WorldCat Identities

Greenhill, Pauline

Overview
Works: 42 works in 209 publications in 2 languages and 15,683 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Folklore  Film adaptations  Reference works  Television adaptations  Case studies  History  Encyclopedias  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: PN1995.9.F34, 791.436559
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Pauline Greenhill
Fairy tale films : visions of ambiguity by Sidney Eve Matrix( )

19 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 2,074 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To set the field: fairy tales are traditional or literary fictional narratives that combine human and non-human protagonists with elements of wonder and the supernatural. Scholars of literature and film explore how such narratives manifest in film, either native to it or changelings from written literature or oral tradition. Among the topics are the commodification of childhood in contemporary fairy tale film, Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth/El Laberinto del fauno and neomagical realism, feminism and place in The Juniper Tree, patriarchal backlash and nostalgia in Disney's Enchanted, feminist cultural pedagogy in Angela Carter and Neil Jordan's The Company of Wolves, and a secret midnight ball and a magic cloak in Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut
Transgressive tales : queering the Grimms by Project Muse( )

15 editions published in 2012 in English and Spanish and held by 1,937 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The stories in the Grimm brothers' Kinder- und Hausmärchen (Children's and Household Tales), first published in 1812 and 1815, have come to define academic and popular understandings of the fairy tale genre. Yet over a period of forty years, the brothers, especially Wilhelm, revised, edited, sanitized, and bowdlerized the tales, publishing the seventh and final edition in 1857 with many of the sexual implications removed. However, the contributors in Transgressive Tales: Queering the Grimms demonstrate that the Grimms and other collectors paid less attention to ridding the tales of non-heterosexual implications and that, in fact, the Grimms' tales are rich with queer possibilities. Editors Kay Turner and Pauline Greenhill introduce the volume with an overview of the tales' literary and interpretive history, surveying their queerness in terms of not just sex, gender and sexuality, but also issues of marginalization, oddity, and not fitting into society. In three thematic sections, contributors then consider a range of tales and their queer themes. In Faux Femininities, essays explore female characters, and their relationships and feminine representation in the tales. Contributors to Revising Rewritings consider queer elements in rewritings of the Grimms' tales, including Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber, Jeanette Winterson's Twelve Dancing Princesses, and contemporary reinterpretations of both 'Snow White' and 'Snow White and Rose Red.' Contributors in the final section, Queering the Tales, consider queer elements in some of the Grimms' original tales and explore intriguing issues of gender, biology, patriarchy, and transgression."--Publisher description
Ethnicity in the mainstream : three studies of English Canadian culture in Ontario by Pauline Greenhill( )

13 editions published between 1994 and 2014 in English and held by 1,769 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Greenhill presents three studies from the perspective of a folklorist and within the framework of feminist analysis. Loosely linked by the theme of power and discussion of carnivalesque elements of traditional and popular culture, these studies examine immigrants' narratives about adjusting to life in Canada; Morris dancing as practised by Forest City Morris of London, Ontario; and actions and responses of promoters and residents to the development of the Shakespeare festival in Stratford, Ontario. Greenhill notes that because the English are perceived as lacking carnivalesque traditions, their position vis-a-vis other ethnic groups has been defined solely in terms of power, and demonstrates that concepts of power and entitlement are inextricably bound up in English self-definition. She concludes by examining the implications for social scientific practice of an insider studying her own culture and the political ramifications of such studies for a pluralistic, multicultural society such as Canada."--Résumé de l'éditeur
Undisciplined women : tradition and culture in Canada by Pauline Greenhill( )

12 editions published between 1997 and 2014 in English and held by 1,657 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Contributors demonstrate that informal traditional and popular expressive cultural forms continue to be central to Canadians' gender constructions and clearly display the creation and re-creation of women's often subordinate position in society. They not only explore positive and negative images of women - the witch, the Icelandic Mountain Woman, and the Hollywood "killer dyke"--But also examine how actual women - taxi drivers, quilters, spiritual healers, and storytellers - negotiate and remake these images in their lives and work. Contributors also propose models for facilitating feminist dialogue on traditional and popular culture in Canada."--Jacket
True poetry : traditional and popular verse in Ontario by Pauline Greenhill( )

