WorldCat Identities

Barnhardt, Ray

Overview
Works: 42 works in 76 publications in 1 language and 803 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference papers and proceedings  Cross-cultural studies 
Roles: Author, Editor, Thesis advisor
Classifications: E97.65.A4, 371.8299710798
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ray Barnhardt
Alaska native education : views from within( Book )

5 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sharing our pathways : native perspectives on education in Alaska( Book )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of essays that discuss the education of Native Americans in Alaska
Education and development : lessons from the Third World( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cross-cultural issues in Alaskan education( Book )

in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contain papers focusing on educational policy, educational development, community/school issues and teaching/learning issues relating to native people in Alaska
Study of Alaska rural systemic reform : final report by James W Kushman( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A 3-year study of educational reform in rural Alaska centered around case studies in seven rural communities and school districts serving primarily Eskimo and American Indian students. Each community had embarked on a reform process called Alaska Onward to Excellence (aote) that strove to create educational partnerships between schools and their communities. The study examined how educational partnerships were formed and sustained and how they ultimately benefited Alaska Native students. A focal point was the nature of systemic change, which in rural Alaska means to fully integrate the indigenous knowledge system and the formal education system. Major findings that emerged from a cross-case analysis of the case studies were categorized into six themes: (1) sustained long-term reform; (2) strong and consistent leadership; (3) personal relationships between school personnel and community; (4) educational partnerships; (5) rural schools and communities; and (6) educational goals. The report includes executive summaries of the seven case studies and reform-related recommendations for rural schools. (Contains 25 references.) (Sv)
A long journey : Alaska onward to excellence in Yupiit/Tuluksak schools by A. Oscar Kawagley( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Anthropology and educational administration by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cultural influences in Alaskan native education : presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology, Tucson, Arizona, April 1973 by James M Orvik( Book )

6 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

9 papers presented at a Symposium on "Cultural Influences in Alaskan Native Education" held April 13, 1973 in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology
Curriculum resources for the Alaskan environment by Judy Diamondstone( Book )

3 editions published between 1990 and 2003 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Details of projects for high school students in Alaska, based on the local environment and resources
Lessons taught, lessons learned : teachers' reflections on schooling in rural Alaska by Ray, Ed Barnhardt( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection contains 15 essays by teachers who participated in the First Annual Rural Alaska Instructional Improvement Academy in Fairbanks in May 1987. The essays were written as a follow-up to the academy, based on the teachers' reflections on their own experiences in rural schools as well as on the academy workshops they attended and on the four readings included in section 3 of this publication. The teachers were asked to write about either their own notions of the ideal schooling process for rural Alaska (section 1 of the essays) or what they considered to be an appropriate curriculum unit for village schools (section 2). Essays in section 1 discuss culturally relevant education for Alaska Natives; empowerment of communities, particularly Native villages with tribal governments; a process-oriented curriculum with a project-centered approach to experiential learning; school-community cooperation; parent-student involvement in activities strengthening different types of intelligence; community-based curriculum; obstacles to educational change; and cultural and multicultural education. In the second section, the essays on proposed curriculum units contain suggestions for: (1) use of rabbit snaring to teach kindergarten and first grade language arts; (2) implementing a senior research and writing project on jobs held by non-Natives in Native villages; (3) involving third graders in projects related to the Sister School Exchange Program and the Australaska Writing Project; (4) teaching Japanese culture to high school students using the movie "Ran"; and (5) teaching Japanese culture to elementary students through music. The teachers' background readings contained in the third and final section are the following: "The Axe Handle Academy: a Proposal for a Bioregional, Thematic Humanities Education" (Ron and Suzanne Scollon); "Culture, Community and the Curriculum" (Ray Barnhardt); "The Development of an Integrated Bilingual and Cross-Cultural Curriculum in an Arctic School District" (Helen Roberts); and "Weaving Curriculum Webs: The Structure of Nonlinear Curriculum" (Rebecca Corwin, George Hein, and Diane Levin). (Sv)
Small high school programs for rural Alaska by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

4 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focusing on examination of the current status of small high schools, identification of the elements of successful programs, and formulation of a general program design, the report of the first year of the Small High Schools Project for Rural Alaska presents over 100 recommendations to help small high schools develop into effective institutions. How to achieve greater curriculum continuity, how to measure effectiveness of a high school program, how to reflect local culture in the curriculum, and the place of basketball in the schools are among the issues studied by field workers on-site for 8 months in 9 communities. Among successful program elements identified are strong community involvement and adaptation of standard programs to contemporary life in rural Alaska. The basis of a small high school program is seen as providing for the development of basic academic skills using experientially-oriented, project-centered activities emphasizing community resources; the program should be flexibly structured into a block schedule format and should revolve around three broad interdisciplinary study areas--communication arts, environmental studies, and human ecology. Other recommendations are that school districts recruit teachers carefully, and that information exchange networks and a "Small High School Program Development and Training Center" be established. (Sb)
Cross-cultural issues in Alaskan education by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

