WorldCat Identities

Palmer, R. Barton 1946-

Overview
Works: 115 works in 513 publications in 2 languages and 25,498 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Film adaptations  History  Drama  Thrillers (Motion pictures)  Horror films  Poetry  Motion pictures  Biography  Reviews 
Roles: Editor, Author, Translator, Other, Author of introduction, Publishing director, win, wpr
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about R. Barton Palmer
 
Most widely held works by R. Barton Palmer
Traditions in world cinema by Linda Badley( )

18 editions published between 2005 and 2011 in English and held by 1,780 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book brings together a colourful and wide-ranging collection of world cinematic traditions all of which are in need of introduction, investigation and, in some cases, critical reassessment
Larger than life : movie stars of the 1950s by R. Barton Palmer( )

14 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and held by 1,685 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Larger Than Life offers a comprehensive view of the star system in 1950s Hollywood and also in-depth discussions of the decades major stars, including Montgomery Clift, Judy Holliday, Jerry Lewis, James Mason, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Bing Crosby, Gene Kelly, Jayne Mansfield, and Audrey Hepburn
A little solitaire : John Frankenheimer and American film by R. Barton Palmer( )

11 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,637 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Little Solitaire offers the only multidisciplinary critical account of Frankenheimer's oeuvre. Especially emphasized is his deep and passionate engagement with national politics and the irrepressible need of human beings to assert their rights and individuality in the face of organizations that would reduce them to silence and anonymity
Hitchcock at the source : the auteur as adaptor by David Boyd( )

12 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,551 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Featured in this book are 19 original essays, ranging across the entirety of Alfred Hitchcock's career, that consider the ways in which he adapted and transformed a variety of literary works - novels, plays, and short stories - into film
The philosophy of Steven Soderbergh( )

18 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 1,303 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the age of twenty-six, Steven Soderbergh launched his career in the film industry with astonishing success. His film sex, lies, and videotape (1989), which he wrote in only eight days, won the prestigious Palm d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, a bittersweet blessing that shaped high expectations for the young director. The film, also nominated for an Academy Award, is regarded by most film experts as a turning point in the history of American independent cinema. The Philosophy of Steven Soderbogh examines Soderbergh's full body of work, from films that brought him commercial success such as Erin Brockovich (2000), to more controversial films such as The Limey (1999), which put his name among the ranks of such celebrated filmmakers as the Coen brothers, David Lynch, and Orson Welles. Editors R. Barton Palmer and Steven M. Sanders introduce readers to the imaginative storylines, philosophically salient themes, and inventive approaches to filmmaking that distinguish Soderbergh's work. Expert scholars analyze Soderbergh's films individually, exploring topics such as the nature of reality in Solaris (2002); the heritage of Enlightenment thought in Schizopolis (1996); guilt, punishment, and redemption in The Limey (1999); altruism in Erin Brockovich (2000); truth, knowledge, and ethics in sex, lies, and videotape (1989); politics as reality and fiction in K Street (2004); and Kantian ethics, performance, and agency in Traffic (2000) and the Ocean's trilogy (2001-2007). Like the Coens and David Lynch, Soderbergh places emphasis on character over narrative, self-conscious stylistic display and visual exuberance, and a deep, often disturbing engagement with the problematic aspects of the human condition. His films take on a variety of cinematic forms, often by joining the traditions of film noir and crime cinema with European styles and themes. By consistently challenging the viewer to question the foundations of knowledge, understanding, and reality, Soderbergh's films have played a significant role in the advancement of American art cinema. R. Barton Palmer Is Calhoun Lemon Professor of Literature at Clemson University and the author or editor of many books. Steven M. Sanders, professor emeritus of philosophy at Bridgewater State University --Book Jacket
Hollywood's Tennessee : the Williams films and postwar America by R. Barton Palmer( )

