WorldCat Identities

Hanhart, Robert 1925-

Overview
Works: 192 works in 658 publications in 8 languages and 5,172 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Bibliography  Chronologies  Commentaries  Concordances 
Roles: Author, Editor, Honoree, Creator, Other, Contributor, Commentator, Author of introduction
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Robert Hanhart
Beiträge zur alttestamentlichen Theologie : Festschrift für Walther Zimmerli zum 70. Geburtstag by Herbert Donner( Book )

9 editions published in 1977 in 3 languages and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Untersuchungen zur israelitisch-jü̋dischen Chronologie by Alfred Jepsen( Book )

11 editions published in 1964 in German and held by 243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text und Textgeschichte des 1. Esrabuches by Robert Hanhart( Book )

10 editions published in 1974 in German and held by 212 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text und Textgeschichte des Buches Tobit by Robert Hanhart( Book )

11 editions published in 1984 in German and held by 197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text und Textgeschichte des Buches Judith by Robert Hanhart( Book )

13 editions published in 1979 in German and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Esdrae liber I( Book )

19 editions published between 1974 and 1991 in 3 languages and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Iudith( Book )

14 editions published between 1966 and 1979 in 3 languages and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Septuaginta : id est Vetus Testamentum Graece iuxta LXX interpretes( Book )

6 editions published in 2006 in Greek, Ancient and Latin and held by 162 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Esdrae liber II( Book )

5 editions published in 1993 in Greek, Ancient and German and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Text und Textgeschichte des 2. Esrabuches by Robert Hanhart( Book )

10 editions published in 2003 in German and Polish and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Septuagint version of Isaiah and cognate studies by Isaac Leo Seeligmann( Book )

6 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 140 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Altes Testament by Werner H Schmidt( Book )

9 editions published in 1989 in German and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drei Studien zum Judentum by Robert Hanhart( Book )

8 editions published in 1967 in German and held by 135 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tobit( Book )

6 editions published in 1983 in Greek, Ancient and Greek, Modern and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Zum Text des 2. und 3. Makkabäerbuches : Probleme der Überlieferung der Auslegung und der Ausgabe by Robert Hanhart( Book )

13 editions published between 1961 and 1962 in German and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maccabaeorum liber II by Robert Hanhart( Book )

11 editions published between 1959 and 1976 in 3 languages and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sacharja 1-8 by Robert Hanhart( Book )

6 editions published in 1998 in German and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Esther by Robert Hanhart( Book )

11 editions published between 1965 and 1966 in 3 languages and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Maccabaeorum liber III( Book )

8 editions published between 1960 and 1980 in Greek, Ancient and German and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Das Bild der Jeanne d'Arc in der französischen Historiographie by Robert Hanhart( Book )

12 editions published in 1955 in German and Undetermined and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Septuaginta : id est Vetus Testamentum Graece iuxta LXX interpretes
Alternative Names
Robert Hanhart deutscher Evangelischer Theologe

Robert Hanhart Duits theoloog

Robert Hanhart German evangelical theologian

ハンハルト, R

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