10 editions published between 1989 and 2014 in English and held by 1,652 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ontario is not a homogeneous culture, but rather a conglomerate of ethnic cultures and rural and urban populations. In True Poetry: Traditional and Popular Verse in Ontario, Pauline Greenhill describes and evaluates the significance of folk verse, suggesting that it provides a method for creating community solidarity and communicating cultural values and expectations
Channeling wonder : fairy tales on television by Project Muse( )

11 editions published in 2014 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,518 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Television has long been a familiar vehicle for fairy tales and is, in some ways, an ideal medium for the genre. Both more mundane and more wondrous than cinema, TV magically captures sounds and images that float through the air to bring them into homes, schools, and workplaces. Even apparently realistic forms, like the nightly news, routinely employ discourses of "once upon a time," "happily ever after," and "a Cinderella story." In Channeling Wonder: Fairy Tales on Television, Pauline Greenhill and Jill Terry Rudy offer contributions that invite readers to consider what happens when fairy tale, a narrative genre that revels in variation, joins the flow of television experience. Looking in detail at programs from Canada, France, Italy, Japan, the UK, and the U.S., this volume's twenty-three international contributors demonstrate the wide range of fairy tales that make their way into televisual forms. The writers look at fairy-tale adaptations in musicals like Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella, anthologies like Jim Henson's The Storyteller, made-for-TV movies like Snow White: A Tale of Terror, Bluebeard, and the Red Riding Trilogy, and drama serials like Grimm and Once Upon a Time. Contributors also explore more unexpected representations in the Carosello commercial series, the children's show Super Why!, the anime series Revolutionary Girl Utena, and the live-action dramas Train Man and Rich Man Poor Woman. In addition, they consider how elements from familiar tales, including "Hansel and Gretel," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Beauty and the Beast," "Snow White," and "Cinderella" appear in the long arc serials Merlin, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Dollhouse, and in a range of television formats including variety shows, situation comedies, and reality TV. Channeling Wonder demonstrates that fairy tales remain ubiquitous on TV, allowing for variations but still resonating with the wonder tale's familiarity. Scholars of cultural studies, fairy-tale studies, folklore, and television studies will enjoy this first-of-its-kind volume.--Publisher website
Make the night hideous : four English Canadian charivaris, 1881-1940 by Pauline Greenhill( )

9 editions published between 2010 and 2014 in English and held by 1,435 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom from members of a community, usually to a newlywed couple, accompanied by a qut̊e (a request for a treat or money in exchange for the noisy performance) and/or pranks. Up to the first decades of the twentieth century, charivaris were for the most part enacted to express disapproval of the relationship that was their focus, such as those between individuals of different ages, races, or religions. While later charivaris maintained the same rituals, their meaning changed to a welcoming of the marriage. Make the Night Hideous explores this mysterious transformation using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants. Pauline Greenhill's unique and fascinating work explores the malleability of a tradition, its continuing value, and its contestation in a variety of discourses
Encyclopedia of women's folklore and folklife by Theresa A Vaughan( )

