WorldCat Identities

University of Wyoming Research Corporation Western Research Institute

Overview
Works: 321 works in 396 publications in 1 language and 1,676 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Researcher, Other
Classifications: TE275, 625.85
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about University of Wyoming Research Corporation
 
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Most widely held works by University of Wyoming Research Corporation
Fundamental properties of asphalts and modified asphalts( Book )

5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Superpave binder specification developed during the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHR)) from 1987-1993 classifies construction grade asphalts into rheologically similar groups. All asphalts in a given grade have the same rheological properties to within 6 deg C. The mission of this project was to improve the understanding of the expected performance of petroleum asphalts under service conditions. These conditions include physical behavior of thin asphalt films in contact with aggregate, rheology and oxidative aging of wet asphalt, behavior of asphalt after extended aging, and propensity of asphalt films to reconsolidate ("heal") after microcracking. These phenomena are not described by the current binder specification. The results of said exposures are included in Volume I and have been used to produce a comprehensive chemical model of petroleum asphalt. Finally, the results have been used to develop new analytical methods that improve the capability to predict performance of asphalt in roadway service. These 16 new tests are described in Volume II
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The primary objectives of the study were to: (1) Demonstrate that microdamage healing occurs and that it can be measured in the laboratory and in the field, (2) Confirm that the same fracture properties that control propagation of visible cracks control the propagation of microcracks, (3) Identify the asphalt constituents which influence microdamage and microdamage healing, (4) Establish appropriate correlations between microdamage and microdamage healing in the laboratory and in the field, and (5) Predict the effect of microdamage healing on pavement performance and develop the appropriate constitutive damage models that account for the effects of microdamage healing on the performance of asphalt concrete pavement layers
Chemical composition of asphalt as related to asphalt durability : state of the art by J. Claine Petersen( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The literature relating asphalt chemical composition and asphalt durability was reviewed and interpreted. Two major chemical factors affecting asphalt durability are 1) compatibility of the interacting asphalt components and 2) resistance to change from oxidative aging
Chemical properties of asphalts and their effects on pavement performance by Raymond E Robertson( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this Circular is to familiarize the asphalt user with the source of asphalt, the variable chemistry of asphalt, why variable performance should be expected when asphalt is used in roadways and what is currently missing from the specification process. Several areas are identified where refinements in the specification process would improve the ability to classify asphalts by their expected performance. This Circular summarizes more than 2,500 pages written during the past 20 years on the effects of fundamental chemistry on the rheological properties of asphalt. This Circular should be especially useful to civil engineering students who intend to work in some highway construction-related business
Engineering and environmental aspects of recycled materials for highway construction : appendix 1( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Seventeenth Oil Shale Symposium proceedings by Oil Shale Symposium( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete by Robert L Lytton( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete by Robert L Lytton( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Volume 3 documents the development of a micromechanics fracture and healing model for asphalt concrete. This model can be used to calculate the density and growth of microcracks during repeated direct tensile controlled-strain loading. The model is based on a relationship among stiffness changes in the mixture as damage occurs, the rate of change in dissipated pseudo strain energy as loading are applied to the samples and as damage occurs and mixture properties including crack length changes upon loading and mixture cohesive surface energies. The report demonstrates that microcrack growth is the dominate mode of distress at temperatures below 25C and that microcrack healing is the dominate mode of recovery of dissipated pseudo strain energy at these test temperatures. However, at temperatures above about 25C, the predominate mode of distress is plastic damage. Cracking rates during fatigue damage are related to de-wetting cohesive surface energy measurements of the bitumen whereas microcracking healing rates are related to wetting cohesive surface energy measurements of the bitumen. Surface energies of five bitumens with widely different chemical compositions were found to correlate strongly with healing properties as defined by viscoelastic fracture and healing theory."
Eighteenth Oil Shale Symposium proceedings by Oil Shale Symposium( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chemical properties of asphalts and their relationship to pavement performance by Raymond E Robertson( Book )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study considers the chemistry of petroleum asphalt at the molecular and intermolecular levels. Thousands of molecular species exist within any particular asphalt. The polarity among asphalt molecules varies widely and the physical properties are governed by the balances of polars and nonpolar components. Several speculations on the effects of chemical composition on pavement performance are offered. In general, the mechanical or structural properties of asphalt are related to the intermolecular structuring among the polars. This report describes the current status of the Strategic Highway Research Program chemical studies of petroleum asphalt. It is intended to be instructive to the non-chemist, and is a speculative effort to correlate some of the known chemical properties of asphalts with pavement performance characteristics
Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997( )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Jointly Sponsored Research Program emphasizes technology commercialization and continues to be highly successful and supported strongly and enthusiastically by WRI's industrial clientele. All of the available Department of Energy (USDOE) funding for each of the first seven years has been committed to projects. This report provides a description of projects and expenditures on fossil projects and environmental monitoring
Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research( )

