WorldCat Identities

ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Overview
Works: 505 works in 900 publications in 2 languages and 25,832 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education
 
Most widely held works by ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education
Early childhood research quarterly by National Association for the Education of Young Children( )

in English and held by 1,122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Early childhood research & practice : ECRP( )

in English and held by 538 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Intended for researchers, teacher educators, program planners, policy- and decision-makers, administrators, practitioners, and parents. Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) features articles relating to thedevelopment, care, and education of children from birth to approximately age 8
ERIC/EECE newsletter by ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education( )

in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Self-Regulation and School Readiness by Clancy Blair( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 202 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Self-regulation of behavior generally refers to controlled, cognitive monitoring of the actions and steps required to obtain a goal, or to bring about a desired response from the environment. Age-related changes in self-regulation as well as individual differences at a given age or developmental stage play fundamental roles in shaping children's experiences and the responses children elicit from caregivers and others. However individual differences in children's temperamental emotional reactivity and the ability to control this reactivity are also important for understanding developing self regulation. This Digest focuses on emotional reactivity and its relation to the development of cognitive functions that promote self-regulation in young children. The Digest examines how emotions may influence the development of the cognitive functions that contribute to successful self-regulation and thereby to school readiness. Implications for caregivers are then detailed, including the following: (1) high quality preschool education programs can best promote school readiness by helping to secure the social and emotional foundation upon which children can build cognitive skills; and (2) preschool activities that exercise impulse control, sustained attention, and working memory are likely to promote the development of cognitive skills important for knowledge acquisition in the early elementary grades. (Contains 13 references.) (HTH)
Young Children's Emotional Development and School Readiness by C. Cybele Raver( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The current emphasis on children's academic preparedness continues to overshadow the importance of children's social and emotional development for school readiness. This Digest presents a brief overview of longitudinal research linking children's emotional development to school readiness and early childhood success, and then discusses interventions designed for children entering school. Specifically, the Digest notes, emerging research on early schooling suggests that the relationships that children build with peers and teachers are based on children's ability to regulate emotions in prosocial versus antisocial ways and that those relationships then serve as a "source of provisions" that either help or hurt children's chances of doing well academically. Children's early academic skills and emotional adjustment may be bidirectionally related, so that young children who struggle with early reading and learning difficulties may grow increasingly frustrated and more disruptive. Interventions to help address or avoid such problems include low-intensity interventions in the classroom; low- to moderate-intensity intervention in the homespecifically parent training programs; "multi-pronged" home/school interventions for children at moderate risk; and high-intensity clinical interventions for high-risk children. The Digest concludes with cautions that explain variation in programmatic success: (1) programmatic success is reliant in great measure on the extent to which they enlist family participation; (2) it may be unreasonable to expect long-term emotional and behavioral gains on the part of young children if their families continue to face chronic, structural stressors that erode children's psycho-social health; and (3) the economic, employment, and policy contexts of high-risk families have changed substantially from the conditions under which many models of interventions were originally designed and implemented over 20 years ago. (Contains 24 references.) (HTH)
El recreo en la escuela primaria Que indica la investigacion? by Olga Seastrom Jarrett( )

2 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Compared to the rest of the school day, recess is a time when children have more freedom to choose what they want to do and with whom. In light of the current climate of school accountability, this Spanish-language Digest discusses research on recess and its relationship to learning, social development, and child health, as well as research on related topics that have implications for recess policy such as the need for breaks and physical activity. The Digest reviews the relationships between recess and learning, recess and social development, and recess and child health noting that available research suggests that recess can play an important role in these three areas of development. The Digest calls for further research to assess the effects of "no recess" policies, how often recess breaks should occur, and how much involvement/guidance is needed from adult supervisors. (HTH)
Recess in Elementary School What Does the Research Say? by Olga Seastrom Jarrett( )

2 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Compared to the rest of the school day, recess is a time when children have more freedom to choose what they want to do and with whom. In light of the current climate of school accountability, this digest discusses research on recess and its relationship to learning, social development, and child health, as well as research on related topics that have implications for recess policy such as the need for breaks and physical activity. It also reviews the relationships between recess and learning, recess and social development, and recess and child health noting that available research suggests that recess can play an important role in these three areas of development. The digest calls for further research to assess the effects of "no recess" policies, how often recess breaks should occur, and how much involvement/guidance is needed from adult supervisors. (HTH)
Perspectives on charter schools : a review for parents by Saran Donahoo( )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recently, charter schools have gained popularity with parents, students, and others as alternatives to public schools, but what are charter schools and what effects are they having? This digest defines charter schools and clarifies some of the administrative and legal details surrounding such schools. The digest also lays out some of the potential benefits of and problems with charter schools, distinguishing commentary on charter schools from research on them, which is sparse. Proponents of charter schools say that charter schools increase parents' school choice and compel public schools to make improvements they otherwise might not make. Opponents argue that charter schools divert public monies that should be used to improve urban and rural public schools in low-income communities. Opponents also say that many charter schools are financially unstable. The Digest also highlights some research findings concerning issues such as academic achievement, parent satisfaction, and provisions for special education. (Contains 18 references.) (OR)
La calidad del cuidado infantil Un resumen para padres (Child Care Quality: An Overview for Parents) by Peggy Patten( )

