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University of Wyoming Research Corporation Western Research Institute

Overview
Works: 338 works in 392 publications in 1 language and 1,445 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: TE275, 625.85
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Most widely held works by University of Wyoming Research Corporation
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The primary objectives of the study were to: (1) Demonstrate that microdamage healing occurs and that it can be measured in the laboratory and in the field, (2) Confirm that the same fracture properties that control propagation of visible cracks control the propagation of microcracks, (3) Identify the asphalt constituents which influence microdamage and microdamage healing, (4) Establish appropriate correlations between microdamage and microdamage healing in the laboratory and in the field, and (5) Predict the effect of microdamage healing on pavement performance and develop the appropriate constitutive damage models that account for the effects of microdamage healing on the performance of asphalt concrete pavement layers
Fundamental properties of asphalts and modified asphalts ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Chemical composition of asphalt as related to asphalt durability : state of the art by J. Claine Petersen ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The literature relating asphalt chemical composition and asphalt durability was reviewed and interpreted. Two major chemical factors affecting asphalt durability are 1) compatibility of the interacting asphalt components and 2) resistance to change from oxidative aging
Chemical properties of asphalts and their effects on pavement performance by Raymond E Robertson ( Book )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The purpose of this Circular is to familiarize the asphalt user with the source of asphalt, the variable chemistry of asphalt, why variable performance should be expected when asphalt is used in roadways and what is currently missing from the specification process. Several areas are identified where refinements in the specification process would improve the ability to classify asphalts by their expected performance. This Circular summarizes more than 2,500 pages written during the past 20 years on the effects of fundamental chemistry on the rheological properties of asphalt. This Circular should be especially useful to civil engineering students who intend to work in some highway construction-related business
Engineering and environmental aspects of recycled materials for highway construction : appendix 1 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Seventeenth Oil Shale Symposium proceedings by Oil Shale Symposium ( Book )
2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Fundamental properties of asphalts and modified asphalts ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Superpave binder specification developed during the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHR)) from 1987-1993 classifies construction grade asphalts into rheologically similar groups. All asphalts in a given grade have the same rheological properties to within 6 deg C. The mission of this project was to improve the understanding of the expected performance of petroleum asphalts under service conditions. These conditions include physical behavior of thin asphalt films in contact with aggregate, rheology and oxidative aging of wet asphalt, behavior of asphalt after extended aging, and propensity of asphalt films to reconsolidate ("heal") after microcracking. These phenomena are not described by the current binder specification. The results of said exposures are included in Volume I and have been used to produce a comprehensive chemical model of petroleum asphalt. Finally, the results have been used to develop new analytical methods that improve the capability to predict performance of asphalt in roadway service. These 16 new tests are described in Volume II
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete by Robert L Lytton ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Volume 3 documents the development of a micromechanics fracture and healing model for asphalt concrete. This model can be used to calculate the density and growth of microcracks during repeated direct tensile controlled-strain loading. The model is based on a relationship among stiffness changes in the mixture as damage occurs, the rate of change in dissipated pseudo strain energy as loading are applied to the samples and as damage occurs and mixture properties including crack length changes upon loading and mixture cohesive surface energies. The report demonstrates that microcrack growth is the dominate mode of distress at temperatures below 25C and that microcrack healing is the dominate mode of recovery of dissipated pseudo strain energy at these test temperatures. However, at temperatures above about 25C, the predominate mode of distress is plastic damage. Cracking rates during fatigue damage are related to de-wetting cohesive surface energy measurements of the bitumen whereas microcracking healing rates are related to wetting cohesive surface energy measurements of the bitumen. Surface energies of five bitumens with widely different chemical compositions were found to correlate strongly with healing properties as defined by viscoelastic fracture and healing theory."
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete by Robert L Lytton ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Eighteenth Oil Shale Symposium proceedings by Oil Shale Symposium ( Book )
1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete ( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Chemical properties of asphalts and their relationship to pavement performance by Raymond E Robertson ( Book )
2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The study considers the chemistry of petroleum asphalt at the molecular and intermolecular levels. Thousands of molecular species exist within any particular asphalt. The polarity among asphalt molecules varies widely and the physical properties are governed by the balances of polars and nonpolar components. Several speculations on the effects of chemical composition on pavement performance are offered. In general, the mechanical or structural properties of asphalt are related to the intermolecular structuring among the polars. This report describes the current status of the Strategic Highway Research Program chemical studies of petroleum asphalt. It is intended to be instructive to the non-chemist, and is a speculative effort to correlate some of the known chemical properties of asphalts with pavement performance characteristics
FORT UNION DEEP ( )
2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No. 1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate
Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997 ( )
2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Summaries are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation and product market study; Impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO₂ mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Contained recovery of oily wastes field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; B Series pilot plant tests; In-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; Solid state NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; Acid mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area; PERF dispersion modeling project, Phase 2; Field testing of the TaBoRR Process using the asphalt and dry bottoms configurations; and Validation of a new soil VOC sampler
Microdamage healing in asphalt and asphalt concrete ( Book )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Nineteenth Oil Shale Symposium proceedings by Oil Shale Symposium ( Book )
2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
WRI-DOE Tar-Sand Symposium by WRI-DOE Tar-Sand Symposium ( Book )
1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Characterization of the WRI entrained-flow reactor ( )
2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The ultimate goal of the current research has been to obtain kinetic and stoichiometric data on the high-heating-rate pyrolysis of a western oil shale. To accomplish this, a reactor system had to be chosen that could attain the high heating rates observed in fluid beds, but avoid some of their limitations. one of the most favorable high-heating-rate systems for accurate reaction research is an entrained-flow reactor. With proper design, heating rates can equal and surpass those observed in fluid-bed reactors, and product recovery is simpler and more efficient. To obtain the larger amounts of solid and liquid products needed for detailed chemical and physical analyses, the system need only be run for a longer time. Western Research Institute has designed, constructed, and begun operating a high-heating-rate, pressurized, entrained-flow reactor system. This reactor system was developed to provide kinetic and stoichiometric data on the high-heating-rate pyrolysis of oil shale and to optimize operating conditions for the scale-up of a proprietary commercial process. This report describes the reactor system and its performance characteristics
Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation ( )
2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW{trademark}) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test
 
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Alternative Names
Western Research Institute
Western Research Institute (Laramie, Wyo.)
WRI
Languages
English (48)