WorldCat Identities

Hanrahan, Charles E.

Overview
Works: 23 works in 30 publications in 2 languages and 63 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1108,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Charles E Hanrahan
Agriculture in the GATT toward the next round of multilateral trade negotiations by Charles Hanrahan( Book )

5 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and Undetermined and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public budget effects of eastern Kentucky migration to Cincinnati, Ohio by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

4 editions published between 1973 and 1979 in English and Undetermined and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Agriculture in the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The article presents the evolution of the agricultural trade within the GATT negotiations and outlines the recent changes in domestic agricultural policies of the USA and the EC and their consequences for the rules of international agricultural trade.--SCAD summary
Foreign food aid programs : background and selected issues by Geoffrey S Becker( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Brazil's agricultural production and exports : selected data by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Agricultural export and food air programs : updated June 22, 1998 by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

If China suspended U.S. exports : possible impact on U.S. wheat, corn and soybean exports by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Obama Administration's Feed the Future initiative by Melissa D Ho( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The global food price crisis of 2007-2008 and the global economic crisis resulted in an increase in the proportion and absolute number of hungry people worldwide to historic levels, over 1 billion in 2009. In June 2009, at the G8 Summit in L'Aquila, Italy, President Obama pledged $3.5 billion over three years (FY2010 to FY2012) to a global hunger and food security initiative to address hunger and poverty worldwide. The U.S. commitment is part of a global pledge, by the G20 countries and others, of more than $20 billion. In May 2010, the Department of State officially launched the Administration's global hunger and food security initiative, called Feed the Future (FtF). The Department of State was the lead agency initially in developing the Feed the Future strategy, while the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is the primary agency responsible for coordinating its implementation. Feed the Future builds on the five principles for sustainable food security first articulated at L'Aquila and endorsed at the 2009 World Summit on Food Security in Rome: supporting comprehensive strategies; investment through country-owned plans; improving stronger coordination among donors; leveraging effective multilateral institutions; and delivering on sustained and accountable commitments. The two primary objectives of Feed the Future are (1) to accelerate inclusive agricultural sector growth, and (2) to improve the nutritional status in developing countries, particularly of women and children
U.S. government agencies involved in export promotion overview and issues for Congress by Shayerah Ilias( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report provides an overview of the federal government agencies that participate in U.S. export promotion efforts and the issues that they raise for Congress. The recent global economic downturn has renewed congressional debate over the role of the federal government in promoting exports. Coordination of export promotion activities is conducted through interagency bodies. In 1992, Congress attempted to enhance coordination of U.S. export promotion policy by creating the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee (TPCC), an interagency task force chaired by the Department of Commerce. Approximately 20 federal government agencies are involved in supporting U.S. exports directly or indirectly. Federal government agencies perform a wide variety of functions that contribute to export promotion, including providing information, counseling, and export assistance services; funding feasibility studies; financing and insuring U.S. trade; conducting government-to-government advocacy; and negotiating new trade agreements and enforcing existing ones. The export promotion activities of federal government agencies raise a number of issues for Congress
Agricultural trade legislation in the 100th Congress : a comparison of selected provisions of HR 3 and S. 1420 by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

La agricultura en la Ronda Uruguay by Charles E Hanrahan( )

1 edition published in 1987 in Spanish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Agriculture in the Uruguay Round( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

European integration: implications for US food and agriculture by Charles E Hanrahan( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Agricultural export and food aid programs : updated May 30, 2001 by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Agricultural export and food aid programs, updated April 11, 2005 by Charles E Hanrahan( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami food aid needs and the U.S. response by Charles E Hanrahan( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunamis: Food Aid Needs and the U.S. Response( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On December 26, 2004, an undersea earthquake of magnitude 9.0 off the coast of Aceh Province (Sumatra) in Indonesia set off a series of large tsunamis across the Indian Ocean region. In all, 12 countries were hit by wave surges, with the brunt of the impact in coastal communities in Indonesia, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The death toll has been estimated at 140,000-200,000. It is believed that between 3 and 5 million people have been affected, including those displaced, or who have lost their homes and livelihoods. An estimated 2 million people are in urgent need of food aid. Thus far, the United States, other countries, and international organizations have pledged over $4 billion in emergency assistance. The U.S. pledged contribution, including food aid valued at $34.5 million, currently stands at $350 million. The President requested, on February 14, 2005, an additional $701 million in supplemental appropriations for tsunami relief, some of which could be used for food aid. Prior to the Indian Ocean disaster, U.S. and global food aid resources were facing considerable demand for emergency food aid to respond to urgent needs, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Congress may be confronted with a number of interrelated food aid issues early in the 109th Congress, including reconciling emergency and non-emergency uses of food aid, determining the U.S. share of global food aid for tsunami victims as well as other food-insecure people in Africa and elsewhere, and funding alternatives for U.S. emergency and non-emergency food aid. This report will be updated
Mad Cow Disease and U.S. Beef Trade( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 110th Congress is expected to monitor closely U.S. efforts to regain foreign markets that banned U.S. beef when a cow in Washington state tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease) in December 2003. Rebuilding foreign confidence in the safety of U.S. beef and cattle has been impeded by two other confirmed U.S. cases of BSE, announced June 2005 and March 2006. The four major U.S. beef export markets, Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Korea, are again accepting U.S. product. Resumption of beef trade with Japan and Korea has not gone smoothly. Japan temporarily suspended all U.S. exports when prohibited materials were discovered in a shipment, but trade has now resumed. Korea rejected some shipments with bone fragments, but has not prohibited all export trade. This report will be updated. 1
International Food Aid: U.S. and Other Donor Contributions( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The United States is the world's major provider of international food aid to low-income developing countries. This report provides three indicators of the U.S. contribution to global food aid: (1) shipments of major donors compiled by the International Grains Council, (2) U.S. contributions to the United Nations World Food Program (WFP), and (3) the U.S. commitment under the Food Aid Convention (FAC). U.S. food aid accounted for 59% of food aid shipments by major donors during 1995-2003. A substantial portion of U.S. food aid is channeled through the WFP. During 1996-2004, around 48% of the food aid distributed by the WFP came from the United States. The Food Aid Convention (FAC), now expired, was an agreement among donor countries to provide a minimum amount of food aid to low-income developing countries. The food aid commitment by all FAC signatories was approximately 4.9 million metric tons (mmt). The United States pledged to provide 2.5 mmt, or 51% of the total commitment
International Food Aid Programs: Background and Issues( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For over 55 years, the United States has played a leading role in global efforts to alleviate hunger and malnutrition and to enhance world food security through international food aid activities. The development and implementation of a U.S. global food security initiative, and commitments made by global leaders to support agricultural development, have increased Congress's focus on U.S. international food aid programs. The primary objectives for foreign food aid include providing emergency and humanitarian assistance in response to natural or manmade disasters, and promoting agricultural development and food security. The United States provides food aid for emergency food relief and to support development projects. The 2008 farm bill, the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-246), authorizes through FY2012 and amends international food aid programs. These programs are primarily funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and are administered either by USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) or by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Federal foreign food aid is distributed primarily through five program authorities: the Food for Peace Act (P.L. 480), which includes four primary programs; Section 416(b) of the Agricultural Act of 1949; the Food for Progress Act of 1985; the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program; and the Local and Regional Procurement Pilot Project, which is a newly created pilot in the 2008 farm bill. In addition, the 2008 farm bill also reauthorizes the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust (BEHT), a reserve of commodities and cash for use in the Food for Peace programs to meet food aid needs
 
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Alternative Names
Hanrahan, Charles

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