7 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 1,028 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the Publisher: From the Stone Age to the cyber age, women and men have experienced the world differently. Out of a cosmos of goddesses and she-devils, earth mothers and Madonnas, witches and queens, saints and whores, a vast body of women's folklore has come into bloom. The beliefs and traditions central to womanhood have colored a vast tapestry of literary, artistic, spiritual, and cultural achievements. International in scope, this massive encyclopedia explores the folklore at the heart of women's lives around the world. More than 260 alphabetically arranged entries written by more than 130 expert contributors detail the world of women from girlhood to widowhood and everything in between. Topics covered include: Abortion; Banshee; Barbie Doll; Best Friend; Cinderella; Courtship; Cowgirl; Cyber culture; Erotic Folklore; Folk Photography; Glass Ceiling; Hair; Hip Hop Culture/Rap; Lesbian and Queer Studies; Marriage; Menstruation; Muslim Women's Folklore; Photocopy Lore; Quilt making; and many more. In addition, there are entries on women's folklore and folklife in 15 regions of the world, such as the Caribbean, Central Asia, the Middle East, and Western Europe. Entries provide cross-references and cite works for further reading, and the encyclopedia closes with a selected bibliography of print and electronic resources. Students learning about history, world cultures, religion and spirituality, healing and traditional medicine, and literature will welcome this companion to the daily life of women across time and continents. FEATURES AND BENEFITS: 4 substantial overview essays survey the present state of scholarship on women's folklore and folklife around the world. More than 260 alphabetically arranged entries written by more than 130 expert contributors discuss a wide range of topics related to women's folklore and folklife. An alphabetical list of entries provides easy access to the contents of the encyclopedia. A guide to related topics groups entries in broad categories to help readers find related terms. Entry bibliographies list works for further reading. A selected bibliography lists the most important general print and electronic resources on women's folklore and folklife
Unsettling assumptions : tradition, gender, drag by Pauline Greenhill( )

13 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and Undetermined and held by 863 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In Unsettling Assumptions, editors Pauline Greenhill and Diane Tye link gender studies with traditional and popular culture studies to examine how tradition and gender can intersect to unsettle assumptions about culture and its study. Contributors explore the intersections of traditional expressive culture and sex/gender systems by challenging their conventional constructions, using sex/gender as a lens to question, investigate, or upset concepts like family, ethics, and authenticity. Individual essays consider myriad topics such as Thanksgiving turkeys, rockabilly and bar fights, Chinese tales of female ghosts, selkie stories, a noisy Mennonite New Year's celebration, the Distaff Gospels, Kentucky tobacco farmers, international adoptions, and more. In Unsettling Assumptions, expressive culture emerges as fundamental both to our sense of belonging to a family, an occupation, or friendship group and, most notably, to identity performativity. Within larger contexts, these works offer a better understanding of cultural attitudes like misogyny, homophobia, and racism as well as the construction and negotiation of power"--
Make the Night Hideous Discourses of Four Canadian Charivaris, 1881-1940 by Pauline Greenhill( )

3 editions published between 2010 and 2016 in English and held by 454 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The charivari is a loud, late-night surprise house-visiting custom from members of a community, usually to a newlywed couple, accompanied by a quête (a request for a treat or money in exchange for the noisy performance) and/or pranks. Up to the first decades of the twentieth century, charivaris were for the most part enacted to express disapproval of the relationship that was their focus, such as those between individuals of different ages, races, or religions. While later charivaris maintained the same rituals, their meaning changed to a welcoming of the marriage.Make the Night Hideous explores this mysterious transformation using four detailed case studies from different time periods and locations across English Canada, as well as first-person accounts of more recent charivari participants. Pauline Greenhill's unique and fascinating work explores the malleability of a tradition, its continuing value, and its contestation in a variety of discourses
Fairy-tale films beyond Disney : international perspectives by Jack Zipes( Book )

13 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 272 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The fairy tale has become one of the dominant cultural forms and genres internationally, thanks in large part to its many manifestations on screen. Yet the history and relevance of the fairy-tale film have largely been neglected. In this follow-up to Jack Zipes’s award-winning book The Enchanted Screen (2011), Fairy-Tale Films Beyond Disney offers the first book-length multinational, multidisciplinary exploration of fairy-tale cinema. Bringing together twenty-three of the world’s top fairy-tale scholars to analyze the enormous scope of these films, Zipes and colleagues Pauline Greenhill and Kendra Magnus-Johnston present perspectives on film from every part of the globe, from Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away, to Jan Švankmajer’s Alice, to the transnational adaptations of 1001 Nights and Hans Christian Andersen. Contributors explore filmic traditions in each area not only from their different cultural backgrounds, but from a range of academic fields, including criminal justice studies, education, film studies, folkloristics, gender studies, and literary studies. Fairy-Tale Films Beyond Disney offers readers an opportunity to explore the intersections, disparities, historical and national contexts of its subject, and to further appreciate what has become an undeniably global phenomenon."--Back cover
Clever maids, fearless Jacks, and a cat : fairy tales from a living oral tradition by Anita Best( )

