to do? In Ancient Greece, your patron could throw a feast in your honor and have a poet write a hymn of praise to you. The great poet Pindar composed many such odes for victorious athletes. Esteemed classicist Anne Pippin Burnett presents a fresh and exuberant translation of Pindar's victory songs. The typical Pindaric ode reflects three separate moments: the instant of success in contest, the victory night with its disorderly revels, and the actual banquet of family and friends where the commissioned poem is being offered as entertainment. In their essential effect, these songs transform a physical triumph, as experienced by one man, into a sense of elation shared by his peers - men who have gathered to dine and to drink. Athletic odes were presented by small bands of dancing singers, influencing the audience with music and dance as well as by words. These translations respect the form of the originals, keeping the stanzas that shaped repeating melodies and danced figures and using rhythms meant to suggest performers in motion. Pindar's songs were meant to entertain and exalt groups of drinking men. These translations revive the confident excitement of their original performances
Medea and the tragedy of revenge by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ion. A translation with commentary by Anne Pippin Burnett. With a series introd. by Eric A. Havelock by Euripides( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pentheus and Dionysus : host and guest by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ion by Herbert George Birch( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ion : by Euripides by Euripides( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Revenge in Attic and Later Tragedy (Sather classical lectures ; v. 62) by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human resistance and divine persuasion in Euripides' Ion by Anne Pippin Burnett( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Revenge in Attic and later tragedy
Covers
Pindar's songs for young athletes of AiginaPindarThe art of BacchylidesOdes for victorious athletesOdes for victorious athletes
Alternative Names
Anne Pippin Burnett American classical philologist

Anne Pippin Burnett Amerikaans klassiek filologe

Anne Pippin Burnett US-amerikanische Klassische Philologin

Burnett, Anne P.

Burnett, Anne P. 1925-

Burnett Anne P. 1925-2017

Pippin, Anne Burnett 1925-..

Pippin Burnett, Anne

Pippin Burnett, Anne 1925-

Pippin Burnett Anne 1925-2017

Languages