14 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,160 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"No American dramatist has had more plays adapted than Tennessee Williams, and few modern dramatists have witnessed as much controversy during the adaptation process. His Hollywood legacy, captured in such screen adaptations as A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Suddenly, Last Summer, reflects the sea change in American culture in the mid-twentieth century. Placing this body of work within relevant contexts ranging from gender and sexuality to censorship, modernism, art cinema, and the Southern Renaissance, Hollywood's Tennessee draws on rarely examined archival research to recast Williams's significance." "Providing not only cultural context, the authors also bring to light the details of the arduous screenwriting process Williams experienced, with special emphasis on the Production Code Administration - the powerful censorship office that drew high-profile criticism during the 1950s - and Williams's innovative efforts to bend the code. Going well beyond the scripts themselves, Hollywood's Tennessee showcases findings culled from poster and billboard art, pressbooks, and other production and advertising material. The result is a sweeping account of how Williams's adapted plays were crafted, marketed, and received, as well as the lasting implications of this history for commercial filmmakers and their audiences."--Jacket
Nineteenth-century American fiction on screen by R. Barton Palmer( )

14 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 955 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The process of translating works of literature to the silver screen is a rich field of study for both students and scholars of literature and cinema. The fourteen essays collected in this 2007 volume provide a survey of the important films based on, or inspired by, nineteenth-century American fiction, from James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans to Owen Wister's The Virginian. Many of the major works of the American canon are included, including The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick and Sister Carrie. The starting point of each essay is the literary text itself, moving on to describe specific aspects of the adaptation process, including details of production and reception. Written in a lively and accessible style, the book includes production stills and full filmographies. Together with its companion volume on twentieth-century fiction, the volume offers a comprehensive account of the rich tradition of American literature on screen
Michael Mann : cinema and television : interviews, 1980-2012 by Michael Mann( )

6 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 894 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This reader is the first to bring together a selection of Mann's own interviews where he reflects on his film and television productions. The sixteen interviews provide historical context, interpretation and evaluation of the auteur's work. They encompass his entire career as a feature filmmaker and television producer/director as he and others reflect on his themes, working methods, artistic development and career achievements. The book aims to open up Mann's body of work, making it available for comparison with the work of his contemporaries, and to provide fresh insights into his film and television work. A substantive introductory essay, chronology and filmography provide additional bases for understanding the interviews, essays and work of this major filmmaker. -- Provided by publisher
Hollywood's dark cinema : the American film noir by R. Barton Palmer( Book )

10 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 832 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With this background of studio system production in place, Palmer traces the advent of the film noir in the cold light of industry aims, target audiences, censorship, and the role Hollywood played in American society. In subsequent chapters, he investigates the film noir in all its guises: the crime melodrama, the detective film, the thriller, and the woman's picture
International noir( )

11 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in English and held by 808 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Following World War II, film noir became the dominant cinematic expression of Cold War angst, influencing new trends in European and Asian filmmaking. International Noir examines film noir's influence on the cinematic traditions of Britain, France, Scandinavia, Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, and India.This book suggests that the film noir style continues to appeal on such a global scale because no other cinematic form has merged style and genre to effect a vision of the disturbing consequences of modernity. International noir has, however, adapted and adopted noir themes and aesthetic elements so that national cinemas can boast an independent and indigenous expression of the genre. Ranging from Japanese silent films and women's films to French, Hong Kong, and Nordic New Waves, this book also calls into question critical assessments of noir in international cinemas. In short, it challenges prevailing film scholarship to renegotiate the concept of noir. Ending with an examination of Hollywood's neo-noir recontextualization of the genre, and post-noir's reinvigorating critique of this aesthetic, International Noir offers Film Studies scholars an in-depth commentary on this influential global cinematic art form, further offering extensive bibliography and filmographies for recommended reading and viewing.--Amazon.com
After Hitchcock : influence, imitation, and intertextuality( )