4 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Passed on orally between generations as a community tradition, these sensitive and artful tales don't appear anywhere in print. Features ethnopoetic transcriptions from authors to give authentic accounts of "living" oral performances from the past century and to demonstrate the artistry that is possible without written word"--Provided by publisher
So we can remember : showing family photographs by Pauline Greenhill( Book )

16 editions published between 1980 and 1981 in English and Undetermined and held by 214 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Routledge companion to media and fairy-tale cultures by Pauline Greenhill( )

9 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From Cinderella to comic con to colonialism and more, this companion provides readers with a comprehensive and current guide to the fantastic, uncanny, and wonderful worlds of the fairy tale across media and cultures. It offers a clear, detailed, and expansive overview of contemporary themes and issues throughout the intersections of the fields of fairy-tale studies, media studies, and cultural studies, addressing, among others, issues of reception, audience cultures, ideology, remediation, and adaptation. Examples and case studies are drawn from a wide range of pertinent disciplines and settings, providing thorough, accessible treatment of central topics and specific media from around the globe"--
Lots of stories : maritime narratives from the Creighton collection by Pauline Greenhill( Book )

10 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 179 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

REALITY, MAGIC, AND OTHER LIES : fairy-tale film truths by Pauline Greenhill( )

4 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Reality, Magic, and Other Lies: Fairy-Tale Film Truths explores connections and discontinuities between lies and truths in fairy-tale films to directly address the current politics of fairy tale and reality. Since the Enlightenment, notions of magic and wonder have been relegated to the realm of the fanciful, with science and reality understood as objective and true. But the skepticism associated with postmodern thought and critiques from diverse perspectives-including but not limited to anti-racist, decolonial, disability, and feminist theorizing-renders this binary distinction questionable. Further, the precise content of magic and science has shifted through history and across location. Pauline Greenhill offers the idea that fairy tales, particularly through the medium of film, often address those distinctions by making magic real and reality magical"--
Screening justice : Canadian crime films, culture and society( Book )

4 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Screening Justice in Canada is a scholarly exploration of films that focus centrally on crime and justice in Canada. Defining Canadian crime films as those that focus significantly on crime and its consequences in Canadian society, the book is as much about the ways crime films provide vehicles for understanding what it means to be Canadian as it is about the depiction and representation of crime and justice in Canadian cinema and television. The films examined in this book span all regions of Canada and include case studies of films set in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, British Columbia's Lower Mainland, the Canadian prairies, Ontario, and Quebec. Moreover, Canadian crime films produced from the 1930s to the present are included in these analyses. Contributors to this multi-and interdisciplinary volume are drawn from Criminology, Criminal Justice Studies, English literature, Art History, Film Studies and Communications, Cultural Anthropology, Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies. This is the first comprehensive Canadian volume on crime films that takes up cultural criminology's call for more critical scholarly analyses of the interplay between crime, culture, and society. Adopting American criminologist Nicole Rafter's concept "popular criminology," the essays in this volume all take crime films seriously as popular efforts to understand the causes, consequences and meanings of crime in Canadian society."--
Fairy Tale Films by Matrix Sidney E( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in Undetermined and English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this, the first collection of essays to address the development of fairy tale film as a genre, Pauline Greenhill and Sidney Eve Matrix stress, ""the mirror of fairy-tale film reflects not so much what its audience members actually are but how they see themselves and their potential to develop (or, likewise, to regress)."" As Jack Zipes says further in the foreword
Ethnicity in the mainstream : selling Stratford as an English place by Pauline Greenhill( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

So we can remember : showing family photographs by Pauline Greenhill( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Fairy tale films : visions of ambiguity Fairy Tale Films
Covers
Undisciplined women : tradition and culture in CanadaMake the night hideous : four English Canadian charivaris, 1881-1940Encyclopedia of women's folklore and folklifeFairy Tale Films
Alternative Names
Greenhill, Pauline, 1955-

Greenhill, Pauline Jane.

Greenhill, Pauline Jane 1955-

Languages
English (171)

Spanish (1)