2 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many parents want to know how important the quality of care is to children's social, emotional, and academic development. This Digest synthesizes some major recent research on child care quality. First, the Digest explains what features contribute to quality of care. The Digest also explains the differences between studies of how quality is related to child outcomes. Correlation studies observe the extent to which high-quality features "predict" better outcomes, while experimental studies try to find whether or not high-quality features "cause" better outcomes. The Digest notes that few researchers have found causal relationships between quality of child care and child outcomes. Some notable exceptions have been found for high-risk children living in poverty, for whom high-quality care has substantial, long-lasting, positive effects. Still, most studies find only a modest correlation between quality and outcomes. Certain family characteristics seem to be more closely correlated with better outcomes than is quality of child care, suggesting that positive outcomes may actually stem more from those family characteristics than from high-quality care. Furthermore, several studies have found a shortage of high-quality child care in the United States. This Digest offers some suggestions parents should take into account when trying to make the best choices of available options. (Contains 14 references.) (OBR)
Enriquecimiento del horario extra-escolar de los ninos = Enriching children's out-of-school time by Lillian Coltin( )

1 edition published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Otra perspectiva sobre lo que los ninos deben estar aprendiendo = Another look at what young children should be learning by Lilian G Katz( )

3 editions published in 2000 in Spanish and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Easing the teasing : how parents can help their children by Judy S Freedman( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focus on after-school time for violence prevention by Peggy Patten( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Perhaps 8 million children spend the after-school hours at home alone. In the absence of adult supervision, many of these youths are likely to engage in delinquent or other high-risk activities. Research suggests that after-school programs can help to prevent youths from engaging in these activities in two ways: by providing constructive activities for youths, and by encouraging the development of constructive adult-child relationships. There are a variety of after-school programs available to parents. However, when parents do not or cannot enroll their children in after-school activities, research suggests that it is especially important for parents to be engaged in their child's life. (OR)
Computers and young children by Susan W Haugland( )

4 editions published in 2000 in English and Spanish and held by 188 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Whether we use technology with young children--and if so, how--are critical issues facing early childhood educators and parents. This Spanish-language digest points out that many researchers do not recommend that children under 3 years old use computers. The digest also notes that many educators use computers with young children in ways that are developmentally inappropriate. However, developmentally appropriate ways to use computers with 3- and 4-year-olds are different from the ways we use computers in kindergarten and the primary grades. Research has shown that the cognitive and social benefits of providing computers to young children vary depending upon the kind of computer experiences offered. The digest suggests, as a first step to integrating computers in classrooms, organizing a study group of all the individuals who have expressed interest in children using computers, then summarizing the benefits of using computers with young children and discussing goals for the year, including the cost of computers and teacher training. The digest identifies four critical components of teacher training: practical experience, workshops, models and mentors, and supervisory follow-up. (LPP)
Working with culturally & linguistically diverse families by Deborah A Bruns( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 188 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

During the 1990s, there was heightened awareness among early childhood researchers of the need to examine efforts to provide programs and services responsive to the needs and preferences of families of young children from diverse cultural and linguistic groups. This Digest presents strategies supported by the research literature to enhance interactions with families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. After discussing issues involved in the development of relationships between professionals and the families they serve, the Digest suggests the following strategies for working with families: (1) respect the uniqueness of each family system; (2) develop a personalized relationship with families; (3) communicate in culturally appropriate ways; (4) recruit staff who view diversity as an asset; (5) create alliances with cultural guides; and (6) evaluate process and outcomes. (Contains 12 references.) (LPP)
Multiage grouping and academic achievement by Susan J Kinsey( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Noting that multiage classes during the elementary school years have been an option of educational practice in the United States since the introduction of graded education in the 19th century, this digest discusses the research on multiage education and its impact on academic achievement. Despite inconsistencies in research findings, those studies that report significant achievement outcomes for students in multiage classrooms over those in single-age classes demonstrate gains in language (including vocabulary and literacy measures) and mathematics. The key to interpreting research outcomes may be how multiage is defined. The digest points out that the academic benefits demonstrated for students in multiage classrooms may be the result of the classroom teacher's active facilitation and encouragement of cross-age learning opportunities. Widespread acceptance of the multiage model in elementary schools is unlikely until it is clear that multiage education leads to greater academic achievement. If careful attention is given to definition and selection of multiage classrooms, and detailed descriptions of classroom procedures are provided, research outcomes may reliably indicate which specific aspects of multiage classroom practices are most beneficial. (Contains 16 references.) (HTH)
Pretend play and young children's development by Doris Bergen( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluando la competencia social en los ninos = Assessing young children's social competence by Diane E McClellan( )

2 editions published in 2001 in Spanish and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic effects of after-school programs by Lee Shumow( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The current emphasis on performance standards and testing has led schools to look to the after-school hours as time that can be spent developing children's academic skills. This digest describes types of after-school programs and discusses recent research on who participates and the effects of participation on children's school performance. The digest points out that after-school programs are sponsored and operated by many different groups, and that the programs vary in terms of their philosophy, goals, and programming. The digest then highlights research indicating that children from high-risk backgrounds have both the most to gain from after-school programs in terms of educational opportunity and the least access to after-school programs. The digest concludes by asserting that if educational benefits are the goal of after-school programs, attention needs to be focused on the quality of programs and the activities that are offered. (Contains 11 references.) (LPP)
Reggio Emilia : impulsor del dialogo y del cambio by Rebecca Staples New( )

2 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.43 (from 0.27 for ERIC Clear ... to 0.52 for Easing the ...)

Alternative Names

controlled identityUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Clearinghouse on Early Education and Parenting

E.R.I.C. Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Educational Resources Information Center Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Educational Resources Information Center (Spojené státy americké) Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Educational Resources Information Center (U.S.) Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Educational Resources Information Center Washington, DC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

EECE

ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education

ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana, Ill

ERIC EECE

Languages
English (51)

Spanish (12)