7 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale. The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system
Identification of the mineral phases responsible for cementation of Lurgi spent oil shale( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study is to investigate the mineralogical character of the cements that are responsible for the increased strength of the spent oil shale. Several techniques to identify the nature of the cementing agents have been used in this study. X-ray diffraction was used to identify mineral dissolution and formation; scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the cementing agents; energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) was used to provide information on the elemental composition of both the bulk material and the cementing agents; and differential thermal analyses and thermogravimetric analyses were used to document the presence of suspected minerals that may be involved in formation of the cementing material
Preparation for upgrading western subbituminous coal( )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objective of this project was to establish the physical and chemical characteristics of western coal and determine the best preparation technologies for upgrading this resource. Western coal was characterized as an abundant, easily mineable, clean, low-sulfur coal with low heating value, high moisture, susceptibility to spontaneous ignition, and considerable transit distances from major markets. Project support was provided by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The research was conducted by the Western Research Institute, (WRI) in Laramie, Wyoming. The project scope of work required the completion of four tasks: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches and verbal contacts with consumers and producers of western coal, (3) selection of the best technologies to upgrade western coal, and (4) identification of research needed to develop the best technologies for upgrading western coals. The results of this research suggest that thermal drying is the best technology for upgrading western coals. There is a significant need for further research in areas involving physical and chemical stabilization of the dried coal product. Excessive particle-size degradation and resulting dustiness, moisture reabsorption, and high susceptibility to spontaneous combustion are key areas requiring further research. Improved testing methods for the determination of equilibrium moisture and susceptibility to spontaneous ignition under various ambient conditions are recommended
An evaluation of some innovative fragmentation systems for oil shale( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes a large-scale underground mining method, large-hole stoping, using some innovative fragmentation systems (buffer blasting, continuous loading/hauling, and mechanical miners for development). This study includes a literature review and an experimental study of one of the key design factors--buffer blasting. The purpose of the buffer-blasting experiments is to examine the swell that is necessary to achieve satisfactory fragmentation results. The study also includes a technical and economic evaluation of the new mining method compared with conventional room and pillar mining. The purpose of this study is to examine innovative methods that exist today and may provide a more efficient mining system than that currently used. Note that this is a conceptual study, and that the mining for the two mine designs were compared using a daily production rate of 75,000 tones per day. This amount was chosen because it is the maximum amount possible for a rubber-tired room and pillar operation with only a one-shaft complex
Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique
An investigation of the role of water on retrograde( )

5 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying wig be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semisolid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction
Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992( )

3 editions published between 1991 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D₂O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state ¹H and ¹³C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D₂O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D₂O and by successive exchange of H₂O associated with the coals with D₂O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal. The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction, and to conduct D₂O exchange studies to ascertain the role of water in coal liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to measure the volumetric swelling ratio for thermally- and microwave-dried coals and (2) to conduct preliminary experiments concerning the exchange of water in coal with deuterium oxide (D₂O)
 
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Alternative Names
Western Research Institute

Western Research Institute (Laramie, Wyo.)

WRI

Languages
English (65)