WorldCat Identities

United States Defense Science Board

Overview
Works: 245 works in 367 publications in 1 language and 7,726 library holdings
Classifications: UA23, 363.32
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about United States
 
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Most widely held works by United States
Task force report : resilient military systems and the advanced cyber threat by United States( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 272 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of Joint Defense Science Board, Intelligence Science Board Task Force on integrating sensor-collected intelligence( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on time critical conventional strike from strategic standoff by United States( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Time critical conventional strike from long standoff ranges into restricted or denied territory has been an operational, policy, and acquisition challenge for a long time. In situations in which time is not a factor and/or in which sufficient U.S. forces are deployed nearby, the U.S. has demonstrated its ability to strike at identified threats effectively. However, in situations in which time is a factor and no nearby forces are present, only two options are currently available-- nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile systems(ICBMs)/submarine/sea-launched ballistic missile systems (SLBMs) or no military action. This report recommends a course of action to ensure that there is an appropriate, effective time critical conventional strike option in place
Report of the Joint Defense Science Board/Threat Reduction Advisory Committee Task Force on the Nuclear Weapons Effects National Enterprise by United States( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report offers important considerations regarding the state of the nuclear weapons effects enterprise and the need for leadership awareness and intervention. Nuclear weapons remain a serious threat to our nation's security. The nation's capability to deter against this threat and provide assurance to our allies requires that US nuclear and conventional forces are able to operate in a nuclear environment. Unfortunately, the nation's expertise and capability to operate in a nuclear environment have decayed. As a result the Department of Defense and the nation are not as well prepared as it should be to deter, defend, and mitigate an attack. This study serves to renew attention on the nation's nuclear weapons effects enterprise. It offers recommendations for rebuilding critical capabilities, for improved collaboration throughout government stakeholders, and for enhanced attention at the leadership level
Defense imperatives for the new administration : report of the Defense Science Board by United States( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Challenges to military operations in support of U.S. interests : report of the Defense Science Board 2007 summer study by United States( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Department of Defense biological safety and security program( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines the biological safety, security, and personnel reliability programs of DoD's biological labs, and compares these labs with other similar operations in academia, industry, and the federal government. Offers recommendations for improvements in the DoD program based on this comparison
Defense Science Board Task Force on Directed Energy Weapons : final report( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Directed energy continues to offer promise as a transformational game changer as the Department of Defense (DOD) encounters new asymmetric and disruptive threats, while facing increasingly sophisticated traditional challenges. Yet years of investment have not resulted in any currently operational high-energy laser capability. In addition, the single high-energy laser program of record, the Airborne Laser (ABL) for boost phase missile defense, continues to experience delays and potential budget reductions. There is a strong belief in the directed energy community, and in segments of the warfighter and force-provider communities, that highpower microwave (HPM) offers capabilities in anti-sensor applications and as non-lethal weapons. Still, HPM advancement has been limited by uncertainty about its effects and effectiveness. Years of major investment in chemical lasers has produced megawatt-class systems that could have a wide range of applications. However, size, weight, and logistics issues limit them to integration on large platforms, such as the 747 used for the ABL program, or fixed ground applications such as the Ground-Based Laser for Space Control. As a consequence, interest in these systems and expectations of progress has significantly decreased. The current focus is on solid state lasers with the promise of providing for smaller, lighter systems with deep magazines. However, the current goal for solid state laser development would provide a power level more than an order of magnitude lower than current chemical lasers. While beam quality and other factors can compensate for some of the difference in power level, there is currently little investment in those aspects. Further, these cannot make up the delta in power of chemical vs. solid state lasers. The near-term projection for solid state lasers is a power level closer to two orders of magnitude below that of chemical lasers
Enhancing adaptability of U.S. military forces by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defense Science Board 2005 summer study on reducing vulnerabilities to weapons of mass destruction( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reducing U.S. vulnerabilities to weapons of mass destruction is a topic of great importance to the nation's security. The technology of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has proliferated in the past decade as information and capabilities have become more accessible. Thus, actions to prevent such an attack should have high priority for the U.S. government and the Department of Defense. Why is the threat from weapons of mass destruction so important today? After all, the United States faced the potential of massive destruction from nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union for nearly half a century during the Cold War. The principle answer lies in the uniqueness of the security environment today. The growing spread of weapons of mass destruction provides small groups of individuals with the ability to deliver devastating harm to the United States. Such power, in the past, could only be delivered by nation-states with large economic, political, industrial, military, and social resources. Furthermore, these resources were valued by nation-states and could be readily held at risk making such policies as mutually assured destruction effective in dealing with the threat
Report of the Defense Science Board 2008 summer study on capability surprise : volume one : main report by United States( )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Addresses the issue of capability surprise-- what it is, why it happens, what can be done to reduce the potential for its occurrence, and how to better prepare the Department of Defense (DOD) and the nation to respond appropriately
Defense Science Board 2003 summer study on : DoD roles and missions in homeland security( )