5 editions published between 1977 and 1982 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection of articles represents the state of the art with regard to understanding and attending to cross-cultural issues in Alaskan education. The views presented by the various authors indicate some of the approaches being taken to ameliorate what are probably the most vexing problems faced by educators anywhere in the country. The articles were selected to present a variety of views on a wide range of issues, all associated with the complex cross-cultural problems inherent in the delivery of educational services to Alaska's multicultural population. The authors are all active participants in the processes and programs they describe, though the views presented are their own. The book is divided into sections that deal with educational policy, educational development, community/school, teaching/learning, and language issues. (Author/IRT)
Culture, community, and the curriculum by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses 39 points relating to culture, community and the curriculum with particular reference to education programs for minorities
Cross-cultural issues in Alaskan education by Ray, Ed Barnhardt( Book )

4 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of 15 articles on cross-cultural issues in Alaskan education addresses educational policy issues, educational development issues, community/school issues, and teaching/learning issues. The one theme that permeates all of the articles is the value of participation by community members in all levels of the education of their children. Under educational policy issues are: "a Native Philosophy of Education" (Pavilla); "Cultural Definitions and Educational Programs" (Dubbs); "Cultural Considerations in Technological Innovations" (Orvik); and "The Log School: a Case for Appropriate Design" (Dubbs/Barnhardt). Educational development issues covered are: "Psychology of Culture Change and Education for Economic Development" (Tamas); "Nonformal Educational Strategies for Rural Development in Native Alaska" (Gaffney); and "a Cross-Cultural Training and Development Program for Rural Alaskan Teachers" (Grubis). Community/school issues include: "Bicultural School Organization and Curriculum" (Mendenhall); "Native Cultural Contexts and Formal Education" (Schafer); "Decisionmaking in a Rural Alaska Community" (Madsen); and "Folklore and Educational Administration in Alaska" (Rider). Teaching/learning issues are discussed in: "Promises to Keep" (Kuhn/Esmailka); "Tuning-In: Athabaskan Teachers and Athabaskan Students" (Barnhardt); "Social Control and Social Organization in an Alaskan Athabaskan Classroom" (Van Ness); and "Yup'ik Eskimo Women and Postsecondary Education" (Harrison). (Mh)
Alaska cultural standards and guidelines( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Angoon, Alaska ; Community background reports by John Connelly( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Community background reports: Bethel, Alaska by John Connelly( Book )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Anthropology and the Training of Alaska-Native Teachers by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

2 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since its beginnings in 1970, a field-based teacher education program aimed at preparing certificated Alaska native teachers has graduated 80 teachers. Until then, the University of Alaska's teacher training program had been a traditional campus-based program aimed primarily at preparing teachers for urban schools, with no course that reflected the unique cross-cultural conditions of Alaska's rural schools. As a result, nearly all teachers for rural schools were recruited from outside Alaska, with an accompanying annual turnover rate of 30-40%. The new program's unusual origins allowed it to be viewed as experimental and permitted the open-endedness of a "field" situation and a process-oriented approach. It seemed best to work closely with students and communities and to gradually develop a model that sought to build upon students' characteristics, rather than to impose an external set of expectations. The program now operates as a branch of the School of Education. Other programs have also been implemented in a diversified approach that assists native communities to put the school system to work in their behalf and makes professional control a reality. The paper is the personal narrative of an anthropologist who reflects upon his work experiences in a culturally complex and diverse setting. (Brr)
Motivating faculty through transformational leadership : a study of the relationship between presidential leadership behaviors and faculty behaviors by Frank Anthony Grosso( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Curriculum resources for the Alaskan environment : culture, community and the curriculum by Ray Barnhardt( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A goal for minority education is "cultural eclecticism," which combines features of assimilationist and cultural pluralist perspectives into an open-ended educational approach that respects cultural diversity. To achieve this, a project-centered approach to curriculum design, blending the academic functions of the school (subject-oriented) with the cultural patterns of the community (process-oriented) is most effective; the goals, content, structure and methods must also contain some form of experiential learning. The "nonformal education" approach, which draws on community resources, incorporates experiential learning, allows flexibility for different types of learning experiences, and provides opportunities for student and community influence on form and direction of learning, provides a model for adapting formal education to an informal context in minority communities. The "micro-society" approach restructures the schooling environment to create a realistic microcosm of the surrounding society. In the "school without walls" approach, students engage in directed learning activities in the real life environment of the community, and thus can acquire the equivalent structures necessary to function in their chosen adult roles. A cross-cultural, community-based approach to education is well-suited to minority students because it engenders widespread interaction between school and community participants and provides mechanisms for community influence on learning by both students and teachers. (Mh/cm)
 
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Alaska native education : views from within
Languages
English (53)

Covers
Sharing our pathways : native perspectives on education in AlaskaEducation and development : lessons from the Third World