9 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 785 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alfred Hitchcock is arguably the most famous director to have ever made a film. Almost single-handedly he turned the suspense thriller into one of the most popular film genres of all time, while his Psycho updated the horror film and inspired two generations of directors to imitate and adapt this most Hitchcockian of movies. Yet while much scholarly and popular attention has focused on the director's oeuvre, until now there has been no extensive study of how Alfred Hitchcock's films and methods have affected and transformed the history of the film medium. In this book, thirteen original essays by leading film scholars reveal the richness and variety of Alfred Hitchcock's legacy as they trace his shaping influence on particular films, filmmakers, genres, and even on film criticism. Some essays concentrate on films that imitate Hitchcock in diverse ways, including the movies of Brian de Palma and thrillers such as True Lies, The Silence of the Lambs, and Dead Again. Other essays look at genres that have been influenced by Hitchcock's work, including the 1970s paranoid thriller, the Italian giallo film, and the post-Psycho horror film. The remaining essays investigate developments within film culture and academic film study, including the enthusiasm of French New Wave filmmakers for Hitchcock's work, his influence on the filmic representation of violence in the post-studio Hollywood era, and the ways in which his films have become central texts for film theorists
Thinking in the dark : cinema, theory, practice by Murray Pomerance( )

10 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 755 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Today's film scholars draw from a dizzying range of theoretical perspectives - they're just as likely to cite philosopher Gilles Deleuze as they are to quote classic film theorist Andre Bazin. To students first encountering them, these theoretical lenses for viewing film can seem exhilarating, but also overwhelming. Thinking in the Dark introduces readers to twenty-one key theorists whose work has made a great impact on film scholarship today, including Rudolf Arnheim, Sergei Eisenstein, Michel Foucault, Siegfried Kracauer, and Judith Butler. Rather than just discussing each theorist's ideas in the abstract, the book shows how those concepts might be applied when interpreting specific films by including an analysis of both a classic film and a contemporary one. It thus demonstrates how theory can help us better appreciate films from all eras and genres: from Hugo to Vertigo, from City Lights to Sunset Blvd., and from Young Mr. Lincoln to A.I. and Wall-E . The volume's contributors are all experts on their chosen theorist's work and, furthermore, are skilled at explaining that thinker's key ideas and terms to readers who are not yet familiar with them
Twentieth-century American fiction on screen by R. Barton Palmer( Book )

14 editions published between 2006 and 2010 in English and held by 732 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The essays in this collection analyse major film adaptations of twentieth-century American fiction, from F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon to Toni Morrison's Beloved. Combining cinematic and literary approaches, this volume explores the adaptation process from conception through production and reception. Written in a lively and accessible style, the book includes production stills and full filmographies. Together with its companion volume on nineteenth-century fiction, the volume offers a comprehensive account of the rich tradition of
Shot on location : postwar American cinema and the exploration of real place by R. Barton Palmer( )

7 editions published in 2016 in English and Undetermined and held by 725 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the early days of filmmaking, before many of Hollywood's elaborate sets and soundstages had been built, it was common for movies to be shot on location. Decades later, Hollywood filmmakers rediscovered the practice of using real locations and documentary footage in their narrative features. Why did this happen? What caused this sudden change? Renowned film scholar R. Barton Palmer answers this question in Shot on Location by exploring the historical, ideological, economic, and technological developments that led Hollywood to head back outside in order to capture footage of real places. His groundbreaking research reveals that wartime newsreels had a massive influence on postwar Hollywood film. Considering how these practices were used in everything from war movies like Twelve O'Clock High to westerns like The Searchers, Palmer explores how the blurring of the formal boundaries between cinematic journalism and fiction lent a "reality effect" to otherwise implausible stories. Shot on Location describes how the period's greatest directors, from Alfred Hitchcock to Billy Wilder, increasingly moved beyond the confines of the studio. At the same time, the book acknowledges the collaborative nature of moviemaking, and thus offers a fascinating behind-the-scene look at how Hollywood transformed the way we view real spaces. -- Provided by publisher
Invented lives, imagined communities : the biopic and American national identity by William H Epstein( )