5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report identifies capabilities and initiatives needed by DoD to fulfill its responsibilities to project force when directed and to protect the homeland. It focuses on those capabilities that depend upon DoD working closely with other agencies. In addition, opportunities are identified for DoD to "export" some of its core competencies to help accelerate the maturation of the many agencies involved in homeland security task."
Defense Science Board study on unmanned aerial vehicles and uninhabited combat aerial vehicles by United States( )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lessons from recent combat experiences in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq have shown that UAVs can provide vastly improved acquisition and more rapid dissemination of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) data. They are one of the principal contributors to successful outcomes for the United States in these campaigns. The benefits and promise offered by UAVs in surveillance, targeting and attack have captured the attention of senior military and civilian officials in the Defense Department (DoD), members of Congress, and the public alike. Indeed, these recent combat operations appear to indicate that unmanned air systems have at last come of age
Protecting the homeland : report of the Defense Science Board by United States( )

in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defense Science Board 2004 summer study on transition to and from hostilities by United States( )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 234 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is clear from recent experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq that the United States must expect to encounter significant challenges in its future stabilization and reconstruction efforts -- efforts that seek to ensure stability, democracy, human rights, and a productive economy in a nation of concern. Achieving these ends will require effective planning and preparations in the years before the outbreak of hostilities, as well as employment, in the period following hostilities, of capabilities that are not traditional to U.S. Armed Forces. The Defense Science Board (DSB) was asked to consider the transition to and from hostilities to enhance U.S. effectiveness across this spectrum of activities from peacetime through stabilization and reconstruction. They considered what activities should be undertaken in peacetime with the objective of avoiding large-scale hostilities by better orchestrating all the instruments of U.S. power. And, failing in that aim, what activities should be undertaken in peacetime to be more successful in the stabilization and reconstruction operations that commonly follow large-scale hostilities operations critical for achieving U.S. political goals, not just military goals. The task force vision for enhancing U.S. effectiveness in the transition to and from hostilities has two dimensions. The first dimension is management discipline. The management discipline used by the military services to plan and prepare for combat operations must be extended to peacetime activities, to stabilization and reconstruction operations, and to intelligence - not only in DOD, but across the government. The second dimension is building and maintaining certain fundamental capabilities, now lacking, that are critical to success in stabilization and reconstruction. These capabilities are stabilization and reconstruction; strategic communication; knowledge, understanding, and intelligence; and identification, location, and tracking for asymmetric warfare
Defense science board report on advanced computing by United States( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the final report of the DSB Task Force on NNSA's Strategic Plan for Advanced Computing. The Task Force was asked to evaluate NNSA's strategic plan for Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) and its adequacy to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), whose mission is to ensure the safety, performance and reliability of our Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The Task Force was also asked to evaluate the role of ASC in maintaining US leadership in advanced computing and assess the impact of using ASC's capabilities for broader national security and other issues. The Task Force concluded that, since the cessation of nuclear testing, ASC has taken on the principal integrating role in assuring the long term safety and reliability of the stockpile. It is also an essential tool in addressing specific stockpile issues. Furthermore, ASC has played a leadership role in reestablishing US leadership in high performance computing. The use of ASC and ASC-derived technology for other national security, scientific, and commercial applications has also increased dramatically, and high performance computing is viewed as an extremely valuable and cost-effective approach to many of the user's important problems. However, it is not likely that ASC will meet the compelling goals stated in its roadmaps and planning documents at the currently projected levels of funding. Furthermore, the high end of the US computing industry may be negatively impacted with implications for the much broader range of potential users in the DOD, other federal agencies, and the commercial world. Accordingly, the Task Force strongly recommends sizing the budget of ASC to meet its nuclear weapons objectives and retain US leadership in advanced computing
Defense Science Board 2006 summer study on 21st century strategic technology vectors( )

in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Task force on cyber deterrence by United States( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 225 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defense Science Board report on the adequacy of the DoD Science & Technology (S & T) Program by United States( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 225 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.46 (from 0.36 for Oral histo ... to 1.00 for Defense Sc ...)

Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States. Defense Manufacturing Board

controlled identityUnited States. Department of Defense

controlled identityUnited States. Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering

controlled identityUnited States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology

controlled identityUnited States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics

DSB

United States. Department of Defense. Defense Science Board

United States. Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering. Defense Science Board

United States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology. Defense Science Board

United States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics. Defense Science Board

Languages
English (75)