11 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and Undetermined and held by 640 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Biopics--films that chronicle the lives of famous and notorious figures from our national history--have long been one of Hollywood's most popular and important genres, offering viewers various understandings of American national identity. Invented Lives, Imagined Communities provides the first full-length examination of US biopics, focusing on key releases in American cinema while treating recent development in three fields: cinema studies, particularly the history of Hollywood; national identity studies dealing with the American experiences; and scholarship devoted to modernity and postmodernity. Films discussed include Houdini, Patton, The Great White Hope, Bound for Glory, Ed Wood, Basquiat, Pollock, Sylvia, Kinsey, Fur, Milk, J. Edgar, and Lincoln, and the book pays special attention to the crucial generic plot along which biopics traverse and showcase American lives, even as they modify the various notions of the national character"--Page [4] of cover
Joel and Ethan Coen by R. Barton Palmer( Book )

10 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 611 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"With landmark films such as Fargo, O Brother Where art Thou?, Blood Simple, and Raising Arizona, the Coen brothers have achieved both critical and commercial success. Proving the existence of a viable market for "small" films that are also intellectually rewarding, their work has exploded generic conventions amid rich webs of transtextural references. In Joel and Ethan Coen, R. Barton Palmer argues that the Coen oeuvre also forms a central element in what might be called postmodernist filmmaking. Mixing high and low cultural sources and blurring genres like noir and comedy, the use of pastiche and anti-realist elements in films such as The Hudsucker Proxy and Barton Fink clearly fit the postmodernist paradigm. Palmer argues that for a full understanding of the Coen brothers unique position within film culture, it is important to see how they have developed a new type of text within general postmodernist practice that Palmer terms commercial/independent. Analyzing their substantial body of work from this "generic" framework is the central focus on this book."--Book cover
Hitchcock's moral gaze by R. Barton Palmer( )

7 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 605 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his essays and interviews, Alfred Hitchcock was guarded about substantive matters of morality, preferring instead to focus on discussions of technique. That has not, however, discouraged scholars and critics from trying to work out what his films imply about such moral matters as honesty, fidelity, jealousy, courage, love, and loyalty. Through discussions and analyses of such films as Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Frenzy, the contributors to this book strive to throw light on the way Hitchcock depicts a moral--if not amoral or immoral--world. Drawing on perspectives from film studies, philosophy, literature, and other disciplines, they offer new and compelling interpretations of the filmmaker's moral gaze and the inflection point it provides for modern cinema. --
The philosophy of Michael Mann by STEVEN SANDERS( )

8 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 419 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Known for restoring vitality and superior craftsmanship to the crime thriller, American filmmaker Michael Mann has long been regarded as a talented triple threat capable of moving effortlessly between television and feature films as a writer, director, and executive producer. His unique visual sense and thematic approach are evident in the Emmy Award-winning The Jericho Mile (1979), the cult favorite The Keep (1983), the American epic The Last of the Mohicans (1992), and the Academy Award-nominated The Insider (1999) as well as his most recent works -- Ali (2001), Miami Vice (2006), and Public
Seconds( Visual )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 407 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A sinister thriller from the fractured 1960s that concerns a middle-aged businessman dissatisfied with his suburban existence, who is urged (and blackmailed) to undergo a strange and elaborate procedure that will grant him a new life as a reborn
The judgment of the King of Bohemia = Le jugement dou roy de Behaingne by Guillaume( Book )

9 editions published in 1984 in English and French, Old and held by 401 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The philosophy of Steven Soderbergh
Covers
Larger than life : movie stars of the 1950sA little solitaire : John Frankenheimer and American filmHitchcock at the source : the auteur as adaptorThe philosophy of Steven SoderberghHollywood's Tennessee : the Williams films and postwar AmericaNineteenth-century American fiction on screenHollywood's dark cinema : the American film noirAfter Hitchcock : influence, imitation, and intertextuality
Alternative Names
Barton Palmer, R. 1946-

Barton Palmer, Richard 1946-

Palmer, Barton 1946-

Palmer, R. B. 1946-

Palmer, Richard Barton 1946-

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